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IV. Radicals

Essential Readings:


J. Cropsey, (1987) ‘Karl Marx’, in L. Strauss and J. Cropsey, (eds) History of Political Philosophy, 2ndEdition. Chicago: Chicago University Press, pp. 802-828.
L. Wilde, (2003) ‘Early Marx’, in D. Boucher and P. Kelly, P. (eds) Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 404-435.
V. Bryson, (1992) ‘Marxist Feminism in Russia’ in Feminist Political Theory, London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 114-122
C. Sypnowich, (1993) ‘Alexandra Kollontai and the Fate of Bolshevik Feminism’ Labour/Le Travail Vol. 32 (Fall 1992) pp. 287-295
A. Kollontai (1909), The Social Basis of the Woman Question, Available at http://www.marxists.org/archive/kollonta/1909/social-basis.htm, Accessed: 19.04.2013
Additional Readings:
A. Bloom, (1987) ‘Jean-Jacques Rousseau’, in Strauss, L. and Cropsey, J. (eds.) History of Political Philosophy, 2nd edition. Chicago: Chicago University Press, pp. 559-580.
Selections from A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Available at http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/phl302/texts/wollstonecraft/woman-a.html#CHAPTER%20II, Accessed: 19.04.2013.


  1. Skoble and T. Machan, (2007) Political Philosophy: Essential Selections, New Delhi: Pearson Education, pp. 328-354.




  1. Ollman (1991) Marxism: An Uncommon Introduction, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers.

G. Blakely and V. Bryson (2005) Marx and Other Four Letter Words, London: Pluto




  1. Skoble, and T. Machan, (2007) Political Philosophy: Essential Selections, New Delhi: Pearson Education, pp. 286-327.




  1. Kollontai, (1977) ‘Social Democracy and the Women’s Question’, in Selected Writings of Alexandra Kollontai, London: Allison & Busby, pp. 29-74.




  1. Kollontai, (1977) ‘Make Way for Winged Eros: A Letter to the Youth’, in Selected Writings of Alexandra Kollontai Allison & Busby, pp. 201-292.

C. Porter, (1980) Alexandra Kollontai: The Lonely Struggle of the Woman who defied Lenin,

New York: Dutton Children’s Books.


6.2 Paper XIV- Indian Political Thought-II




Course objective: Based on the study of individual thinkers, the course introduces a wide span of thinkers and themes that defines the modernity of Indian political thought. The objective is to study general themes that have been produced by thinkers from varied social and temporal contexts. Selected extracts from original texts are also given to discuss in the class. The list of additional readings is meant for teachers as well as the more interested students.

I. Introduction to Modern Indian Political Thought (4 lectures)

Unit-I

II. Rammohan Roy: Rights (4 lectures)

III.Balgangadhar Tilak (4 lectures)

Unit-II

IV. Vivekananda: Ideal Society (5 lectures)

V. Gandhi: Swaraj (5 lectures)

Unit-III

VI. Ambedkar: Social Justice (5 lectures)

VII. Tagore: Critique of Nationalism (4 lectures)



Unit-IV

VIII. Iqbal: Community (5 lectures)

IX. Savarkar: Hindutva (4 lectures)

Unit-V

X. Nehru: Secularism (4 lectures)

XI. Lohia: Socialism (4 lectures)


Reading List

I. Introduction to Modern Indian Political Thought

Essential Readings:


V. Mehta and T. Pantham (eds.), (2006) ‘A Thematic Introduction to Political Ideas in Modern India: Thematic Explorations, History of Science, Philosophy and Culture in Indian civilization’

Vol. 10, Part: 7, New Delhi: Sage Publications, pp. xxvii-ixi.


D. Dalton, (1982) ‘Continuity of Innovation’, in Indian Idea of Freedom: Political Thought of Swami Vivekananda, Aurobindo Ghose, Rabindranath Tagore and Mahatma Gandhi,

Academic Press: Gurgaon, pp. 1-28.


II. Rammohan Roy: Rights
Essential Readings:
R. Roy, (1991) ‘The Precepts of Jesus, the Guide to Peace and Happiness’, S. Hay, (ed.) Sources of Indian Traditio, Vol. 2. Second Edition. New Delhi: Penguin, pp. 24-29.
C. Bayly, (2010) ‘Rammohan and the Advent of Constitutional Liberalism in India 1800-1830’, in Sh. Kapila (ed.), An intellectual History for India, New Delhi: Cambridge University Press, pp. 18- 34.
T. Pantham, (1986) ‘The Socio-Religious Thought of Rammohan Roy’, in Th. Panthom and K. Deutsch, (eds.) Political Thought in Modern India, New Delhi: Sage, pp.32-52.

Additional Reading:


S. Sarkar, (1985) ‘Rammohan Roy and the break With the Past’, in A Critique on colonial India, Calcutta: Papyrus, pp. 1-17.
III. Pandita Ramabai: Gender
Essential Readings:

P. Ramabai, (2000) ‘Woman’s Place in Religion and Society’, in M. Kosambi (ed.), Pandita Ramabai Through her Own Words: Selected Works, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 150-155.


M. Kosambi, (1988) ‘Women’s Emancipation and Equality: Pandita Ramabai’s Contribution to Women’s Cause’, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 23(44), pp. 38-49.
Additional Reading:
U. Chakravarti, (2007) Pandita Ramabai - A Life and a Time, New Delhi: Critical Quest, pp. 1-40.
G. Omvedt, (2008) ‘Ramabai: Women in the Kingdom of God’, in Seeking Begumpura: The Social Vision of Anti Caste Intellectuals, New Delhi: Navayana. pp. 205-224.

IV. Vivekananda: Ideal Society

Essential Readings:

S. Vivekananda, (2007) ‘The Real and the Apparent Man’, S. Bodhasarananda (ed.),
Selections from the Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda, Kolkata: Advaita Ashrama, pp. 126-129.

A. Sen, (2003) ‘Swami Vivekananda on History and Society’, in Swami Vivekananda, Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 62- 79.

H. Rustav, (1998) ‘Swami Vivekananda and the Ideal Society’, in W. Radice (ed.), Swami Vivekananda and the Modernisation of Hinduism, Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 264-280.

Additional Reading:


Raghuramaraju, (2007) ‘Swami and Mahatma, Paradigms: State and Civil Society’, in Debates in Indian Philosophy: Classical, Colonial, and Contemporary, Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 29-65.

V. Gandhi: Swaraj

Essential Readings:


M. Gandhi, (1991) ‘Satyagraha: Transforming Unjust Relationships through the Power of the Soul’, in S. Hay (ed.), Sources of Indian Tradition, Vol. 2.Second Edition, New Delhi: Penguin, pp. 265-270.

A. Parel, (ed.), (2002) ‘Introduction’, in Gandhi, freedom and Self Rule, Delhi: Vistaar Publication.


D. Dalton, (1982) Indian Idea of Freedom: Political Thought of Swami Vivekananda, AurobindoGhose, Mahatma Gandhi and Rabindranath Tagore, Gurgaon: The Academic Press, pp. 154- 190.
Additional Reading:
R. Terchek, (2002) ‘Gandhian Autonomy in Late Modern World’, in A. Parel (ed.), Gandhi, Freedom and Self Rule. Delhi: Sage.

VI. Ambedkar: Social Justice

Essential Readings:


B. Ambedkar, (1991) ‘Constituent Assembly Debates’, S. Hay (ed.), Sources of Indian Tradition, Vol. 2, Second Edition, New Delhi: Penguin, pp. 342-347.
V. Rodrigues, (2007) ‘Good society, Rights, Democracy Socialism’, in S. Thorat and Aryama (eds.), Ambedkar in Retrospect - Essays on Economics, Politics and Society, Jaipur: IIDS and Rawat Publications.
B. Mungekar, (2007) ‘Quest for Democratic Socialism’, in S. Thorat, and Aryana (eds.),
Ambedkar in Retrospect - Essays on Economics, Politics and Society, Jaipur: IIDS and Rawat Publications, pp. 121-142.
Additional Reading:
P. Chatterjee, (2005) ‘Ambedkar and the Troubled times of Citizenship’, in V. Mehta and Th. Pantham (eds.), Political ideas in modern India: Thematic Explorations, New Delhi: Sage, pp. 73-92.

VII. Tagore: Critique of Nationalism

Essential Readings:


R. Tagore, (1994) ‘The Nation’, S. Das (ed.), The English Writings of Rabindranath Tagore, Vol. 3, New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi, pp. 548-551.
R. Chakravarty, (1986) ‘Tagore, Politics and Beyond’, in Th. Panthams and K. Deutsch (eds.),

Political Thought in Modern India, New Delhi: Sage, pp. 177-191.
M. Radhakrishnan, and Debasmita, (2003) ‘Nationalism is a Great Menace: Tagore and Nationalism’ in P. Hogan, Colm and L. Pandit, (eds.) Rabindranath Tagore: Universality and Tradition, London: Rosemont Publishing and Printing Corporation, pp. 29-39.
Additional Reading:


  1. Nandy, (1994) ‘Rabindranath Tagore & Politics of Self’, in Illegitimacy of Nationalism, Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 1-50.



VIII. Iqbal: Community
Essential Readings:
M. Iqbal, (1991) ‘Speeches and Statements’, in S. Hay (ed.), Sources of Indian Tradition, Vol. 2, Second Edition, New Delhi: Penguin, pp. 218-222.

A. Engineer, (1980) ‘Iqbal’s Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam’, in Social Scientist, Vol.8 (8), pp. 52-63.


Madani, (2005) Composite Nationalism and Islam, New Delhi: Manohar, pp. 66-91.
Additional Reading:
L. Gordon-Polonskya, (1971) ‘Ideology of Muslim Nationalism’, in H. Malik (ed.), Iqbal: Poet-Philosopher of Pakistan, New York: Columbia University Press, pp. 108-134.
IX. Savarkar: Hindutva
Essential Readings:
V.Savarkar, ‘Hindutva is Different from Hinduism’, available at http://www.savarkar.org/en/hindutva-/essentials-hindutva/hindutva-different-hinduism, Accessed: 19.04.2013
J. Sharma, (2003) Hindutva: Exploring the Idea of Hindu Nationalism, Delhi: Penguin, pp. 124-172.
Additional Reading:

Dh. Keer, (1966) Veer Savarkar, Bombay: Popular Prakashan, pp. 223-250.


X. Nehru: Secularism
Essential Readings:
J. Nehru, (1991) ‘Selected Works’, in S. Hay (ed.), Sources of Indian Tradition, Vol. 2, Second Edition, New Delhi: Penguin, pp. 317-319.
R. Pillai, (1986) ‘Political thought of Jawaharlal Nehru’, in Th. Pantham, and K. Deutsch (eds.), Political Thought in Modem India, New Delhi: Sage, pp. 260- 274.
B. Zachariah, (2004) Nehru, London: Routledge Historical Biographies, pp. 169-213.
Additional Reading:

P. Chatterjee, (1986) ‘The Moment of Arrival: Nehru and the Passive Revolution’, in


Nationalist Thought and the Colonial World: A Derivative Discourse? London: Zed Books, pp. 131-166

XI. Lohia: Socialism
Essential Readings:
M. Anees and V. Dixit (eds.), (1984) Lohia: Many Faceted Personality, Rammanohar Lohia Smarak Smriti.
S. Sinha, (2010) ‘Lohia’s Socialism: An underdog’s perspective’, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. XLV (40) pp. 51-55.


  1. Kumar, (2010) ‘Understanding Lohia’s Political Sociology: Intersectionality of Caste, Class, Gender and Language Issue’, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. XLV (40), pp. 64-70.


GENERIC ELECTIVE (INTERDISCIPLINARY)-1to 4 (two subjects, Minor-1 and Minor-2)
Minor-1 subjects to choose from (Indian history/Indian economy/Maths/Odia/Psychology/Sociology) except core subject

Minor-2 subjects to choose from (Indian polity/Indian Philosophy/Home science/Education/ Indian Labour studies)


SEMESTER-IV
(C)DISCIPLINE SPECIFIC ELECTIVE -4 (DSE)

1. Human Rights in a Comparative Perspective
Course objective: This course attempts to build an understanding of human rights among students through a study of specific issues in a comparative perspective. It is important for students to see how debates on human rights have taken distinct forms historically and in the contemporary world. The course seeks to anchor all issues in the Indian context, and pulls out another country to form a broader comparative frame. Students will be expected to use a range of resources, including films, biographies, and official documents to study each theme. Thematic discussion of sub-topics in the second and third sections should include state response to issues and structural violence questions.
Unit-I_I._Human_Rights:_Theory__Understanding_Human_Rights:_Three_Generations_of_Rights__Unit-II'>Unit-I
I. Human Rights: Theory

  1. Understanding Human Rights: Three Generations of Rights

Unit-II


  1. Institutionalization: Universal Declaration of Human Rights




  1. Rights in National Constitutions: South Africa and India

Unit-III_II._Issues_(5_weeks)'>Unit-III

II. Issues (5 weeks)



  1. Torture: USA and India




  1. Terrorism and Insecurity of Minorities: USA and India

Unit-IV

  1. Surveillance and Censorship: China and India


Unit-V
III. Structural Violence (4 weeks)

  1. Caste and Race: South Africa and India




  1. Gender and Violence: India and Pakistan




  1. Adivasis/Aboriginals and the Land Question: Australia and India


READING LIST

  1. Human Rights: Theory and Institutionalization

Essential Readings:




  1. Hoffman and P. Graham, (2006) ‘Human Rights’, Introduction to Political Theory, Delhi, Pearson, pp. 436-458.

SAHRDC (2006) ‘Introduction to Human Rights’; ‘Classification of Human Rights: An Overview of the First, Second, and Third Generational Rights’, in Introducing Human Rights, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.


The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Chapter 2: Bill of Rights.
The Constitution of India, Chapter 3: Fundamental Rights

II. Issues

a. Torture: USA and India

Essential Readings:

M. Lippman, (1979) ‘The Protection of Universal Human Rights: The Problem of Torture’

Universal Human Rights, Vol. 1(4), pp. 25-55
J. Lokaneeta, (2011) ‘Torture in the TV Show 24: Circulation of Meanings’; ‘Jurisprudence on Torture and Interrogations in India’, in Transnational Torture Law, Violence, and State Power in the United States and India, Delhi: Orient Blackswan,
D. O’Byrne, (2007) ‘Torture’, in Human Rights: An Introduction, Delhi: Pearson, pp. 164-197.

b. Surveillance and Censorship: China and India

Essential Readings:


D. O’Byrne, (2007) ‘Censorship’, in Human Rights: An Introduction, Delhi: Pearson, pp. 106-138.
D. Lyon, (2008) Surveillance Society, Talk for Festival del Diritto, Piacenza, Italia, September 28, pp.1-7.
Fu Hualing, (2012) ‘Politicized Challenges, Depoliticized Responses: Political Monitoring in China’s Transitions’, paper presented at a conference on States of Surveillance: Counter-Terrorism and Comparative Constitutionalism, at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, 13-14 December.
U. Singh, (2012) ‘Surveillance Regimes in India’, paper presented at a conference on States of Surveillance: Counter-Terrorism and Comparative Constitutionalism, at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, 13-14 December.
c. Terrorism and Insecurity of Minorities: USA and India

Essential Readings:


E. Scarry, (2010) ‘Resolving to Resist’, in Rule of Law, Misrule of Men, Cambridge: Boston Review Books, MIT, pp.1-53.
M. Ahmad, (2002) ‘Homeland Insecurities: Racial Violence the Day after September 11’, Social Text, 72, Vol. 20(3), pp. 101-116.
U. Singh, (2007) ‘The Unfolding of Extraordinariness: POTA and the Construction of Suspect Communities’, in The State, Democracy and Anti-terror Laws in India, Delhi: Sage Publications, pp.165-219
3. Structural Conflicts

a. Caste and Race: South Africa and India

Essential Readings:


A. Pinto, (2001) ‘UN Conference against Racism: Is Caste Race?’, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 36(30)

D. O’Byrne, (2007) ‘Apartheid’, in Human Rights: An Introduction, Delhi: Pearson, pp. 241-262.


R. Wasserstorm, (2006), ‘Racism, Sexism, and Preferential Treatment: An approach to the Topics’, in R. Goodin and P. Pettit, Contemporary Political Philosophy: an Anthology, Oxford: Blackwell, pp-549-574
R. Wolfrum, (1998) ‘Discrimination, Xenophobia and Racism’ in J. Symonides, Human Rights: New Dimensions and Challenges, Aldershot, Ashgate/UNESCO, pp.181-198.

b. Gender and Violence: India and Pakistan

Essential Readings:


A. Khan and R. Hussain, (2008), ‘Violence Against Women in Pakistan: Perceptions and Experiences of Domestic Violence’, Asian Studies Review, Vol. 32, pp. 239 – 253

K. Kannabiran (2012) ‘Rethinking the Constitutional Category of Sex’, in Tools of Justice: Non-Discrimination and the Indian Constitution, New Delhi, Routledge, pp.425-443

N. Menon (2012) ‘Desire’, Seeing Like a Feminist, New Delhi: Zubaan/Penguin, pp. 91-146

c. Adivasis/Aboriginals and the Land Question: Australia and India

Essential Readings:


H. Goodall, (2011) International Indigenous Community Study: Adivasi Indigenous People in India’, in A. Cadzow and J. Maynard (eds.), Aboriginal Studies, Melbourne: Nelson Cengage Learning, pp.254-259.
K. Kannabiran, (2012) ‘Adivasi Homelands and the Question of Liberty’, in Tools of Justice: Non-Discrimination and the Indian Constitution, New Delhi: Routledge, pp.242-271.
N. Watson (2011) ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Identities’ in A. Cadzow and J. Maynard (eds.), Aboriginal Studies, Melbourne: Nelson Cengage Learning, pp.43-52.
W. Fernandes (2008) ‘India's Forced Displacement Policy and Practice. Is Compensation up to its Functions?’, in M. Cernea and H. Mathus (eds), Can Compensation Prevent Impoverishment? Reforming Resettlement through Investments and Benefit-Sharing, pp. 181-207, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Additional Readings:

A. Laws and V. Iacopino, (2002) ‘Police Torture in Punjab, India: An Extended Survey’, in Health and Human Rights, Vol. 6(1), pp. 195-210


D. O’Byrne, (2007) ‘Theorizing Human Rights’, in Human Rights: An Introduction, Delhi, Pearson, pp.26-70.
J. Morsink, (1999) The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: Origins, Drafting and Intent, Philadelphia: University of Pensylvania Press, pp. ix-xiv
J. Nickel, (1987) Making Sense of Human Rights: Philosophical Reflections on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Berkeley: University of California Press.


  1. Goldman, (2005) ‘Of Treaties and Torture: How the Supreme Court Can Restrain the Executive’, in Duke Law Journal, Vol. 55(3), pp. 609-640.




  1. Tsutsui and C. Wotipka, (2004) Global Civil Society and the International Human Rights Movement: Citizen Participation in Human Rights International Nongovernmental Organizations, in Social Forces, Vol. 83(2), pp. 587-620.




  1. Rabben, (2001) Amnesty International: Myth and Reality, in Agni, No. 54, Amnesty International Fortieth Anniversary pp. 8-28




  1. Mohanty, (2010) ‘In Pursuit of People’s Rights: An Introduction’, in M. Mohanty et al., Weapon of the Oppressed: Inventory of People’s Rights in India, New Delhi: Danish Books, pp.1-11

M. Cranston, (1973) What are Human Rights? New York: Taplinger


M. Ishay, (2004) The History of Human Rights: From Ancient Times to the Globalization Era, Delhi: Orient Blackswan.
R. Sharan, (2009) ‘Alienation and Restoration of Tribal Land in Jharkhand in N Sundar (ed.) Legal Grounds, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 82-112
Text of UDHR available at http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml


  1. Baxi, (1989) ‘From Human Rights to the Right to be Human: Some Heresies’, in S. Kothari and H. Sethi (eds.), Rethinking Human Rights, Delhi: Lokayan, pp.181-166


SEMESTER-VI

2.Development Process and Social Movements in Contemporary India
Course objective: Under the influence of globalization, development processes in India have undergone transformation to produce spaces of advantage and disadvantage and new geographies of power. The high social reproduction costs and dispossession of vulnerable social groups involved in such a development strategy condition new theatres of contestation and struggles. A variety of protest movements emerged to interrogate and challenge this development paradigm that evidently also weakens the democratic space so very vital to the formulation of critical consensus. This course proposes to introduce students to the conditions, contexts and forms of political contestation over development paradigms and their bearing on the retrieval of democratic voice of citizens.
Unit-I

I. Development Process since Independence (2 weeks) a. State and planning


  1. Liberalization and reforms

Unit-II

II. Industrial Development Strategy and its Impact on the Social Structure (2 weeks)

  1. Mixed economy, privatization, the impact on organized and unorganized labour




  1. Emergence of the new middle class

Unit-III

III. Agrarian Development Strategy and its Impact on the Social Structure (2weeks)

  1. Land Reforms, Green Revolution




  1. Agrarian crisis since the 1990s and its impact on farmers

Unit-IV

IV. Social Movements (Ancient)

Unit-V

Social Movement (Modern)

  1. Tribal, Peasant, Dalit and Women's movements



Unit-V


  1. Civil rights movements


READING LIST

I. The Development Process since Independence

Essential Readings:




  1. Mozoomdar, (1994) ‘The Rise and Decline of Development Planning in India’, in T. Byres (ed.) The State and Development Planning in India. Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 73-108.




  1. Varshney, (2010) ‘Mass Politics or Elite Politics? Understanding the Politics of India’s Economic Reforms’ in R. Mukherji (ed.) India’s Economic Transition: The Politics of Reforms, Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp 146-169.

P. Chatterjee, (2000) ‘Development Planning and the Indian State’, in Zoya Hasan (ed.), Politics and the State in India, New Delhi: Sage, pp.116-140.


P. Patnaik and C. Chandrasekhar, (2007) ‘India: Dirigisme, Structural Adjustment, and the Radical Alternative’, in B. Nayar (ed.), Globalization and Politics in India. Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 218-240.
P. Bardhan, (2005) ‘Epilogue on the Political Economy of Reform in India’, in The Political Economy of Development in India. 6th impression, Delhi: Oxford University Press.
T. Singh, (1979) ‘The Planning Process and Public Process: a Reassessment’, R. R. Kale Memorial Lecture, Pune: Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics.


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