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Political: Debates on Sovereignty and Territoriality



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Political: Debates on Sovereignty and Territoriality

Essential Readings:

A. Heywood, (2011) Global Politics, New York: Palgrave-McMillan, pp. 112-134.
R. Keohane, (2000) ‘Sovereignty in International Society’, in D. Held and A. McGrew (eds.) The Global Trans-Formations Reader, Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 109-123.
Additional Reading:
K. Shimko, (2005) International Relations: Perspectives and Controversies, New York: Houghton Mifflin, pp. 195-219.
Global Economy: Its Significance and Anchors of Global Political Economy: IMF, World Bank, WTO, TNCs

Essential Readings:

A. Heywood, (2011) Global Politics, New York: Palgrave-McMillan, pp. 454-479.
T. Cohn, (2009) Global Political Economy: Theory and Practice, pp. 130-140 (IMF), 208-218 (WTO).

R. Picciotto, (2003) ‘A New World Bank for a New Century’, in C. Roe Goddard et al.,


International Political: State-Market Relations in a Changing Global Order, Boulder: Lynne Reinner, pp. 341-351.
A. Narlikar, (2005) The World Trade Organization: A Very Short Introduction, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 22-98.

J. Goldstein, (2006) International Relations, New Delhi: Pearson, pp. 392-405 (MNC).


P. Hirst, G. Thompson and S. Bromley, (2009) Globalization in Question, Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 68-100 (MNC).

Additional Readings:

G. Ritzer, (2010) Globalization: A Basic Text, Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 180-190.
F. Lechner and J. Boli (ed.), (2004) The Globalization Reader, London: Blackwell, pp. 236-239 (WTO).
D. Held et al, (1999) Global Transformations: Politics, Economics and Culture, California: Stanford University Press, pp. 242-282 (MNC).

T. Cohn, (2009) Global Political Economy, New Delhi: Pearson, pp. 250-323 (MNC).


Cultural and Technological Dimension

Essential Readings:


D. Held and A. McGrew (eds.), (2002) Global Transformations Reader: Politics, Economics and Culture, Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 1-50; 84-91.
M. Steger, (2009) ‘Globalization: A Contested Concept’, in Globalization: A Very Short Introduction, London: Oxford University Press, pp. 1-16.
A. Appadurai, (2000) ‘Grassroots Globalization and the Research Imagination’, in Public Culture, Vol. 12(1), pp. 1-19.
Additional Reading:
J. Beynon and D. Dunkerley, (eds.), (2012) Globalisation: The Reader, New Delhi: Rawat Publications, pp. 1-19.
A. Vanaik, (ed.), (2004) Globalization and South Asia: Multidimensional Perspectives, New Delhi: Manohar Publications, pp. 171-191, 192-213, 301-317, 335-357.

Global Resistances (Global Social Movements and NGOs)

Essential Readings:

G. Ritzer, (2010) Globalization: A Basic Text, Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 487-504.
R. O’Brien et al., (2000) Contesting Global Governance: Multilateral Economic Institutions and Global Social Movements, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-23.

J. Fisher, (1998) Non-Governments: NGOs and Political Development in the Third World,

Connecticut: Kumarian Press, pp. 1- 37 (NGO).
Additional Readings:
G. Laxter and S. Halperin (eds.), (2003) Global Civil Society and Its Limits, New York: Palgrave, pp. 1-21.

A. Heywood, (2011) Global Politics, New York: Palgrave-McMillan, pp. 150-156 (NGO).


P. Willets, (2011) ‘Trans-National Actors and International Organizations in Global Politics’, in J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens (eds.) Globalization of World Politics, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 334-342. (NGO)

II. Contemporary Global Issues
Ecological Issues: Historical Overview of International Environmental Agreements, Climate Change, Global Commons Debate

Essential Readings:


J. Volger, (2011) ‘Environmental Issues’, in J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens (eds.) Globalization of World Politics, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 348-362.

A. Heywood, (2011) Global Politics, New York: Palgrave, pp. 383-411.


N. Carter, (2007) The Politics of Environment: Ideas, Activism, Policy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 13-81.
Additional Readings:
P. Bidwai, (2011) ‘Durban: Road to Nowhere’, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol.46, No. 53, December, pp. 10-12.
K.Shimko, (2005) International Relations Perspectives and Controversies, New York: Hughton-Mifflin, pp. 317-339.
Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

Essential Readings:


D. Howlett, (2011) ‘Nuclear Proliferation’, in J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens (eds.) Globalization of World Politics, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 384-397.
P. Viotti and M. Kauppi, (2007) International Relations and World Politics: Security, Economy and Identity, New Delhi: Pearson, pp. 238-272.
Additional Reading:

A. Heywood, (2011) Global Politics, New York: Palgrave, pp. 264-281.


International Terrorism: Non-State Actors and State Terrorism; Post 9/11 developments

Essential Readings:

P. Viotti and M. Kauppi, (2007) International Relations, New Delhi: Pearson, pp. 276-307.


  1. Heywood, (2011) Global Politics, New York: Palgrave, pp. 282-301. Additional Readings:




  1. Kiras, (2011) ‘Terrorism and Globalization’, in J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens (eds.) Globalization of World Politics, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 366-380.

  1. Vanaik, (2007) Masks of Empire, New Delhi: Tulika, pp. 103-128.



Migration

Essential Readings:

G. Ritzer, (2010) Globalization: A Basic Text, Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 298-322.
S. Castles, (2012) ‘Global Migration’, in B. Chimni and S. Mallavarapu (eds.) International Relations: Perspectives For the Global South, New Delhi: Pearson, pp. 272-285.
Human Security

Essential Readings:




  1. Acharya, (2011) ‘Human Security’, in J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens (eds.) Globalization of World Politics, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 480-493.




  1. Tadjbakhsh and A. Chenoy, (2007) Human Security, London: Routledge, pp. 13-19; 123-127; 236-243.

Additional Reading:




  1. Acharya, (2001) ‘Human Security: East versus West’, in International Journal, Vol. 56, no. 3, pp. 442-460.


III. Global Shifts: Power and Governance

Essential Readings:


J. Rosenau, (1992) ‘Governance, Order, and Change in World Politics’, in J. Rosenau, and E. Czempiel (eds.) Governance without Government: Order and Change in World Politics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-29.
A. Kumar and D. Messner (eds), (2010) Power Shifts and Global Governance: Challenges from South and North, London: Anthem Press.
P. Dicken, (2007) Global Shift: Mapping the Changing Contours of the World Economy, New York: The Guilford Press.
J. Close, (2001) ‘The Global Shift: A quantum leap in human evolution’, Available at http://www.stir-global-shift.com/page22.php, Accessed: 19.04.2013.
SEMESTER-V

5.1 Paper XI- Classical Political Philosophy
Course objective: This course goes back to Greek antiquity and familiarizes students with the manner in which the political questions were first posed. Machiavelli comes as an interlude inaugurating modern politics followed by Hobbes and Locke. This is a basic foundation course for students.


  1. Text and Interpretation (2 weeks)


Unit-I

II. Antiquity Plato (2 weeks)
Philosophy and Politics, Theory of Forms, Justice, Philosopher King/Queen, Communism Presentation theme: Critique of Democracy; Women and Guardianship, Censorship.
Unit-II

Antiquity

Aristotle (2 weeks)

Forms, Virtue, Citizenship, Justice, State and Household

Presentation themes: Classification of governments; man as zoon politikon

Unit-III

III. Intelude:

Machiavelli (2 weeks)

Virtu, Religion, Republicanism

Presentation themes: morality and statecraft; vice and virtue
Unit-IV
IV. Possessive Individualism Hobbes (2 weeks)

Human nature, State of Nature, Social Contract, State

Presentation themes: State of nature; social contract; Leviathan; atomistic individuals.
Unit-V

Limited Government
Locke (2 weeks)

Laws of Nature, Natural Rights, Property,

Presentation themes: Natural rights; right to dissent; justification of property
READING LIST

I. Text and Interpretation

Essential Readings:


T. Ball, (2004) ‘History and Interpretation’ in C. Kukathas and G. Gaus, (eds.) Handbook of Political Theory, London: Sage Publications Ltd. pp. 18-30.
B. Constant, (1833) ‘The Liberty of the Ancients Compared with that of the Moderns’, in D. Boaz, (ed), (1997) The Libertarian Reader, New York: The Free Press.

Additional Readings:


J. Coleman, (2000) ‘Introduction’, in A History of Political Thought: From Ancient Greece to Early Christianity, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, pp. 1-20.
Q. Skinner, (2010) ‘Preface’, in The Foundations of Modern Political Thought Volume I,

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press pp. ix-xv.


II. Antiquity: Plato

Essential Readings:


A. Skoble and T. Machan, (2007) Political Philosophy: Essential Selections. New Delhi: Pearson Education, pp. 9-32.
R. Kraut, (1996) ‘Introduction to the study of Plato’, in R. Kraut (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Plato. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-50.
C. Reeve, (2009) ‘Plato’, in D. Boucher and P. Kelly, (eds) Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 62-80
Additional Readings:
S. Okin, (1992) ‘Philosopher Queens and Private Wives’, in S. Okin Women in Western Political Thought, Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp. 28-50
R. Kraut, (1996) ‘The Defence of Justice in Plato's Republic’, in R. Kraut (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Plato. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 311-337

T. Saunders, (1996) ‘Plato's Later Political Thought’, in R. Kraut (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Plato. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 464-492.


Aristotle

Essential Readings:


A. Skoble and T. Machan, (2007) Political Philosophy: Essential Selections. New Delhi: Pearson Education, pp. 53-64.
T. Burns, (2009) ‘Aristotle’, in D. Boucher, and P. Kelly, (eds) Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp.81-99.
C. Taylor, (1995) ‘Politics’, in J. Barnes (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 232-258
Additional Readings:
J. Coleman, (2000) ‘Aristotle’, in J. Coleman A History of Political Thought: From Ancient Greece to Early Christianity, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, pp.120-186
D. Hutchinson, (1995) ‘Ethics’, in J. Barnes, (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 195-232.

III. Interlude:

Machiavelli

Essential Readings:




  1. Skoble and T. Machan, (2007) Political Philosophy: Essential Selections. New Delhi: Pearson Education, pp. 124-130




  1. Skinner, (2000) ‘The Adviser to Princes’,

in Machiavelli: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 23-53
J. Femia, (2009) ‘Machiavelli’, in D. Boucher, and P. Kelly, (eds) Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 163-184
Additional Reading:
Q. Skinner, (2000) ‘The Theorist of Liberty’, in Machiavelli: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 54-87.
IV. Possessive Individualism Hobbes
Essential Readings:
A. Skoble and T. Machan, (2007) Political Philosophy: Essential Selections. New Delhi: Pearson Education pp. 131-157.

D. Baumgold, (2009) ‘Hobbes’, in D. Boucher and P. Kelly (eds) Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 189-206.


C. Macpherson (1962) The Political Theory of Possessive Individualism: Hobbes to Locke. Oxford University Press, Ontario, pp. 17-29.
Additional Readings:
I. Hampsher-Monk, (2001) ‘Thomas Hobbes’, in A History of Modern Political Thought: Major Political Thinkers from Hobbes to Marx, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, pp. 1-67.
A. Ryan, (1996) ‘Hobbes's political philosophy’, in T. Sorell, (ed.) Cambridge Companion to Hobbes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 208-245.
Locke

Essential Readings:


A. Skoble and T. Machan, (2007) Political Philosophy: Essential Selections. New Delhi: Pearson Education, pp. 181-209.
J. Waldron, (2009) ‘John Locke’, in D. Boucher and P. Kelly, (eds) Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 207-224
C. Macpherson, (1962) The Political Theory of Possessive Individualism: Hobbes to Locke. Oxford University Press, Ontario, pp. 194-214.
Additional Readings:
R. Ashcraft, (1999) ‘Locke's Political Philosophy’, in V. Chappell (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Locke, Cambridge. Cambridge University Press, pp. 226-251.
I. Hampsher-Monk, (2001) A History of Modern Political Thought: Major Political Thinkers from Hobbes to Marx, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, pp. 69-116


5.2 Paper XII- Indian Political Thought-I
Course objective: This course introduces the specific elements of Indian Political Thought spanning over two millennia. The basic focus of study is on individual thinkers whose ideas are however framed by specific themes. The course as a whole is meant to provide a sense of the broad streams of Indian thought while encouraging a specific knowledge of individual thinkers and texts. Selected extracts from some original texts are also given to discuss in class. The list of additional readings is meant for teachers as well as the more interested students.

Unit-I

I. Traditions of Pre-colonial Indian Political Thought (8 lectures)

  1. Brahmanic and Shramanic




  1. Islamic and Syncretic.

Unit-II

II. Ved Vyasa (Shantiparva): Rajadharma (5 lectures)
III. Manu: Social Laws (6 lectures)

Unit-III

IV. Kautilya: Theory of State (7 lectures)



Unit-IV

V. Aggannasutta (Digha Nikaya): Theory of kingship (5 lectures)
VI. Barani: Ideal Polity (6 lectures)

Unit-V

VII. Abul Fazal: Monarchy (6 lectures)
VIII. Kabir: Syncretism (5 lectures)
READING LIST
I .Traditions of Pre-modern Indian Political Thought:

Essential Readings:


B. Parekh, (1986) ‘Some Reflections on the Hindu Tradition of Political Thought’, in T. Pantham, and K. Deutsch (eds.), Political Thought in Modern India, New Delhi: Sage Publications, pp. 17- 31.
A. Altekar, (1958) ‘The Kingship’, in State and Government in Ancient India, 3rd edition, Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, pp. 75-108.
M. Shakir, (1986) ‘Dynamics of Muslim Political Thought’, in T. Pantham, and K. Deutsch (eds.), Political Thought in Modern India, New Delhi: Sage Publications, pp. 142- 160
G. Pandey, (1978) Sraman Tradition: Its History and Contribution to Indian Culture,

Ahmedabad: L. D. Institute of Indology, pp. 52-73.


S. Saberwal, (2008) ‘Medieval Legacy’, in Spirals of Contention, New Delhi: Routledge, pp.1-31
II. Ved Vyasa (Shantiparva): Rajadharma

Essential Readings:


The Mahabharata (2004), Vol. 7 (Book XI and Book XII, Part II), Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.
V. Varma, (1974) Studies in Hindu Political Thought and Its Metaphysical Foundations, Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, pp. 211- 230.
B. Chaturvedi, (2006) ‘Dharma-The Foundation of Raja-Dharma, Law and Governance’, in

The Mahabharta: An Inquiry in the Human Condition, Delhi: Orient Longman, pp. 418- 464.
III. Manu: Social Laws

Essential Readings:


Manu, (2006) ‘Rules for Times of Adversity’, in P. Olivelle, (ed. & trans.) Manu’s Code of Law: A Critical Edition and Translation of the Manava- Dharamsastra, New Delhi: OUP, pp. 208-213.

V. Mehta, (1992) ‘The Cosmic Vision: Manu’, in Foundations of Indian Political Thought, Delhi: Manohar, pp. 23- 39.


R. Sharma, ( 1991) ‘Varna in Relation to Law and Politics (c 600 BC-AD 500)’, in Aspects of Political Ideas and Institutions in Ancient India, Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, pp. 233- 251.
P. Olivelle, (2006) ‘Introduction’, in Manu’s Code of Law: A Critical Edition and Translation of the Manava –Dharmasastra, Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 3- 50.
IV. Kautilya: Theory of State

Essential Readings:


Kautilya, (1997) ‘The Elements of Sovereignty’ in R. Kangle (ed. and trns.), Arthasastra of Kautilya, New Delhi: Motilal Publishers, pp. 511- 514.
V. Mehta, (1992) ‘The Pragmatic Vision: Kautilya and His Successor’, in Foundations of Indian Political Thought, Delhi: Manohar, pp. 88- 109.
R. Kangle, (1997) Arthashastra of Kautilya-Part-III: A Study, Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, rpt., pp. 116- 142.
Additional Reading:
J. Spellman, (1964) ‘Principle of Statecraft’, in Political Theory of Ancient India: A Study of Kingship from the Earliest time to Ceirca AD 300, Oxford: Clarendon Press, pp. 132- 170.
V. Agganna Sutta (Digha Nikaya): Theory of Kingship

Essential Readings:


S. Collins, (ed), (2001) Agganna Sutta: An Annotated Translation, New Delhi: Sahitya Academy, pp. 44-49.
S. Collins, (2001) ‘General Introduction’, in Agganna Sutta: The Discussion on What is Primary (An Annotated Translation from Pali), Delhi: Sahitya Akademi, pp. 1- 26.
B. Gokhale, (1966) ‘The Early Buddhist View of the State’, in The Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. XXVI, (1), pp. 15- 22.
Additional Reading:
L. Jayasurya, ‘Budhism, Politics and Statecraft’, Available at ftp.buddhism.org/Publications/.../Voll1_03_Laksiri%20Jayasuriya.pdf,Accessed: 19.04.2013.
VI. Barani: Ideal Polity

Essential Reading:


I. Habib, (1998) ‘Ziya Barni’s Vision of the State’, in The Medieval History Journal, Vol. 2, (1), pp. 19- 36.
Additional Reading:

M. Alam, (2004) ‘Sharia Akhlaq’, in The Languages of Political Islam in India 1200- 1800,

Delhi: Permanent Black, pp. 26- 43
VII. Abul Fazal: Monarchy

Essential Readings:


A. Fazl, (1873) The Ain-i Akbari (translated by H. Blochmann), Calcutta: G. H. Rouse, pp. 47-57.

V. Mehta, (1992) ‘The Imperial Vision: Barni and Fazal’, in Foundations of Indian Political Thought, Delhi: Manohar, pp. 134- 156.


Additional Readings:
M. Alam, (2004) ‘Sharia in Naserean Akhlaq’, in Languages of Political Islam in India1200-1800, Delhi: Permanent Black, pp. 46- 69.
I. Habib, (1998) ‘Two Indian Theorist of The State: Barani and Abul Fazal’, in Proceedings of the Indian History Congress. Patiala, pp. 15- 39.
VIII. Kabir: Syncreticism

Essential Readings:


Kabir. (2002) The Bijak of Kabir, (translated by L. Hess and S. Singh), Delhi: Oxford University Press, No. 30, 97, pp. 50- 51 & 69- 70.
V. Mehta, (1992) Foundation of Indian Political Thought, Delhi: Manohar, pp. 157- 183.
G. Omvedt, (2008) ‘Kabir and Ravidas, Envisioning Begumpura’, in Seeking Begumpura: The Social Vision of Anti Caste Intellectual, Delhi: Navayana, pp. 91- 107.
Additional Reading:
L. Hess and S. Singh, (2002) ‘Introduction’, in The Bijak of Kabir, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 3- 35.


SEMESTER-VI

6.1 Paper XIII- Modern Political Philosophy
Course objective: Philosophy and politics are closely intertwined. We explore this convergence by identifying four main tendencies here. Students will be exposed to the manner in which the questions of politics have been posed in terms that have implications for larger questions of thought and existence.
Unit-I

I. Modernity and its discourses (8 lectures)
This section will introduce students to the idea of modernity and the discourses around modernity. Two essential readings have been prescribed.

Unit-II

II. Romantics (16 lectures)

a. Jean Jacques Rousseau (8 Lectures)


Presentation themes: General Will; local or direct democracy; self-government; origin of inequality.
b. Mary Wollstonecraft (8 Lectures)
Presentation themes: Women and paternalism; critique of Rousseau’s idea of education; legal rights


Unit-III

III. Liberal socialist (8 lectures) a. John Stuart Mill
Presentation themes: Liberty, suffrage and subjection of women, right of minorities; utility principle.

Unit-IV

IV. Radicals (16 lectures) a. Karl Marx
Presentation themes: Alienation; difference with other kinds of materialism; class struggle.

Radicals


Unit-V

b. Lenin
Reading List



I. Modernity and its discourses

Essential Readings:


I. Kant. (1784) ‘What is Enlightenment?,’ available at http://theliterarylink.com/kant.html, Accessed: 19.04.2013
S. Hall (1992) ‘Introduction’, in Formations of Modernity UK: Polity Press pages 1-16
II. Romantics

Essential Readings:

B. Nelson, (2008) Western Political Thought. New York: Pearson Longman, pp. 221-255.
M. Keens-Soper, (2003) ‘Jean Jacques Rousseau: The Social Contract’, in M. Forsyth and M. Keens-Soper, (eds) A Guide to the Political Classics: Plato to Rousseau. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 171-202.
C. Jones, (2002) ‘Mary Wollstonecraft’s Vindications and their Political Tradition’ in C. Johnson, (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 42-58.
S. Ferguson, (1999) ‘The Radical Ideas of Mary Wollstonecraft’, in Canadian Journal of Political Science XXXII (3), pp. 427-50, Available at http://digitalcommons.ryerson.ca/politics, Accessed: 19.04.2013.

III. Liberal Socialist

Essential Readings:


H. Magid, (1987) ‘John Stuart Mill’, in L. Strauss and J. Cropsey, (eds), History of Political Philosophy, 2nd edition. Chicago: Chicago University Press, pp. 784-801.
P. Kelly, (2003) ‘J.S. Mill on Liberty’, in D. Boucher, and P. Kelly, (eds.) Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 324-359.

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