Choice based credit system


VII. Changing Nature of the Indian State



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VII. Changing Nature of the Indian State: Developmental, Welfare and Coercive

Dimensions

Essential Readings:


S. Palshikar, (2008) ‘The Indian State: Constitution and Beyond’, in R. Bhargava (ed.) Politics and Ethics of the Indian Constitution, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 143-163.
R. Deshpande, (2005) ‘State and Democracy in India: Strategies of Accommodation and Manipulation’, Occasional Paper, Series III, No. 4, Special Assistance Programme, Department of Politics and Public Administration, University of Pune.
M. Mohanty, (1989) ‘Duality of the State Process in India: A Hypothesis’, Bhartiya Samajik Chintan, Vol. XII (1-2)
Additional Readings:
T. Byres, (1994) ‘Introduction: Development Planning and the Interventionist State Versus Liberalization and the Neo-Liberal State: India, 1989-1996’, in T. Byres (ed.) The State, Development Planning and Liberalization in India, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1994, pp.1-35.


  1. Verma, (2007) ‘Police Agencies and Coercive Power’, in S. Ganguly, L. Diamond and M. Plattner (eds.) The State of India’s Democracy, Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, pp. 130-139.


SEMESTER-III

3.1 Paper V- Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics (100(80+20)

Course objective: This is a foundational course in comparative politics. The purpose is to familiarize students with the basic concepts and approaches to the study of comparative politics. More specifically the course will focus on examining politics in a historical framework while engaging with various themes of comparative analysis in developed and developing countries.

Unit-I

I. Understanding Comparative Politics

  1. Evolution,Nature and scope




  1. Going beyond Euro centrism

Unit-II

II. Historical context of modern government

  1. Capitalism: meaning and development: globalization




  1. Socialism: meaning, growth and development

Historical context of modern government

Unit-III


  1. Colonialism and decolonization: meaning, context, forms of colonialism; anti-colonialism struggles and process of decolonization

Unit-IV

III. Themes for comparative analysis

A comparative study of constitutional developments and political economy in Britain, Brazil

Themes for comparative analysis

A comparative study of constitutional developments and political economy in the

Nigeria and China.


  1. Understanding Comparative Politics

Essential Readings:




  1. Kopstein, and M. Lichbach, (eds), (2005) Comparative Politics: Interests, Identities, and Institutions in a Changing Global Order. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp.1-5; 16-36; 253-290.




  1. Mohanty, (1975) ‘Comparative Political Theory and Third World Sensitivity’, in Teaching Politics, Nos. 1 and 2, pp. 22-38

Additional Readings:




  1. Roy, (2001) ‘Comparative Method and Strategies of Comparison’, in Punjab Journal of Politics. Vol. xxv (2), pp. 1-15.




  1. Blondel, (1996) ‘Then and Now: Comparative Politics’, in Political Studies. Vol. 47 (1), pp. 152-160.




  1. Chandhoke, (1996) ‘Limits of Comparative Political Analysis ‘, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 31 (4), January 27, pp.PE 2-PE2-PE8

II Historical context of modern government a. Capitalism

Essential Readings:


R. Suresh, (2010) Economy & Society -Evolution of Capitalism, New Delhi, Sage Publications, pp. 151-188; 235-268.
G. Ritzer, (2002) ‘Globalization and Related Process I: Imperialism, Colonialism, Development, Westernization, Easternization’, in Globalization: A Basic Text. London: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 63-84.

Additional Readings:


M. Dobb, (1950) ‘Capitalism’, in Studies in the Development of Capitalism. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd, pp. 1-32.
E. Wood, (2002) ‘The Agrarian origin of Capitalism’, in Origin of Capitalism: A Long View. London: Verso, pp. 91-95; 166-181.
A. Hoogvelt, (2002) ‘History of Capitalism Expansion’, in Globalization and Third World Politics. London: Palgrave, pp. 14-28.

b. Socialism

Essential Readings:


A. Brown, (2009) ‘The Idea of Communism’, in Rise and Fall of Communism, Harpercollins (e-book), pp. 1-25; 587-601.
J. McCormick, (2007) ‘Communist and Post-Communist States’, in Comparative Politics in Transition, United Kingdom: Wadsworth, pp. 195-209

Additional Readings:


R. Meek, (1957) ‘The Definition of Socialism: A Comment’, The Economic Journal. 67 (265), pp. 135-139.

c. Colonialism, decolonization& postcolonial society

Essential Readings:


P. Duara, (2004) ‘Introduction: The Decolonization of Asia and Africa in the Twentieth Century’, in P. Duara, (ed), Decolonization: Perspective From Now and Then. London: Routledge, pp. 1-18.
J. Chiryankandath, (2008) ‘Colonialism and Post-Colonial Development’, in P. Burnell, et. al, Politics in the Developing World. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 31-52.

Additional Reading:


M. Mohanty, (1999) ‘Colonialism and Discourse in India and China’, Available at http://www.ignca.nic.in/ks_40033.html http, Accessed: 24.03.2011.

III. Themes for Comparative Analysis

Essential Reading:




  1. Barrington et. al (2010) Comparative Politics - Structures & Choices, Boston, Wadsworth, pp. 212-13; 71-76; 84-89.




  1. Grant, (2009) ‘United Kingdom Parliamentary System’ in The UK Parliament. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, pp. 24-43




  1. McCormick, (2007) Comparative Politics in Transition, UK: Wadsworth, pp. 260-270 (China)




  1. Kesselman, J. Krieger and William (2010), Introduction to Comparative Politics: Political Challenges and Changing Agendas, UK: Wadsworth. pp. 47-70 (Britain); 364- 388 (Nigeria); 625-648 (China); 415-440 (Brazil).

Additional Reading:


P. Rutland, (2007) ‘Britain’, in J. Kopstein and M. Lichbach. (eds.) Comparative Politics: Interest, Identities and Institutions in a Changing Global Order. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 39-79.

3.2 PERSPECTIVES ON PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION



Objective: The course provides an introduction to the discipline of public administration. This paper encompasses public administration in its historical context with an emphasis on the various classical and contemporary administrative theories. The course also explores some of the recent trends, including feminism and ecological conservation and how the call for greater democratization is restructuring public administration. The course will also attempt to provide the students a comprehensive understanding on contemporary administrative developments.
Unit-I

    1. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AS A DISCIPLINE [15 lectures]

  • Meaning, Dimensions and Significance of the Discipline




  • Public and Private Administration




  • Evolution of Public Administration

Unit-II
II. THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES [ 25 lectures ]

CLASSICAL THEORIES

  • Scientific management (F.W.Taylor)

  • Administrative Management (Gullick, Urwick and Fayol)




  • Ideal-type bureaucracy (Max Weber)

Unit-III

NEO-CLASSICAL THEORIES

  • Human relations theory (Elton Mayo)




  • Rational decision-making (Herbert Simon)

CONTEMPORARY THEORIES

  • Ecological approach (Fred Riggs)




  • Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Peter Drucker)

Unit-IV

III. PUBLIC POLICY [ 10 lectures ]

  • Concept, relevance and approaches




  • Formulation, implementation and evaluation

Unit-V

IV. MAJOR APPROACHES IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION [ 20 lectures ]

  • New Public Administration




  • New Public Management




  • New Public Service Approach




  • Good Governance




  • Feminist Perspectives

READINGS
I. Public Administration as a Discipline

Meaning, Dimensions and Significance of the Discipline.

Nicholas Henry, Public Administration and Public Affairs, Prentice Hall, 1999


D. Rosenbloom, R. Kravchuk. and R. Clerkin, (2009) Public Administration: Understanding Management, Politics and Law in Public Sector, 7th edition, New Delhi: McGraw Hill, pp. 1-40
W. Wilson, (2004) ‘The Study of Administration’, in B. Chakrabarty and M. Bhattacharya (eds), Administrative Change and Innovation: a Reader, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 85-101

b. Public and Private Administration.
M. Bhattacharya, (2008) New Horizons of Public Administration, 5th Revised Edition. New Delhi: Jawahar Publishers, pp. 37-44.
G. Alhson, (1997) ‘Public and Private Management’, in Shafritz, J. and Hyde, A. (eds.) Classics of Public Administration, 4th Edition. Forth Worth: Hartcourt Brace, TX, pp. 510-529.

Evolution of Public Administration

N. Henry,Public Administration and Public Affairs, 12th edition. New Jersey: Pearson,2013

M.Bhattacharya,Restructuring Public Administration: A New Look, New Delhi: Jawahar
Publishers, 2012
P.Dunleavy and C.Hood, “From Old Public Administration to New Public Management”,
Public Money and Management, Vol. XIV No-3, 1994
M. Bhattacharya, New Horizons of Public Administration, New Delhi: Jawahar Publishers, 2011
Basu, Rumki, Public Administration : Concepts and Theories Sterling Publishers, New Delhi 2014

II. Theoretical Perspectives Scientific Management

D. Gvishiani, Organisation and Management, Moscow: Progress Publishers, 1972


F. Taylor, ‘Scientific Management’, in J. Shafritz, and A. Hyde, (eds.) Classics of Public Administration, 5th Edition. Belmont: Wadsworth, 2004
P. Mouzelis, ‘The Ideal Type of Bureaucracy’ in B. Chakrabarty, And M. Bhattacharya, (eds), Public Administration: A Reader, New Delhi: Oxford University Press,2003

Administrative Management


  1. Ravindra Prasad, Y. Pardhasaradhi, V. S. Prasad and P. Satyrnarayana, [eds.], Administrative Thinkers, Sterling Publishers, 2010




  1. J. Ferreira, A. W. Erasmus and D. Groenewald , Administrative Management, Juta Academics, 2010


Ideal Type-Bureaucracy


  1. Weber,‘Bureaucracy’, in C. Mills, and H. Gerth, From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1946

Warren. G.Bennis, Beyond Bureaucracy, Mc Graw Hill, 1973
Human Relations Theory

D. Gvishiani, Organisation and Management, Moscow: Progress Publishers, 1972


B. Miner, ‘Elton Mayo and Hawthrone’, in Organisational Behaviour 3: Historical Origins and the Future. New York: M.E. Sharpe, 2006

Rational-Decision Making

S. Maheshwari, Administrative Thinkers, New Delhi: Macmillan, 2009


Fredrickson and Smith, ‘Decision Theory’, in The Public Administration Theory Primer. Cambridge: Westview Press, 2003

Ecological approach
R. Arora, ‘Riggs’ Administrative Ecology’ in B. Chakrabarty and M. Bhattacharya (eds), Public Administration: A reader, New Delhi, Oxford University Press, 2003
A. Singh, Public Administration: Roots and Wings. New Delhi: Galgotia Publishing Company, 2002
F. Riggs, Administration in Developing Countries: The Theory of Prismatic Society. Boston: Houghton Miffin,1964

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Peter Drucker, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Harper Collins,1999

Peter F. Drucker , The Practice of Management, Harper Collins, 2006

III. Public Policy



Concept, Relevance and Approaches

T. Dye, (1984) Understanding Public Policy, 5th Edition. U.S.A: Prentice Hall, pp. 1-44



The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy ,OUP,2006
Xun Wu, M.Ramesh, Michael Howlett and Scott Fritzen ,The Public Policy Primer: Managing The Policy Process, Rutledge, 2010
Mary Jo Hatch and Ann .L. Cunliffe Organisation Theory : Modern, Symbolic and Postmodern Perspectives, Oxford University Press,2006
Michael Howlett, Designing Public Policies : Principles And Instruments, Rutledge, 2011 The Oxford Handbook Of Public Policy, Oxford University Press, 2006
Formulation, implementation and evaluation


Prabir Kumar De, Public Policy and Systems, Pearson Education, 2012

R.V. Vaidyanatha Ayyar, Public Policy Making In India, Pearson,2009
Surendra Munshi and Biju Paul Abraham [Eds.] Good Governance, Democratic Societies And Globalisation, Sage Publishers, 2004
IV. Major Approaches in Public Administration a. Development administration
M. Bhattacharya, ‘Chapter 2 and 4’, in Social Theory, Development Administration and Development Ethics, New Delhi: Jawahar Publishers, 2006
F. Riggs,The Ecology of Public Administration, Part 3, New Delhi: Asia Publishing House, 1961


  1. New Public Administration

Essential Reading:


M. Bhattacharya, Public Administration: Issues and Perspectives, New Delhi: Jawahar Publishers, 2012
H. Frederickson, ‘Toward a New Public Administration’, in J. Shafritz, & A. Hyde, (eds.) Classics of Public Administration, 5th Edition, Belmont: Wadsworth, 2004


  1. New Public Management

U. Medury, Public administration in the Globalization Era, New Delhi: Orient Black Swan, 2010


A. Gray, and B. Jenkins, ‘From Public Administration to Public Management’ in E. Otenyo and N. Lind, (eds.) Comparative Public Administration: The Essential Readings: Oxford University Press, 1997
C. Hood, ‘A Public Management for All Seasons’, in J. Shafritz, & A. Hyde, (eds.) Classics of Public Administration, 5th Edition, Belmont: Wadsworth, 2004
d. New Public Service Approach
R.B.Denhart & J.V.Denhart [Arizona State University] “ The New Public Service: Serving Rathet Than Steering”, in Public Administration Review ,Volume 60, No-6,November-December 2000
e. Good Governance
A. Leftwich, ‘Governance in the State and the Politics of Development’, in Development and Change. Vol. 25,1994

M. Bhattacharya, ‘Contextualizing Governance and Development’ in B. Chakrabarty and


M. Bhattacharya, (eds.) The Governance Discourse. New Delhi: Oxford University Press,1998 B. Chakrabarty, Reinventing Public Administration: The India Experience. New Delhi: Orient Longman, 2007
U. Medury, Public administration in the Globalisation Era, New Delhi: Orient Black Swan, 2010
f. Feminist Perspective
Camila Stivers, Gender Images In Public Administration, California : Sage Publishers,2002 Radha Kumar, The History of Doing, New Delhi: Kali For Women, 1998

Sylvia Walby, Theorising Patriarchy, Oxford, Basil Blackwell.1997


Amy. S. Wharton, The Sociology Of Gender, West Sussex : Blackwell-Wiley Publishers,2012 Nivedita Menon [ed.], Gender and Politics, Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1999

Simone De Beauvoir, The Second Sex, London: Picador, 1988


Alison Jaggar, Feminist Politics And Human Nature, Brighton: Harvester Press,1983 Maxine Molyneux and Shahra Razavi , Gender, Justice, Development and Rights ,Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002

3.3 Paper VII- Perspectives on International Relations and World History
Course Objective: This paper seeks to equip students with the basic intellectual tools for understanding International Relations. It introduces students to some of the most important theoretical approaches for studying international relations. The course begins by historically contextualizing the evolution of the international state system before discussing the agency-structure problem through the levels-of-analysis approach. After having set the parameters of the debate, students are introduced to different theories in International Relations. It provides a fairly comprehensive overview of the major political developments and events starting from the twentieth century. Students are expected to learn about the key milestones in world history and equip them with the tools to understand and analyze the same from different perspectives. A key objective of the course is to make students aware of the implicit Euro - centricism of International Relations by highlighting certain specific perspectives from the Global South.
Unit-I

A. Studying International Relations (15 Lectures)
i.How do you understand International Relations: Levels of Analysis (3 lectures) ii.History and IR: Emergence of the International State System (2 Lectures) iii.Pre-Westphalia and Westphalia (5 lectures)

Iv.Post-Westphalia (5 lectures)


Unit-II

  1. Theoretical Perspectives (25 Lectures)

    1. Classical Realism & Neo-Realism (6 lectures)

      1. Liberalism & Neoliberalism (5 lectures)

Unit-III

Theoretical Perspectives


      1. Marxist Approaches (5 lectures)




      1. Feminist Perspectives (4 lectures)




    1. Eurocentricism and Perspectives from the Global South (5 Lectures)

Unit-IV

  1. An Overview of Twentieth Century IR History (20 Lectures)

    1. World War I: Causes and Consequences (1 Lecture)




    1. Significance of the Bolshevik Revolution (1 Lecture)




    1. Rise of Fascism / Nazism (2 Lectures)

Unit-V


    1. World War II: Causes and Consequences (3 Lectures)




    1. Cold War: Different Phases (4 Lectures)




    1. Emergence of the Third World (3 Lectures)




    1. Collapse of the USSR and the End of the Cold War (2 Lectures)




    1. Post Cold War Developments and Emergence of Other Power Centers of Power (4 Lectures)


Essential Readings:
M. Nicholson, (2002) International Relations: A Concise Introduction, New York: Palgrave, pp. 1-4.


  1. Jackson and G. Sorensen, (2007) Introduction to International Relations: Theories and Approches, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 2-7




  1. Joshua. Goldstein and J. Pevehouse, (2007) International Relations, New York: Pearson Longman, 2007, pp. 29-35

C. Brown and K. Ainley, (2009) Understanding International Relations, Basingstoke: Palgrave, pp. 1-16.


Additional Readings:
K. Mingst and J. Snyder, (2011) Essential Readings in International Relations, New York: W.W. Nortan and Company, pp. 1-15.
M. Smith and R. Little, (eds) (2000) ‘Introduction’, in Perspectives on World Politics, New York: Routledge, 2000, 1991, pp. 1-17.
J. Baylis and S. Smith (eds), (2008) The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 1-6.
R. Mansbach and K. Taylor, (2008) Introduction to Global Politics, New York: Routledge, pp. 2-32.
Rumki Basu, (ed)(2012) International Politics: Concepts, Theories and Issues New Delhi, Sage.
History and IR: Emergence of the International State System:
Essential Readings:
R. Mansbach and K. Taylor, (2012) Introduction to Global Politics, New York: Routledge, pp. 33-68.
K. Mingst, (2011) Essentials of International Relations, New York: W.W. Nortan and Company, pp. 16-63.
P. Viotti and M. Kauppi, (2007) International Relations and World Politics: Security, Economy, Identity, Pearson Education, pp. 40-85.
Additional Readings:
J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens, (2008) The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 36-89.
R. Mansbach and K. Taylor, (2008) Introduction to Global Politics, New York: Routledge, pp. 70-135.
J Goldstein and J. Pevehouse, (2007) International Relations, New York: Pearson Longman, pp. 50-69.

E. Hobsbawm, (1995) Age of Extremes: The Short Twentieth Century 1914-1991, Vikings.


S. Lawson, (2003) International Relations, Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 21-60.

How do you Understand IR (Levels of Analysis):

Essential Readings:


J. Singer, (1961) ‘The International System: Theoretical Essays’, World Politics, Vol. 14(1), pp. 77-92.

B. Buzan, (1995) ‘The Level of Analysis Problem in International Relations Reconsidered,’ in K. Booth and S. Smith, (eds), International Relations Theory Today, Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press, pp. 198-216.

Additional Readings:
K. Mingst, (2011) Essentials of International Relations, New York: W.W. Nortan and Company, pp. 93-178.


  1. Goldstein and J. Pevehouse, (2007) International Relations, New York: Pearson Longman, pp. 35-49.

  2. Waltz, (1959) Man, The State and War, Columbia: Columbia University Press.

Theoretical Perspectives:




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