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I: Introducing Political Theory



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I: Introducing Political Theory

Unit-I

  1. What is Politics: Theorizing the ‘Political’




  1. Traditions of Political Theory: Liberal, Marxist, Anarchist and Conservative

Unit-II


  1. Approaches to Political Theory: Normative, Historical and Empirical

Unit-III


  1. Critical and Contemporary Perspectives in Political Theory: Feminist and Postmodern

Unit-IV

II: Political Theory and Practice

The Grammar of Democracy

  1. Democracy: The history of an idea




  1. Procedural Democracy and its critique

Unit-V

The Grammar of Democracy


  1. Deliberative Democracy




    1. Participation and Representation


Essential Readings
I: Introducing Political Theory
Bhargava, R. (2008) ‘What is Political Theory’, in Bhargava, R and Acharya, A. (eds.) Political Theory: An Introduction. New Delhi: Pearson Longman, pp. 2-16.
Bellamy, R. (1993) ‘Introduction: The Demise and Rise of Political Theory’, in Bellamy, R. (ed.) Theories and Concepts of Politics. New York: Manchester University Press, pp. 1-14.
Glaser, D. (1995) ‘Normative Theory’, in Marsh, D. and Stoker, G. (eds.) Theory and Methods in Political Science. London: Macmillan, pp. 21-40.

Sanders, D. (1995) ‘Behavioral Analysis’, in Marsh, D. and Stoker, G. (eds.) Theory and Methods in Political Science. London: Macmillan, pp. 58-75.


Chapman, J. (1995) ‘The Feminist Perspective’, in Marsh, D. and Stoker, G. (eds.) Theory and Methods in Political Science. London: Macmillan, pp. 94-114.
Bharghava, R, ‘Why Do We Need Political Theory’, in Bhargava, R. and Acharya, A. (eds.) Political Theory: An Introduction. New Delhi: Pearson Longman, pp. 17-36.
Bannett, J. (2004) ‘Postmodern Approach to Political Theory’, in Kukathas, Ch. and Gaus, G. F. (eds.) Handbook of Political Theory. New Delhi: Sage, pp. 46-54.
Vincent, A. (2004) The Nature of Political Theory. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, pp. 19-80.
II: The Grammar of Democracy
Srinivasan, J. (2008) ‘Democracy’, in Bhargava, R. and Acharya, A. (eds.) Political Theory: An Introduction. New Delhi: Pearson Longman, pp. 106-128.
Owen, D. (2003) ‘Democracy’, in Bellamy, R. and Mason, A. (eds.) Political Concepts. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, pp. 105-117.
Christiano, Th. (2008) ‘Democracy’, in Mckinnon, C. (ed.) Issues in Political Theory, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 80-96.
Arblaster, A. (1994) Democracy. (2nd Edition). Buckingham: Open University Press.
Roy, A. ‘Citizenship’, in Bhargava, R. and Acharya, A. (eds.) Political Theory: An Introduction. New Delhi: Pearson Longman, pp. 130-146.
Brighouse, H. (2008) ‘Citizenship’, in Mckinnon, C. (ed.) Issues in Political Theory, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 241-258.
1.2 Paper II- Constitutional Government and Democracy in India (100(80+20)
Course objective: This course acquaints students with the constitutional design of state structures and institutions, and their actual working over time. The Indian Constitution accommodates conflicting impulses (of liberty and justice, territorial decentralization and a strong union, for instance) within itself. The course traces the embodiment of some of these conflicts in constitutional provisions, and shows how these have played out in political practice. It further encourages a study of state institutions in their mutual interaction, and in interaction with the larger extra-constitutional environment.
Unit-I

I. The Constituent Assembly and the Constitution


  1. Philosophy of the Constitution, the Preamble, and Features of the Constitution

Unit-II


  1. Fundamental Rights and Directive Principles (2 weeks or 8 lectures)

Unit-III

II. Organs of Government, Union Government (20 lectures)

  1. The Legislature: Parliament (1.5 weeks or 6 lectures)




  1. The Executive: President and Prime Minister (2 weeks or 8 lectures)




  1. The Judiciary: Supreme Court and High Courts (1.5 weeks or 6 lectures)

Unit-IV

Organs of Government, State Government



  1. The State Legislature

  2. The Executive ; The Governor, Chief Minister

  3. The Judiciary : High Courts and Subordinate Courts

Unit-V

III. Federalism and Decentralization (12 lectures)


  1. Federalism: Division of Powers, Emergency Provisions, Fifth and Sixth Schedules (2 weeks or 8 lectures)

  2. Panchayati Raj and Municipalities (1 week or 4 lectures)


READING LIST
I. The Constituent Assembly and the Constitution

a. Philosophy of the Constitution, the Preamble, and Features of the Constitution

Essential Readings:


G. Austin, (2010) ‘The Constituent Assembly: Microcosm in Action’, in The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 15th print, pp.1-25.
R. Bhargava, (2008) ‘Introduction: Outline of a Political Theory of the Indian Constitution’, in R. Bhargava (ed.) Politics and Ethics of the Indian Constitution, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 1-40.
Additional Reading:

D. Basu, (2012) Introduction to the Constitution of India, New Delhi: Lexis Nexis.


S. Chaube, (2009) The Making and Working of the Indian Constitution, Delhi: National Book Trust.
b. Fundamental Rights and Directive Principles

Essential Readings:

G. Austin, (2000) ‘The Social Revolution and the First Amendment’, in Working a Democratic Constitution, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 69-98.

A. Sibal, (2010) ‘From Niti to Nyaya,’ Seminar, Issue 615, pp 28-34.


Additional Reading:

The Constitution of India: Bare Act with Short Notes, (2011) New Delhi: Universal, pp. 4-16.

II. Organs of Government

  1. The Legislature: Parliament

Essential Readings:


B. Shankar and V. Rodrigues, (2011) ‘The Changing Conception of Representation: Issues, Concerns and Institutions’, in The Indian Parliament: A Democracy at Work, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 105-173.
V. Hewitt and S. Rai, (2010) ‘Parliament’, in P. Mehta and N. Jayal (eds.) The Oxford Companion to Politics in India, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 28-42.

  1. The Executive: President and Prime Minister

Essential Readings:
J. Manor, (2005) ‘The Presidency’, in D. Kapur and P. Mehta P. (eds.) Public Institutions in India, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp.105-127.
J. Manor, (1994) ‘The Prime Minister and the President’, in B. Dua and J. Manor (eds.) Nehru to the Nineties: The Changing Office of the Prime Minister in India, Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, pp. 20-47.
H. Khare, (2003) ‘Prime Minister and the Parliament: Redefining Accountability in the Age of Coalition Government’, in A. Mehra and G. Kueck (eds.) The Indian Parliament: A Comparative Perspective, New Delhi: Konark, pp. 350-368.

c. The Judiciary: Supreme Court

Essential Readings:


U. Baxi, (2010) ‘The Judiciary as a Resource for Indian Democracy’, Seminar, Issue 615, pp. 61-67.
R. Ramachandran, (2006) ‘The Supreme Court and the Basic Structure Doctrine’ in B. Kirpal et.al (eds.) Supreme but not Infallible: Essays in Honour of the Supreme Court of India, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 107-133.

Additional Reading:

L. Rudolph and S. Rudolph, (2008) ‘Judicial Review Versus Parliamentary Sovereignty’, in Explaining Indian Institutions: A Fifty Year Perspective, 1956-2006: Volume 2: The Realm of Institutions: State Formation and Institutional Change. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 183-210.

III. Federalism and Decentralization



a. Federalism: Division of Powers, Emergency Provisions, Fifth and Sixth Schedules

Essential Readings:


M. Singh, and R. Saxena (eds.), (2011) ‘Towards Greater Federalization,’ in Indian Politics: Constitutional Foundations and Institutional Functioning, Delhi: PHI Learning Private Ltd., pp. 166-195.

V. Marwah, (1995) ‘Use and Abuse of Emergency Powers: The Indian Experience’, in B. Arora and D. Verney (eds.) Multiple Identities in a Single State: Indian Federalism in a Comparative Perspective, Delhi: Konark, pp. 136-159.

B. Sharma, (2010) ‘The 1990s: Great Expectations’; ‘The 2000s: Disillusionment Unfathomable’, in Unbroken History of Broken Promises: Indian State and Tribal People,

Delhi: Freedom Press and Sahyog Pustak Kuteer, pp. 64-91.



The Constitution of India: Bare Act with Short Notes, (2011) New Delhi: Universal, pp 192-213.
Additional Readings:
R. Dhavan and R. Saxena, (2006) ‘The Republic of India’, in K. Roy, C. Saunders and J. Kincaid (eds.) A Global Dialogue on Federalism, Volume 3, Montreal: Queen’s University Press, pp. 166-197.

R. Manchanda, (2009) The No Nonsense Guide to Minority Rights in South Asia, Delhi: Sage Publications, pp. 105-109.



b. Panchayati Raj and Municipalities

Essential Readings:


P. deSouza, (2002) ‘Decentralization and Local Government: The Second Wind of Democracy in India’, in Z. Hasan, E. Sridharan and R. Sudarshan (eds.) India’s Living Constitution: Ideas, Practices and Controversies, New Delhi: Permanent Black, pp. 370-404.

M. John, (2007) ‘Women in Power? Gender, Caste and Politics of Local Urban Governance’, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 42(39), pp. 3986-3993.

Raghunandan, J. R (2012) Decentralization and local governments: The Indian Experience, Orient Black Swan, New Delhi

Baviskar, B.S and George Mathew (eds) 2009 Inclusion and Exclusion in local governance: Field Studies from rural India, New Delhi, Sage



SEMESTER-II

2.1 Paper III – Political Theory-Concepts and Debates (100(80+20)

Course Objective: This course is divided into two sections. Section A helps the student familiarize with the basic normative concepts of political theory. Each concept is related to a crucial political issue that requires analysis with the aid of our conceptual understanding. This exercise is designed to encourage critical and reflective analysis and interpretation of social practices through the relevant conceptual toolkit. Section B introduces the students to the important debates in the subject. These debates prompt us to consider that there is no settled way of understanding concepts and that in the light of new insights and challenges, besides newer ways of perceiving and interpreting the world around us, we inaugurate new modes of political debates.

Section A: Core Concepts



Unit-I

I. Importance of Freedom (10 Lectures)


  1. Negative Freedom: Liberty




  1. Positive Freedom: Freedom as Emancipation and Development


Important Issue: Freedom of belief, expression and dissent
Unit-II
II. Significance of Equality (12 lectures)


  1. Formal Equality: Equality of opportunity




  1. Political equality




  1. Egalitarianism: Background inequalities and differential treatment


Important Issue: Affirmative action
Unit-III
III. Indispensability of Justice (12 Lectures)

  1. Procedural Justice




  1. Distributive Justice




  1. Global Justice


Important Issue: Capital punishment
Unit-IV
IV. The Universality of Rights (13 Lectures)

  1. Natural Rights




  1. Moral and Legal Rights




  1. Three Generations of Rights




  1. Rights and Obligations


Important Issue: Rights of the girl child

Unit-V
Section B: Major Debates (13 Lectures)
I. Why should we obey the state? Issues of political obligation and civil disobedience.
II. Are human rights universal? Issue of cultural relativism.
III. How do we accommodate diversity in plural society? Issues of multiculturalism and toleration.

Essential Readings
Section A: Core Concepts
I. Importance of Freedom
Riley, Jonathan. (2008) ‘Liberty’ in Mckinnon, Catriona (ed.) Issues in Political Theory, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 103-119.
Knowles, Dudley. (2001) Political Philosophy. London: Routledge, pp. 69- 132.
Swift, Adam. (2001) Political Philosophy: A Beginners Guide for Student’s and Politicians.
Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 51-88.
Carter, Ian. (2003) ‘Liberty’, in Bellamy, Richard and Mason, Andrew (eds.). Political Concepts. Manchester: Manchester University Press, pp. 4-15.
Sethi, Aarti. (2008) ‘Freedom of Speech and the Question of Censorship’, in Bhargava, Rajeev and Acharya, Ashok. (eds.) Political Theory: An Introduction. New Delhi: Pearson Longman, pp. 308-319.

II. Significance of Equality

Swift, Adam. (2001) Political Philosophy: A Beginners Guide for Student’s and Politicians.


Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 91-132.
Casal, Paula & William, Andrew. (2008) ‘Equality’, in McKinnon, Catriona. (ed.) Issues in Political Theory. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 149- 165.
Acharya, Ashok. (2008) ‘Affirmative Action’, in Bhargava, Rajeev and Acharya, Ashok. (eds.) Political Theory: An Introduction. New Delhi: Pearson Longman, pp. 298-307.
III. Indispensability of Justice
Menon, Krishna. (2008) ‘Justice’, in Bhargava, Rajeev and Acharya, Ashok. (eds.) Political Theory: An Introduction. New Delhi: Pearson Longman, pp. 74-86.
Wolf, Jonathan. (2008) ‘Social Justice’, in McKinnon, Catriona. (ed.) Issues in Political Theory. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 172-187.
Swift, Adam. (2001) Political Philosophy: A Beginners Guide for Student’s and Politicians.
Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 9-48.
Knowles, Dudley. (2001) Political Philosophy. London: Routledge, pp. 177-238.
McKinnon, Catriona. (ed.) (2008) Issues in Political Theory. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 289-305.
Bedau, Hugo Adam. (2003) ‘Capital Punishment’, in LaFollette, Hugh (ed.). The Oxford Handbook of Practical Ethics. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 705-733.
IV. The Universality of Rights
Seglow, Jonathan. (2003) ‘Multiculturalism’ in Bellamy, Richard and Mason, Andrew (eds.). Political Concepts. Manchester: Manchester University Press, pp. 156-168.
Tulkdar, P.S. (2008) ‘Rights’ in Bhargava, Rajeev and Acharya, Ashok. (eds.) Political Theory: An Introduction. New Delhi: Pearson Longman, pp. 88-104.
McKinnon, Catriona. (2003) ‘Rights’, in Bellamy, Richard and Mason, Andrew. (eds.) Political Concepts. Manchester: Manchester University Press, pp. 16-27.
Menlowe, M.A. (1993) ‘Political Obligations’, in Bellamy Richard.(ed.) Theories and Concepts of Politics. New York: Manchester University Press, pp. 174-194.
Amoah, Jewel. (2007) ‘The World on Her Shoulders: The Rights of the Girl-Child in the Context of Culture & Identity’, in Essex Human Rights Review, 4(2), pp. 1-23.

Working Group on the Girl Child (2007), A Girl’s Right to Live: Female Foeticide and Girl Infanticide, available on http://www.crin.org/docs/Girl’s infanticide CSW 2007.txt

Section B: Major Debates
Hyums, Keith. (2008) ‘Political Authority and Obligation’, in Mckinnon, Catriona. (ed.) Issues in Political Theory, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 9-26
Martin, Rex. (2003) ‘Political Obligation’, in Bellamy, Richard and Mason, Andrew. (eds.) Political Concepts, Manchester: Manchester University Press, pp. 41-51.
Campbell, Tom. (2008) ‘Human Rights’ in Mckinnon, Catriona. (ed.) Issues in Political Theory. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 194-210.
Mookherjee, Monica, ‘Multiculturalism’, in Mckinnon, Catriona. (ed.) Issues in Political Theory. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 218- 234.
Seglow, Jonathan, ‘Multiculturalism’, in Bellamy, Richard and Mason, Andrew. (eds.) Political Concepts, Manchester: Manchester University Press, pp. 156-168.


2.2 Paper IV- Political Process in India (100(80+20)

Course objective: Actual politics in India diverges quite significantly from constitutional legal rules. An understanding of the political process thus calls for a different mode of analysis - that offered by political sociology. This course maps the working of ‘modern’ institutions, premised on the existence of an individuated society, in a context marked by communitarian solidarities, and their mutual transformation thereby. It also familiarizes students with the working of the Indian state, paying attention to the contradictory dynamics of modern state power.

Unit-I

I. Political Parties and the Party System

Trends in the Party System; From the Congress System to Multi-Party Coalitions



Unit-II

II. Determinants of Voting Behaviour

Caste, Class, Gender and Religion



Unit-III

III. Regional Aspirations

The Politics of Secession and Accommodation



Unit-IV

IV. Religion and Politics

Debates on Secularism; Minority and Majority Communalism



V. Caste and Politics

Caste in Politics and the Politicization of Caste



Unit-V

VI. Affirmative Action Policies (1.5 weeks or 6 lectures)

Women, Caste and Class



VII. The Changing Nature of the Indian State (1.5 weeks or 6 lectures)

Developmental, Welfare and Coercive Dimensions


READING LIST
I. Political Parties and the Party System: Trends in the Party System; From the Congress System to Multi-Party Coalitions

Essential Readings:


R. Kothari, (2002) ‘The Congress System’, in Z. Hasan (ed.) Parties and Party Politics in India, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp 39-55.
E. Sridharan, (2012) ‘Introduction: Theorizing Democratic Consolidation, Parties and Coalitions’, in Coalition Politics and Democratic Consolidation in Asia, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Additional Reading:
Y. Yadav and S. Palshikar, (2006) ‘Party System and Electoral Politics in the Indian States, 1952-2002: From Hegemony to Convergence’, in P. deSouza and E. Sridharan (eds.) India’s Political Parties, New Delhi: Sage Publications, pp. 73-115.

II. Determinants of Voting Behaviour: Caste, Class, Gender and Religion

Essential Readings:
Y. Yadav, (2000) ‘Understanding the Second Democratic Upsurge’, in F. Frankel, Z. Hasan, and R. Bhargava (eds.) Transforming India: Social and Political Dynamics in Democracy, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 120-145.
C. Jaffrelot, (2008) ‘Why Should We Vote? The Indian Middle Class and the Functioning of World’s Largest Democracy’, in Religion, Caste and Politics in India, Delhi: Primus, pp. 604-619.


  1. Deshpande, (2004) ‘How Gendered was Women’s Participation in Elections 2004?’,


Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 39, No. 51, pp. 5431-5436.


  1. Kumar, (2009) ‘Religious Practices Among Indian Hindus,’ Japanese Journal of Political Science, Vol. 10, No. 3, pp. 313-332.


III. Regional Aspirations: The Politics of Secession and Accommodation

Essential Readings:


M. Chadda, (2010) ‘Integration through Internal Reorganisation’, in S. Baruah (ed.) Ethnonationalism in India: A Reader, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 379-402.
P. Brass, (1999) ‘Crisis of National Unity: Punjab, the Northeast and Kashmir’, in The Politics of India Since Independence, New Delhi: Cambridge University Press and Foundation Books, pp.192-227.
IV. Religion and Politics: Debates on Secularism: Minority and Majority Communalism

Essential Readings:


T. Pantham, (2004) ‘Understanding Indian Secularism: Learning from its Recent Critics’, in R. Vora and S. Palshikar (eds.) Indian Democracy: Meanings and Practices, New Delhi: Sage, pp. 235-256.
N. Menon and A. Nigam, (2007) ‘Politics of Hindutva and the Minorities’, in Power and Contestation: India since 1989, London: Fernwood Publishing, Halifax and Zed Books, pp.36-60.
Additional Reading:
N. Chandhoke, (2010) ‘Secularism’, in P. Mehta and N. Jayal (eds.) The Oxford Companion to Politics in India, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 333-346.
V. Caste and Politics: Caste in Politics and the Politicization of Caste

Essential Readings:


R. Kothari, (1970) ‘Introduction’, in Caste in Indian Politics, Delhi: Orient Longman, pp.3-25. M. Weiner, (2001) ‘The Struggle for Equality: Caste in Indian Politics’, in Atul Kohli (ed.) The Success of India’s Democracy, New Delhi: Cambridge University Press, pp. 193-225.
G. Omvedt, (2002) ‘Ambedkar and After: The Dalit Movement in India’, in G. Shah (ed.) Social Movements and the State, New Delhi: Sage Publications, pp. 293-309.


VI. Affirmative Action Policies: Women, Caste and Class

Essential Readings:


M. Galanter, (2002) ‘The Long Half-Life of Reservations’, in Z. Hasan, E. Sridharan and R. Sudarshan (eds.) India’s Living Constitution: Ideas, Practices, Controversies, New Delhi: Permanent Black, pp. 306-318.
C. Jaffrelot, (2005) ‘The Politics of the OBCs’, in Seminar, Issue 549, pp. 41-45.
M. John, (2011) ‘The Politics of Quotas and the Women’s Reservation Bill in India’, in M. Tsujimura and J. Steele (eds.) Gender Equality in Asia, Japan: Tohoku University Press, pp. 169-195.


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