Chapter 01: Looking at Movies multiple choice



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Chapter 01: Looking at Movies
MULTIPLE CHOICE
1. In what ways that extend far beyond the multiplex have movies permeated our lives?

a.

We watch movies on cable and satellite channels, online, on our iPads and cell phones, buy them at video stores, through the mail, and so on.

b.

Half of Americans’ entertainment budgets go toward purchasing movies.

c.

Movies have proven their enduring cultural legacy by being the only sector of the entertainment industry unharmed by the digital revolution.

d.

According to research data, movies influence Americans’ opinions about culture and politics more than any other form of entertainment.

e.

Movies are the United States’ number-one export.

ANS: A DIF: Difficult REF: Page 2 TOP: Looking at Movies

MSC: Remembering
2. For how long were motion pictures popular before they were considered worthy of serious study?

a.

A year or two.

b.

10 years.

c.

20 years.

d.

50 years.

e.

The serious study of motion pictures made them popular—they weren’t so before.

ANS: D DIF: Easy REF: Page 2 TOP: Looking at Movies

MSC: Remembering
3. Why are movies worthy of serious study, as opposed to being merely an outlet for escape or entertainment?

a.

Seriously studying movies allows people to better make movies on their own.

b.

Seriously studying movies allows people to break the habit of constantly watching them.

c.

Seriously studying movies allows people to understand how movies shape the way we view the world.

d.

Seriously studying movies allows people to gather the plot synopses of movies they now no longer have to pay to watch.

e.

Seriously studying movies allows people to also understand literature, art, and other cultural areas.

ANS: C DIF: Medium REF: Page 2 TOP: Looking at Movies

MSC: Understanding
4. Because most movies seek to engage viewers’ emotions and transport them inside the world presented onscreen, the visual vocabulary of film is designed to:

a.

play upon those same instincts that we use to navigate and interpret the visual and aural information of our “real life.”

b.

work against those same instincts that we use to navigate and interpret the visual and aural information of our “real life.”

c.

refer to something else far outside our usual understanding of “real life.”

d.

alienate or distance viewers from what they are watching.

e.

cause disorientation and confusion in viewers.

ANS: A DIF: Medium REF: Pages 2–3 TOP: Looking at Movies

MSC: Remembering
5. As opposed to “film” or “cinema,” the term “movies” is applied to:

a.

motion pictures considered by critics and scholars to be serious and challenging.

b.

groups of films considered to be works of art.

c.

the physical spaces where people congregate to watch motion pictures.

d.

motion pictures made during the silent era of filmmaking.

e.

motion pictures that entertain the masses at the multiplex.

ANS: E DIF: Easy REF: Page 3 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Remembering
6. Which of the following is NOT typical of a finished movie product?

a.

It is about two hours long.

b.

It is highly experimental and “difficult” for most viewers.

c.

It screens initially in theaters.

d.

It is eventually released to DVD.

e.

It is created by a team of skilled artists and technicians.

ANS: B DIF: Easy REF: Page 4 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Remembering
7. Almost all ubiquitous commercial, feature-length movies share the same basic and important element of:

a.

genre.

d.

sound.

b.

narrative.

e.

format.

c.

myth.

ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: Page 3 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Remembering
8. The manner in which movies from various countries and societies present their narratives is often profoundly affected by:

a.

funding sources.

d.

propaganda purposes.

b.

media coverage.

e.

Hollywood mimicry.

c.

cultural tradition.

ANS: C DIF: Difficult REF: Page 4 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Remembering
9. Which of the following is NOT a method by which movies can diverge from the model of most North American and western European films?

a.

By lacking dramatic resolution.

b.

By directly addressing the audience.

c.

By presenting characters as social types or props in a political allegory.

d.

By arranging subject matter in a cause-and-effect sequence of events.

e.

By filming with handheld video cameras, a small crew, and a cast of nonactors.

ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: Page 4 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Remembering
10. Which of the following is NOT a characteristic of noncommercial alternative films on the fringes of popular culture?

a.

They are funded by major Hollywood studios.

b.

They continue to flourish.

c.

They innovate styles and aesthetics.

d.

They can be of any length.

e.

They exploit an array of exhibition options.

ANS: A DIF: Medium REF: Page 4 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Remembering
11. The essential quality that separates movies from all other two-dimensional pictorial art forms is:

a.

storytelling.

d.

the arrangement of visual elements.

b.

movement.

e.

the interaction of light and shadow.

c.

mechanical technology.

ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: Page 4 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Remembering
12. Unlike photography and painting, films are constructed from individual:

a.

laborers.

d.

shots.

b.

performances.

e.

lighting setups.

c.

stories.

ANS: D DIF: Easy REF: Page 4 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Remembering
13. A shot is best defined as:

a.

an unbroken span of action captured by an uninterrupted run of a motion-picture camera.

b.

an unbroken span of action captured by an interrupted run of a motion-picture camera.

c.

a storytelling unit in which action takes place in a single time and location.

d.

a collection of scenes united by related thematic or structural material.

e.

a lighting setup, prop, gesture, and the like, repeated throughout a movie.

ANS: A DIF: Difficult REF: Page 4 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Remembering
14. The joining together of discrete shots is called:

a.

mise-en-scène.

d.

mixing.

b.

lighting.

e.

juxtaposition.

c.

editing.

ANS: C DIF: Medium REF: Page 5 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Remembering
15. One of the unique properties of movies that distinguishes it from any other visual medium is its capacity to:

a.

view action from the same angle and relative size.

b.

prevent the viewer from witnessing events from multiple vantage points.

c.

confine the viewer to a single wide-angle view of the action.

d.

see every character at once and continuously.

e.

isolate details and juxtapose images within and between shots.

ANS: E DIF: Medium REF: Page 5 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Remembering
16. As opposed to the theater, how is cinema capable of conveying an object’s physical properties as well as its narrative significance and emotional meaning?

a.

It is impossible.

b.

Only by employing contrived gimmicks that call attention to themselves.

c.

Only by employing awkward shots that take the viewer out of the story.

d.

Via many practical options.

e.

Via limited practical options.

ANS: D DIF: Medium REF: Page 5 TOP: What Is a Movie?

MSC: Applying
17. Analysis is defined as:

a.

the act of comparing and contrasting.

b.

the act of taking something apart to figure out what it is made of and how it fits together.

c.

the act of creating something from scratch.

d.

the act of converting one form of information into another.

e.

the act of learning how to create art.

ANS: B DIF: Easy REF: Page 6 TOP: Ways of Looking at Movies

MSC: Remembering
18. Beyond breaking down a movie to identify the tools and techniques that comprise it, film analysis is also primarily concerned with:

a.

the movie’s box office gross.

b.

the function and potential effect of its combined tools and techniques.

c.

how the movie can be neatly categorized in terms of genre or style.

d.

how marketable or profitable the movie might have been had it used different tools and techniques.

e.

how the movie compares to a given work of literature or painting.

ANS: B DIF: Medium REF: Page 6 TOP: Ways of Looking at Movies

MSC: Remembering
19. The “invisibility” of meaning in movies is largely due to:

a.

their rapidly and constantly changing images not giving the viewer time to contemplate them.

b.

their lack of substantive content.

c.

their difficulty and challenging styles and messages.

d.

their conflation of real-life action with fictionalized action.

e.

their inability to move the viewer emotionally or intellectually.

ANS: A DIF: Easy REF: Page 6

TOP: Invisibility and Cinematic Language MSC: Remembering
20. What does a fade-out/fade-in usually convey when used in a narrative film?

a.

The film’s beginning.

d.

A flashback.

b.

The film’s end.

e.

A passage of time in between scenes.

c.

A dream sequence.

ANS: E DIF: Difficult REF: Pages 6–8

TOP: Invisibility and Cinematic Language MSC: Applying
21. Techniques such as fade-outs/fade-ins and low-angle shots communicate meaning by:

a.

contriving a film grammar bearing no similarities to how people perceive reality.

b.

only working in concordance with preceding and succeeding shots.

c.

solely addressing themselves to seasoned film experts and scholars.

d.

drawing upon the way we automatically interpret visual information in our real lives.

e.

constantly confusing and disorienting the viewing audience.

ANS: D DIF: Medium REF: Pages 6–8

TOP: Invisibility and Cinematic Language MSC: Remembering
22. What does a low-angle shot usually convey when used in a narrative film?

a.

The weakness or subjugated position of a character.

b.

The dominance or empowered position of a character.

c.

The neutrality of a character.

d.

The centrality of a character within the story.

e.

The natural beauty of a character.

ANS: B DIF: Easy REF: Page 8

TOP: Invisibility and Cinematic Language MSC: Applying
23. In order to exploit cinema’s capacity for transporting audiences into the world of the story, the commercial filmmaking process stresses:

a.

a rough, disruptive style.

b.

foregrounding and calling attention to transitions between shots and scenes.

c.

the maximization of any distractions that might remind viewers they are watching a movie.

d.

elements having nothing to do with the major concerns of the narrative.

e.

a polished continuity of lighting, performance, costume, makeup, and movement.

ANS: E DIF: Medium REF: Page 8

TOP: Invisibility and Cinematic Language MSC: Remembering
24. One of the most common editing techniques designed to hide the instantaneous and potentially jarring shift from one camera viewpoint to another is:

a.

montage.

d.

the fade-out/fade-in.

b.

cutting on action.

e.

the low-angle shot.

c.

direct address.

ANS: B DIF: Medium REF: Page 8

TOP: Invisibility and Cinematic Language MSC: Remembering
25. How have motion pictures been recently liberated from the imposed impermanence that helped foster cinematic invisibility?

a.

By decreasing in cultural importance.

b.

By directly addressing political issues.

c.

By being available on and through DVD, DVR, and streaming video.

d.

By increasingly being produced with digital technology.

e.

By being meticulously archived and catalogued.

ANS: C DIF: Difficult REF: Page 9

TOP: Invisibility and Cinematic Language MSC: Applying
26. In order to entertain and not provoke its customers, the film industry usually favors stories and themes that:

a.

upset and question their most fundamental desires and beliefs.

b.

bear a superficial relation to their most fundamental desires and beliefs.

c.

actively avoid addressing their most fundamental desires and beliefs.

d.

tap into and reinforce their most fundamental desires and beliefs.

e.

compare their most fundamental desires and beliefs to those of others.

ANS: D DIF: Easy REF: Page 10 TOP: Cultural Invisibility

MSC: Remembering
27. In regard to viewers’ shared belief systems, how can movies deemed “controversial” or “provocative” be popular with audiences?

a.

By tricking them with a misleading advertising campaign.

b.

By triggering emotional responses from viewers that reinforce yearnings that lie deep within.

c.

By arousing viewers’ curiosity to see something shocking.

d.

By addressing taboos only to ultimately defend a traditional or conservative point of view.

e.

By starring famous actors and actresses—controversial movies without such star power inevitably fail.

ANS: B DIF: Medium REF: Page 10 TOP: Cultural Invisibility

MSC: Applying
28. Why is cultural invisibility not always a calculated decision on the part of filmmakers?

a.

Because they don’t know any better.

b.

Because they aren’t skilled enough in crafting movies.

c.

Because they misjudge the reactions of their audience.

d.

Because they often have to make movies according to monetary rather than aesthetic concerns.

e.

Because they are products of the same society inhabited by their intended audience.

ANS: E DIF: Easy REF: Page 10 TOP: Cultural Invisibility

MSC: Understanding
29. Juno adheres to cultural invisibility by:

a.

championing a protagonist who rejects convention yet ultimately upholds the traditional institutions she seemingly scorns.

b.

chastising a protagonist who rejects convention yet ultimately upholds the traditional institutions she seemingly scorns.

c.

championing a protagonist who accepts convention yet ultimately rejects the traditional institutions she seemingly scorns.

d.

chastising a protagonist who accepts convention yet ultimately rejects the traditional institutions she seemingly scorns.

e.

failing to resolve its protagonist’s attitude toward convention and traditional institutions.

ANS: A DIF: Difficult REF: Page 11 TOP: Cultural Invisibility

MSC: Applying
30. Even as Juno seems to call into question some of contemporary America’s attitudes about family, it also:

a.

refuses to take itself seriously by employing low-brow humor.

b.

calls into question some of contemporary America’s attitudes about politics.

c.

appeals to an arguably more fundamental American value of robust individualism.

d.

represents a wide diversity of kinds of family.

e.

suggests the individual should have less significance within the family.

ANS: C DIF: Difficult REF: Page 11 TOP: Cultural Invisibility

MSC: Applying
31. Implicit meaning is best defined as ________, while explicit meaning is best defined as ________.

a.

meaning available on the surface of the movie; a deep-level association, connection, or inference

b.

a deep-level association, connection, or inference; meaning available on the surface of the movie

c.

meaning unavailable on the surface of the movie; a deep-level association, connection, or inference

d.

meaning available on the surface of the movie; a superficial-level association, connection, or inference

e.

meaning unconnected to the movie; meaning connected to the movie

ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: Page 11

TOP: Implicit and Explicit Meaning MSC: Remembering
32. One way of thinking about implicit meaning is understanding it as a movie’s:

a.

overall message or “point.”

d.

impact on audiences.

b.

central character.

e.

financial success or failure.

c.

genre.

ANS: A DIF: Easy REF: Page 12

TOP: Implicit and Explicit Meaning MSC: Applying
33. In order to possess validity, interpretation of a movie needs to be:

a.

agreed upon by everybody.

b.

completely original.

c.

a fantastical reordering of basic story information.

d.

grounded in the explicitly presented details of the surface story.

e.

completely unrelated to the surface story.

ANS: D DIF: Easy REF: Page 12

TOP: Implicit and Explicit Meaning MSC: Remembering
34. Just as explicit and implicit meanings need not pertain to the movie as a whole, not all implicit meaning is:

a.

relevant.

b.

valid.

c.

interesting.

d.

tied to broad messages or themes.

e.

tied to small-scale messages or themes.

ANS: D DIF: Easy REF: Page 12

TOP: Implicit and Explicit Meaning MSC: Remembering
35. In the scene from Juno where the main character applies lipstick before visiting Mark, the implications of this action are:

a.

explicit.

b.

implicit.

c.

unimportant to the overall narrative.

d.

intended to be the most significant detail in the film.

e.

accidental.

ANS: B DIF: Medium REF: Page 12

TOP: Implicit and Explicit Meaning MSC: Applying
36. Because movies are rich in plot detail, a good analysis must begin by:

a.

disregarding such detail.

b.

sorting through the details and extracting the most important among them.

c.

immediately mining for implicit meaning.

d.

comparing the details to those of other movies.

e.

taking into account the breadth and diversity of what has been explicitly presented.

ANS: E DIF: Difficult REF: Pages 12–13

TOP: Implicit and Explicit Meaning MSC: Applying
37. Which of the following does NOT provide an example of how movies relate to viewer expectations?

a.

A movie unsuccessfully exploits a standard structure.

b.

A movie masterfully surprises or misleads its audience.

c.

A movie goes over budget and thus fails to make a profit at the box office.

d.

A movie deliberately confounds its audience’s presumption of continuity and narrative.

e.

A movie adheres to a winning formula in which a protagonist pursues a goal by confronting obstacles.

ANS: C DIF: Medium REF: Page 13 TOP: Viewer Expectations

MSC: Applying
38. Expectations specific to a particular performer or filmmaker can inform an analysis of:

a.

the elements common to the performer or filmmaker’s seemingly schizophrenic body of work.

b.

how the performer or filmmaker’s artistic choices are random and never thematically linked.

c.

the personal motives governing the performer or filmmaker’s investment in particular projects.

d.

the reasons audiences respond to one performer or filmmaker rather than another.

e.

what a particular performer or filmmaker intends for each shot of a movie.

ANS: A DIF: Difficult REF: Pages 13–14 TOP: Viewer Expectations

MSC: Applying
39. Which of the following would NOT be an appropriate element to comparatively analyze across a director’s body of work?

a.

Production design.

d.

Recurring themes.

b.

Lighting.

e.

Critical reception.

c.

Special effects.

ANS: E DIF: Medium REF: Page 14 TOP: Viewer Expectations

MSC: Applying
40. Formal analysis is the analytical approach primarily concerned with:

a.

the socioeconomic factors influencing the content of a movie.

b.

the means by which a subject is expressed.

c.

the industry dynamics that determine the circumstances of a movie’s production.

d.

the overall trajectory of a filmmaker’s body of work.

e.

the history and evolution of a specific film style, genre, or movement.

ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: Page 14 TOP: Formal Analysis

MSC: Remembering
41. Which of the following is NOT a movie meaning expressed through form?

a.

Mood.

d.

Significance.

b.

Tone.

e.

What a character is thinking or feeling.

c.

Budgetary cost.

ANS: C DIF: Easy REF: Page 14 TOP: Formal Analysis

MSC: Applying
42. Before attempting any interpretation of the formal elements used to communicate intended meaning to the spectator, the analyst should carefully consider:

a.

the popularity of the movie.

b.

the marketing campaign of the movie.

c.

the critical reception of the movie.

d.

the narrative intent of the moment, scene, or sequence in the movie.

e.

the previous work of the filmmaker(s) who made the movie.

ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: Page 14 TOP: Formal Analysis

MSC: Applying
43. The simple awareness that Juno’s opening shot is the first image of the movie informs the analyst of the moment’s:

a.

evocation of setting and time.

b.

relative unimportance to the rest of the narrative events.

c.

function as the credit sequence.

d.

placement at the chronological beginning of the story.

e.

resonance in context of the director’s other work.

ANS: A DIF: Difficult REF: Pages 14–15 TOP: Formal Analysis

MSC: Applying
44. A formal analysis of the first two shots of Juno reveals:

a.

the way too much meaning can be read into movies.

b.

the manner in which director Jason Reitman lit and shot the movie’s opening scene.

c.

the single, simple function and meaning they are meant to impart.

d.

the multiple functions and meanings they are meant to impart.

e.

the refusal of audience involvement as intended by the filmmakers.

ANS: D DIF: Easy REF: Pages 14–15 TOP: Formal Analysis

MSC: Applying
45. The waiting room scene in Juno depends significantly on ________ to function effectively.

a.

shock value

b.

the dispensation of all mainstream film conventions

c.

complicated and disorienting point-of-view shots

d.

an antipathy toward abortion

e.

editing patterns

ANS: E DIF: Medium REF: Pages 16–19 TOP: Formal Analysis

MSC: Applying
46. Alternative approaches to film analysis (approaches other than formal analysis) look at movies more as ________ than as traditional works of art.

a.

mysterious phenomena

d.

meaningless entertainment

b.

political propaganda

e.

stylistic experiments

c.

cultural artifacts

ANS: C DIF: Medium REF: Page 19

TOP: Alternative Approaches to Analysis MSC: Remembering
47. Alternative approaches to film analysis search beneath a movie’s form and content in order to expose:

a.

the movie as ultimately without value.

b.

the filmmakers as ideologically corrupt.

c.

moviegoers as manipulated dupes of the movie’s political agenda.

d.

implicit and hidden meanings that inform our understanding of cinema’s function within popular culture.

e.

the entire entertainment industry as unsuspectingly subject to outside influences.

ANS: D DIF: Medium REF: Page 19

TOP: Alternative Approaches to Analysis MSC: Remembering
48. Which of the following would NOT be considered an alternative analysis of Juno?

a.

An exploration of the movie’s treatment of class.

b.

A detailed explication of the movie’s repeated use of close-ups during its most dramatic moments.

c.

A feminist perspective on the movie’s depiction of women and childbirth.

d.

A look at the creative and ideological contributions of the movie’s female screenwriter.

e.

A linguistic analysis of the historical, cultural, or imaginary origins of the movie’s highly stylized slang.

ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: Pages 19–21

TOP: Alternative Approaches to Analysis MSC: Applying
49. Which of the following would NOT be considered a comparative analysis of Juno?

a.

An analysis of the movie as well as others made by the same director.

b.

An analysis of the movie as well as others throughout film history that also deal with pregnancy.

c.

An analysis of the movie’s successful adherence to a three-act screenplay structure.

d.

An analysis of the movie in the context of several contemporary movies about young women about to become mothers.

e.

An analysis of the movie in the context of contemporary American comedies tackling controversial topics.

ANS: C DIF: Difficult REF: Page 21

TOP: Alternative Approaches to Analysis MSC: Applying
50. An analysis of the decidedly different characters, settings, and stories among an array of contemporary dramatic comedies dealing with pregnancy might reveal:

a.

the reason certain genres can never successfully depict a certain subject.

b.

current ideas about women and motherhood.

c.

the answer to a troubling social problem.

d.

the most efficacious way to make such a film within the Hollywood system.

e.

which film audiences will respond to most.

ANS: B DIF: Medium REF: Page 21

TOP: Alternative Approaches to Analysis MSC: Applying
51. Which of the following would NOT be illuminated by a comparative analysis of a movie?

a.

How certain movies represent a particular era’s cultural attitudes.

b.

How the relative gender of different films’ creators affects their representation of cultural attitudes.

c.

The differences between American and European cinematic sensibilities.

d.

The differences between genres using the same topical premise.

e.

The repeated use of a color palette in a specific movie.

ANS: E DIF: Medium REF: Pages 21–22

TOP: Alternative Approaches to Analysis MSC: Applying
52. Why would an analysis of the way Juno uses editing techniques similar to those among other contemporary movies be considered a valid one?

a.

Because it automatically implies that Juno is a derivative work of art.

b.

Because it approaches the movie in strictly formal terms.

c.

Because it combines formal and comparative analyses.

d.

Because it separates the film’s editing from all other aspects of its aesthetic.

e.

Because it divorces the film from its cultural context.

ANS: C DIF: Medium REF: Pages 21–22

TOP: Alternative Approaches to Analysis MSC: Applying
53. Film scholars pay special attention to blockbusters and other popular entertainments in order to:

a.

garner a larger readership.

b.

compare the quality of such movies with that of art films.

c.

understand which elements connect such movies with legions of viewers.

d.

roundly criticize all movies that play to massive audiences.

e.

figure out the closely guarded secrets of such movies’ special effects.

ANS: C DIF: Easy REF: Page Insert 22

TOP: Cultural and Formal Analysis in The Hunger Games MSC: Remembering
54. Which of the following traits could NOT have contributed to the success of the Hunger Games films?

a.

A protagonist who is anti-authoritarian.

b.

A strong female protagonist.

c.

Underdog protagonists whose hidden talents lead them to victory.

d.

Sympathetic antagonists who display the full range of human emotion.

e.

A story that presents a validating vision of teen empowerment.

ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: Page Insert 23

TOP: Cultural and Formal Analysis in The Hunger Games MSC: Applying
55. An analyst studying the appeal of the Hunger Games movies could examine all of the following EXCEPT:

a.

the series from a feminist viewpoint.

b.

Katniss’s place in a classical storytelling tradition.

c.

the other films directed by the filmmakers who worked on the series.

d.

Katniss’s resonance as a Christ figure.

e.

the films’ central themes and how those ideas reflect the culture that produced and consumed the series.

ANS: C DIF: Easy REF: Page Insert 23

TOP: Cultural and Formal Analysis in The Hunger Games MSC: Applying
56. Which of the following characters does NOT follow the Christ archetype?

a.

Katniss from the Hunger Games series.

b.

Luke Sywalker from Star Wars.

c.

Neo from The Matrix.

d.

Juno from Juno.

e.

Harry Potter from the Harry Potter series.

ANS: D DIF: Easy REF: Page Insert 23

TOP: Cultural and Formal Analysis in The Hunger Games MSC: Remembering
57. For a series of movies like The Hunger Games, violence:

a.

contributes a sophisticated visual spectacle to match its sophisticated story and characters.

b.

contributes a sophisticated visual spectacle to distract viewers from its simplistic story and characters.

c.

contributes a sophisticated visual spectacle unwanted by movie viewers.

d.

contributes little in the way of a sophisticated visual spectacle due to the technological crudity of the digital revolution.

e.

contributes story and character elements missing from the original script.

ANS: A DIF: Medium REF: Page 23

TOP: Cultural and Formal Analysis in The Hunger Games MSC: Applying
58. Depth of field can be used to:

a.

create seamless transitions between shots.

b.

adjust the color of a shot.

c.

control what part of the frame is in focus.

d.

call attention to the artifice of editing.

e.

control what part of the shot is in the frame.

ANS: C DIF: Medium REF: Page 27

TOP: Cultural and Formal Analysis in The Hunger Games MSC: Remembering
59. Which of the following is NOT a technique used to increase the significance of a subject?

a.

Dollying in on the subject.

b.

Using more elaborate camera movement.

c.

Compressing the depth of field so that only the subject is in focus.

d.

Using tighter framing.

e.

Raising the volume of the subject’s audio.

ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: Pages 27–29

TOP: Cultural and Formal Analysis in The Hunger Games MSC: Applying
60. Which of the following visual references is NOT used in the Hunger Games series?

a.

The crucifixion of Jesus.

b.

Photographs from Depression-era America.

c.

Sergei Eisenstein’s Battleship Potemkin.

d.

Pablo Picasso’s Blue Period.

e.

Early twentieth-century fascist architecture.

ANS: D DIF: Medium REF: Page Insert 25

TOP: Cultural and Formal Analysis in The Hunger Games MSC: Remembering



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