Cahsee homework



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Rasheed was very excited when he walked by the department store. The winter coat that he had wanted to buy was on sale for just forty-nine dollars. Rasheed had just gotten a paycheck for eighty dollars from his job at the antiques store. Now all he needed to was cash his check and come back to buy the coat. The bank was just five blocks away. “I’ll be right back,” he thought as he walked past the department store.


  1. Where was Rasheed going? Underline the supporting details above and write your answer below.

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Tricia was proud of how well she was playing today. She knew that she was competing with many other young women, and she concentrated hard every time she got the basketball. She ran as hard as she could to chase down every loose ball, and she made every three-pointer she attempted. She saw the coach watching her closely. “I hope I get picked,” Tricia thought to herself.


  1. What activity do you think Tricia was doing? Underline the details that support your inference and write your answer.

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Lisette was excited about starting high school. Her mom had bought her a new outfit and new school supplies, and she couldn’t wait to see friends she hadn’t seen since the last day of eighth grade. The only problem was that Lisette forgot to set her alarm clock. On the first day of high school, she woke up at 8:10 A.M., looked at the clock, threw on some clothes, and frantically ran outside. When she got to the bus stop, she saw that it was already 8:17 A.M., and there was nobody else at the bus stop. “I can’t believe this just happened!” Lisette thought.


  1. What can’t Lisette believe just happened? Underline the details that support your inference above and write your answer below.

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Zach placed the bag of baking supplies he had just gotten from the grocery store on the counter. He looked at his recipe for chocolate chip cookies and then took out the flour, eggs, and chocolate chips. He got out his mixing bowl and baking sheet. His mouth watered as he thought about how delicious the cookies were going to be. He was supposed to take the cookies to a school event tomorrow, but he was worried that he might want to eat them all as soon as they were made. He wasn’t going to do that, but he could at least enjoy thinking about it. Then Zach realized that he had forgotten to buy milk. “I’ll be right back,” Zach told his mom as he put on his jacket and headed out the door.


  1. Where is Zach likely going? Underline the details that support your inference and write your answer below.

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Types of Inferences

Conclusion – an idea based on information, usually leaves no question about how or why something happened

Prediction – an inference about the future

Generalizationan inference that is general, not specific

Directions: Read the passage below and then answer the questions that follow.

Kiki’s Story

My name is Kiki Voisin, and I am sixteen years old. Many people tell me that I have had a very unusual life, that I’ve experienced extraordinary things for someone my age, and that I should consider myself lucky.

I was born in Paris, the capital of France, where both of my parents worked at the time. My father taught chemistry at a high school, and my mother, who is American, worked as an artist. My father died when I was two years old, and it was a struggle for my mother to support both of us on her income. She and I moved to San Francisco when I was three years old so we could be close to my grandparents. My grandmother worked at night in a restaurant.

When I was six years old, I started taking dance lessons, which were free at the local community center. I quickly discovered that I had great passion for dance, especially classical ballet. I started going to classes more often and got better with each lesson. I danced in a number of local shows, and my teachers encouraged me to stick with it. I’m grateful they did.

Last year I performed in Russia. A friend of one of my teachers invited me to perform in a ballet called The Nutcracker. My mom came along with me, and I danced in a city called St. Petersburg, which is filled with historic museums and fascinating architecture. It’s a stunning city. I can still see the glow of the streets as night fell on the city, turning the sky deep purple.

When I performed in Russia, I was the youngest dancer in the ballet group. I made many friends among other members of the group. My dearest friend was Maria. She had big blue eyes that reminded me of the sky in California. She held her arms with such grace that they seemed to float in the air. Every finger seemed so delicate. She taught me to share my soul with the audience.

I will graduate from high school in two years, and I hope to attend a special school for dancers. While school is out this summer, I plan to work in a bookstore near our apartment. I need to save as much money as I can, because next summer I hope to visit Maria in Russia. I will need to buy the plane ticket myself this time. I can’t wait to show her how much I’ve learned.


  1. Why will Kiki never forget Maria? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your inference, marking them with the number 5.

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  1. Why does Kiki feel lucky?

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  1. Why is Kiki grateful that teachers encouraged her to stick with dancing?

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  1. What does Kiki hope to do for a living? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your inference, marking them with the number 8.

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  1. How does Kiki feel about what happened during her childhood after her father died?

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  1. What does Kiki plan to do with the money that she will earn working at a bookstore during the summer?

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Evaluating the Validity of Inferences

Not every detail in a passage will provide you with information that will help you make the right inference. Some information might be misleading or put you on the wrong track. To make the correct inference, you need to evaluate validity by considering all the evidence provided. Evaluating validity involves assessing whether or not an inference is valid based on available evidence.



Directions: Read the passage below and then answer the questions that follow.

A Visit with Aunt Elena

Manuela packed excitedly for her weekend visit with Aunt Elena. Manuela felt she had a deep kinship with her aunt, and she was closer with her than with any other relative. These visits seemed too few and far between for Manuela. Other than holidays she only got to see her aunt a couple of times each year. After Manuela had finished packing, she charged downstairs and informed her father that she was ready to go.

After an hour’s drive Manuela and her father pulled up in front of Aunt Elena’s house. As always Aunt Elena was waiting for her on the porch with a big smile. Manuela kissed her father goodbye and ran up the sidewalk to begin the weekend that she had long anticipated.

Aunt Elena was a veterinarian, which is partially why Manuela admired her more than anyone else. Manuela loved animals of all kinds. Whenever Manuela came to stay with her, Aunt Elena would take Manuela to visit her veterinary office. But it was more than just a field trip for Manuela. She was expected to help Aunt Elena with her work. Although tending to the animals was sometimes a difficult task, Manuela adored every minute of it.

“Well, are you ready to be put to work?” asked Aunt Elena with a grin.

“There’s nothing else I’d rather do,” Manuela replied truthfully.

On Saturday Aunt Elena and Manuela spent the entire day at the veterinary office. As Aunt Elena went about her work, Manuela took care of animals from the kennel. She provided fresh food and water for them and took the dogs outside for exercise. She also transported the animals to and from cages when the owners came to drop off or claim their pets.

When she had completed her duties, Manuela found time to observe Aunt Elena as she examined pets and interacted with their owners. Aunt Elena was composed and confident; she clearly enjoyed her job. While watching Aunt Elena, Manuela vowed that she, too, would become a veterinarian one day.



  1. Why is Manuela excited to visit her aunt? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your inference, marking them with the number 11.

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  1. Why does the author indicate that tending animals is very difficult? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your inference, marking them with the number 12.

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  1. Why does Manuela spend the whole day on Saturday at Elena’s office? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your inference, marking them with the number 13.

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  1. Why does Manuela decide that she wants to become a veterinarian? Write your answer below and underline the details in the passage that support your inference, marking them with the number 14.

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Unit One: Literary Response & Analysis Differentiation

Assignment #5 (Strand)

Due: Wednesday, 18 January 2012

Standards Addressed: LRA3.4; LRA3.8; LRA3.10

ESLR: Resourceful Learner – Take responsibility for learning

Directions: Read the passage and answer questions 1 through 3. Circle the correct answer and answer any additional questions asked of you, following the directions provided.

Going Home

Some days, I go to school, and on the way to school, I think that there is nowhere else in the world I would rather be. No matter what time of year it is, I walk through the neighborhoods, and every morning, I see the same people I always see: the tiny old lady walking what may be the tiniest dog in the world, the man at the newsstand with the walrus mustache, the skipping twins on their way to the bus stop. I don’t know any of their names or where they live, or what their favorite foods are, or what they think about anything, but these are people I’ve known forever. In a strange way, I think of them as my friends. Every day, I smile at them, and they smile at me. The man at the newsstand says “Buenos días” in his deep voice and will sometimes comment on the weather in Spanish because years and years ago I told him that my parents spoke Spanish too, and he told me I needed to learn. When it rains, the old lady with the dog always scolds me and tells me I should carry an umbrella.

And school—it’s the same. What I like best is the routine: homeroom, English, biology, physical education, lunch, math, and social studies, then soccer practice after school. I see the same people at school every day, sit next to the same people in my classes, eat lunch with my same friends. I have friends I have known as long as I can remember. It’s as comfortable as being at home.

My parents moved into our house before I was born. I know everything there is to know about our street. The oak tree in the yard has a tree house that my father built when I was six. The sidewalk is cracked in front of our neighbors’ house from the big earthquake; we use the uneven pavement as a skate ramp. If you run past the tall fence in front of the big white house on the corner, you can see through the fence as if it didn’t exist.

At breakfast my parents give each other a look, and I know something is going to happen. Before they can say anything, I want to know what it is all about.

“Nothing bad,” my father says.

I look at my mother, and she gives me a smile of reassurance and pats my shoulder. “You should be happy, Carlos. This is only good news.” What I see on their faces is worry.

“We’re going to move,” my father says.

Today on my way to school I look at everything as if seeing it for the first time. The tiny old lady waves at me; her tiny dog wags its tail and gives a tiny bark. The man at the newsstand greets me. The skipping twins almost run me off the sidewalk, but they veer in the other direction and race off to the bus stop. I feel like a different person, a stranger, someone who really might be seeing these people for the first time. No longer are they the familiar landmarks of my daily trek to school. After I move with my family, I might never see them again, and I am filled with an indefinable feeling. I don’t know if it’s loneliness or grief.

For the first time ever, my school day is not comfortable. All day long, I feel constricted and restrained, the way you feel when it’s winter and you’re wearing layers of sweaters under your jacket, and everything feels too tight and you can’t move. My English teacher’s voice sounds high-pitched and scratchy; my friends say the same things they always do, but today it seems boring; my lunch tastes like chalk; and my pitches in P.E. class go wild, as if they have a mind of their own. In social studies, the teacher lectures from the chapter we read the night before, so it’s like knowing how the movie ends before you sit down in the theater. Going home from this day is a relief—until I remember that we’re moving.

I try to imagine living somewhere else, but all I can see is a blank space, a question mark, an empty page. All I know is my life. All I know is where I live, where I go, what I do here. I have been other places—I have visited my grandparents in Texas and my cousins in Mexico, and once we took a trip to New York. You can visit anywhere, but until you walk the same route to school every day for years, what do you know? You can know about the average rainfall and the geographic landmarks, but where is the best place to get a milkshake?

My mother comes up to my room and tells me that my father has gotten a promotion. That’s why we are moving. “Don’t you want to know where we’re going?” she asks.

“Not really,” I say. She tells me anyway. I pretend not to listen.

Every day, my parents tell me something about the town that will become our new home. There is a bronze statue honoring World War II veterans in the park downtown. In the summer, there are rodeos at the county fair. There is an annual strawberry festival. The mayor used to be a pro football player. There are oak trees in our new neighborhood, just like the one in our yard.

Images of oak trees and rodeo clowns and strawberries and statues begin to fill in the blank space in my mind. I start wondering what it might be like to live in this town where the mayor presides at all the high school football games, and the strawberries are supposed to be the best in the world.

On the day before we move, I walk in the same direction as I would if I were going to school. When I see the tiny old lady, I tell her good-bye, and she tells me to carry an umbrella when it rains. Her tiny dog holds out a tiny paw to shake my hand. The man at the newsstand shakes my hand, too. The twins wave as they board the bus. I go home, walking slowly through streets lined with oak trees.

A huge truck is parked in front of our house. The movers are carrying boxes while my parents are loading suitcases into our car. Soon our house will be empty. But not for long; I know that somewhere there are parents telling their children about a town filled with oak trees, a place where you can get the best milkshake in the world, a place where, if you’re lucky, you might see the same people every day of your life.



  1. Why does the narrator take a walk on the day before the family moves?

    1. to take one last look at everything familiar

    2. to visit the statue in the middle of town

    3. to see if the same people are still in the same places

    4. to be away from home when the movers come

Use process of elimination (P.O.E.) to answer this question. On the lines below, briefly explain how you were able to eliminate the three wrong answers.

Wrong Answer #1 ________________________________________________

Wrong Answer #2 ________________________________________________

Wrong Answer #3 ________________________________________________

  1. Read this sentence from the selection.

. . . I know that somewhere there are parents telling their children about a town filled with oak trees, a place where you can get the best milkshake in the world . . .

What makes the preceding statement ironic?

    1. the fact that, like the narrator, other children are worried about moving

    2. the fact that, like the people in the narrator’s neighborhood, most people enjoy their homes

    3. the fact that, like the narrator’s father, parents often get promotions

    4. the fact that, like the narrator’s home, every house has its stories

In your own words explain why you chose your answer. In other words, what is the difference between reality and expectation in the answer that you chose?

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  1. What does the narrator emphasize by having the narrator see the same people three different times in the story?

    1. that the narrator feels at home in this town because nothing ever changes

    2. that the narrator’s life is repetitive and boring because nothing ever changes

    3. that the new town the family is moving to will have similar people to meet

    4. that the new children who move to the narrator’s house will become comfortable in it

Use process of elimination (P.O.E.) to answer this question. On the lines below, briefly explain how you were able to eliminate the three wrong answers.

Wrong Answer #1 ________________________________________________

Wrong Answer #2 ________________________________________________

Wrong Answer #3 ________________________________________________

Assignment #6: Due Thursday, 19 January 2012

Point of View and Characterization


Standard: R3.9 – Explain how voice, persona, and the choice of a narrator affect characterization and the tone, plot and credibility of a text.

ESLR: Resourceful Learner – Take responsibility for learning

Rationale: In this lesson you will practice analyzing the point of view of a narrator and identifying techniques of characterization in passages.

Directory: cms -> lib5 -> CA01000471 -> Centricity -> Domain -> 2253
2253 -> Due: Tuesday, 14 February 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Due: Tuesday, 14 February 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Due: Monday, 12 March 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Standard w 3 – Write expository compositions, including analytical essays and research reports
2253 -> Grammar Review: Written and Oral English Language Conventions cahsee preparation: Unit One Standard(s) Addressed
2253 -> Organizer #3 of 4 Writing Strategies Differentiation Due: Tuesday, 28 February 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Homework Organizer #4 of 4 Writing Strategies Differentiation Due: Monday, 12 March 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Grammar Review: Written and Oral English Language Conventions cahsee preparation: Unit Two Standard(s) Addressed
2253 -> Organizer #1 of 4 Writing Strategies Differentiation Due: Tuesday, 24 January 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety
2253 -> Cahsee homework

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