Byline: By daniel sorid section: Section B; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 1 Length


URL: http://www.nytimes.com SUBJECT



Download 9.32 Mb.
Page24/153
Date29.04.2018
Size9.32 Mb.
1   ...   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   ...   153

URL: http://www.nytimes.com
SUBJECT: ENTREPRENEURSHIP (90%); INTERNET & WWW (89%); RENTAL PROPERTY (87%); RECESSION (77%); ECONOMIC NEWS (77%); RETAILERS (77%); CONSULTING SERVICES (76%); PROPERTY MANAGEMENT (75%); ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (73%); RETAIL BAKERIES (72%); CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES STORES (72%); EMERGING MARKETS (70%); SALES PROJECTIONS (68%); SOFTWARE MAKERS (67%); BANKING & FINANCE (65%); ECONOMIC GROWTH (63%); COMPUTER SOFTWARE (72%)
COMPANY: ADLER REAL ESTATE AG (84%)
TICKER: ADL (FRA) (84%)
INDUSTRY: NAICS236115 NEW SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSING CONSTRUCTION (EXCEPT OPERATIVE BUILDERS) (84%); SIC1521 GENERAL CONTRACTORS - SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSES (84%)
GEOGRAPHIC: NORTH CAROLINA, USA (90%); MASSACHUSETTS, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (90%); INDIA (74%)
LOAD-DATE: December 11, 2008
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Jeff Takle, right, of Rentingyourhome.com, with Richard Banfield of Fresh Tilled Soil, an investor.(PHOTOGRAPH BY JODI HILTON FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)
PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company



75 of 1231 DOCUMENTS

The New York Times
December 9, 2008 Tuesday

Late Edition - Final


Christie Hefner Stepping Down as Chief at Playboy
BYLINE: By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
SECTION: Section B; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 2
LENGTH: 553 words
In a decision that surprised the industry and even the management of her own company, the chairwoman and chief executive of Playboy Enterprises, Christie Hefner, announced Monday that she was resigning from the company her father, Hugh Hefner, had founded.

Ms. Hefner, 56, a highly regarded executive who has worked for Playboy since 1975, said she would not look for another full-time corporate job after she leaves the company in January, but would seek nonprofit work and board positions among other interests.

''I've always known that I wanted to move on at some point in my career,'' Ms. Hefner said in an interview. ''I've given a great deal of my life to the company.''

The company's strategy is not likely to change drastically; Mr. Hefner, 82, is still the controlling shareholder.

No replacement has been named for Ms. Hefner, and the announcement was so unexpected that the board has not even named an executive search firm to find her successor. Jerome H. Kern, a board member, will become interim chairman.

Ms. Hefner leaves Playboy at a difficult time for the company and the media industry. In the third quarter, Playboy posted a net loss of $5.2 million, versus a profit of $2.6 million a year earlier. Without a one-time overhaul charge, the quarter would have produced a profit of $1.1 million.

The magazine is facing rising printing, paper and distribution costs, and ad pages through the September issue were down 15.5 percent from a year earlier, according to Publishers Information Bureau.

The availability of free pornography online makes it difficult for Playboy's video channels, which charge for pornographic content, to compete.

Ms. Hefner said she thought the business was on solid ground despite its current challenges. ''If my strategy had been never to leave until there are no challenges and no opportunities, I would never have been able to leave,'' she said.

Ms. Hefner, who became chief executive in 1988, shut down the original Playboy Clubs, a chain of nightclubs featuring waitresses dressed in Playboy bunny costumes; helped begin Playboy TV and Playboy.com; and directed the successful expansion to licensing the Playboy brand during her tenure.

''Christie is well-respected, is always very articulate in her vision, and I think has had a really tough job for the past couple of years in a business with real secular challenges,'' said David Bank, an analyst with RBC Capital Markets.

Mr. Hefner's attachment to the company, analysts said, has partly shackled its progress. Several have suggested that Playboy license the magazine to another publisher, an idea the company has deflected because of Mr. Hefner's enthusiasm for Playboy magazine, said David Miller, an analyst at Caris & Company. He added that ''Playboy will never sell that magazine, at least while Mr. Hefner is alive.''

Ms. Hefner said her father was supportive of her move, and she did not expect that a nonfamily successor would bring major change.

''I actually succeeded as president someone who'd been brought in from outside the company,'' she said. ''There should always be an openness to professional management.''

''Hef is going to provide ample family continuity, if you will,'' she said.

Playboy shares closed up more than 21 percent in Monday trading, to $2.13 a share.


URL: http://www.nytimes.com
SUBJECT: ENTREPRENEURSHIP (90%); BUSINESS FORECASTS (78%); INTERVIEWS (78%); APPOINTMENTS (78%); COMPANY LOSSES (73%); EMPLOYMENT SERVICES (71%); DRINKING PLACES (66%); INDUSTRY ANALYSTS (63%); SHAREHOLDERS (53%)
COMPANY: ROYAL BANK OF CANADA (61%); PUBLISHERS INFORMATION BUREAU (54%)
TICKER: RY (TSX) (61%); RY (NYSE) (61%)
INDUSTRY: NAICS522293 INTERNATIONAL TRADE FINANCING (61%); NAICS522110 COMMERCIAL BANKING (61%); SIC6029 COMMERCIAL BANKS, NEC (61%)
PERSON: CHRISTIE HEFNER (97%)
LOAD-DATE: December 9, 2008
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
GRAPHIC: PHOTO: After three decades at Playboy, Christie Hefner said she wants to do nonprofit work.(PHOTOGRAPH BY PLAYBOY)
PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company



76 of 1231 DOCUMENTS

The New York Times
December 9, 2008 Tuesday

The New York Times on the Web


Making Hard Times Work for Your Business
BYLINE: By PAUL B. BROWN
SECTION: Section ; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; TOOL KIT; Pg.
LENGTH: 650 words
Times are tough, and now, especially, every small business is looking for ways to increase efficiency and cut costs.

These ideas could help.

LEMONS INTO LEMONADE? The current challenging environment is actually an opportunity, Michael Kanazawa argues on Slackermanager.com, but only if entrepreneurs look at these hard times in the right way.

The obvious reaction to an economic slowdown is to tell the staff to do more with less. But that strategy, Mr. Kanazawa says, is rarely effective because when resources are substantially cut, ''people are spread too thin and can't finish any single project or task with quality and diligence.'' That, he says, ''is a root cause of poor execution.''

Mr. Kanazawa's recommendation is to tell employees ''we need to do more on less, meaning more resources, more staffingand more focus on fewer initiatives.'' The result of this approach, he says, ''is a prioritization of the most important and high-impact initiatives and getting the new levels of resources focused for delivering results on those top priorities.''

CHEAP BENEFITS Overtime, the office holiday party and the company's off-site gatherings at the wonderful resort on the water may be off the table for the immediate future. But there still are some inexpensive benefits you can offer you employees, writes Entrepreneur magazine.

Here are three ideas the magazine suggests:

''Negotiate discounts with local merchants for your employees. Hotels, restaurants and amusement parks may offer discounts on their various attractions, including lodging and food through corporate customer programs.''

Sign up with a credit union. This is ''one of the most appreciated, but most overlooked,'' benefits. Employees will probably ''increase their savings rates especially if you offer automatic payroll deduction, have access to lower loan rates and pay lower fees -- if any -- for services.''

Provide free, in-house, lunchtime seminars. Financial planners, lawyers and ''other professionals will often offer their speaking services at no charge.''

ANOTHER FREEBIE Here is a list of the five employee benefits most popular with workers: medical plans, paid vacations, defined benefit plans, defined contribution plans and flex time, ITBusinessEdge reports.

While the first four can be expensive, the odds are that offering flex-time will cost you little (if anything).

TALK IS CHEAP Communicating with employees usually does not cost a small business much. So make sure you continue to do it, especially now, as Diane Domeyer writes on Allbusiness.com.

''A common response to changing times is to limit communication, usually by cutting back on internal newsletters, canceling staff meetings and conducting closed-door strategy sessions,'' she says. ''Employees want to know where the company stands -- where they stand -- and they want to hear this from you, not the rumor mill.''

FREE IS GOOD Before you sign up (and pay) for a basic marketing seminar -- something like How to Win New Customers -- or a book on the best way to prepare a business plan, visit the online courses offered by the Small Business Administration. The link is: http://www.sba.gov/services/training/onlinecourses/index.html.

The courses are free.

LAST CALL One way to do more with less is to have your customers do the work for you.

It sounds ridiculous on its face, but as HR.compoints out it isn't.

''When was the last time you walked inside your bank to do a transaction? If you can't recall, you are in good company. We use ATMs. We book travel arrangements online. We even fill our own drink cups at our favorite hamburger stop.'' . To which we would add: Most of us pump our own gas, check ourselves in at the airport and sometimes even pay for and bag our own groceries.

The message is clear: Look for places where you can ''outsource'' to your customers the work your employees used to do.


URL: http://www.nytimes.com
SUBJECT: SMALL BUSINESS (90%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (89%); EMPLOYMENT (89%); FLEXTIME (88%); ECONOMIC DECLINE (76%); PENSION & RETIREMENT PLANS (74%); HOLIDAY & VACATION LEAVE (74%); OVERTIME (74%); ECONOMIC NEWS (72%); FRIENDLY & PROVIDENT SOCIETIES (71%); TRAVEL HOSPITALITY & TOURISM (71%); DESTINATIONS & ATTRACTIONS (71%); DEFINED BENEFIT PLANS (69%); THEME PARKS (66%); RESTAURANTS (65%); INTEREST RATES (62%); FINANCIAL PLANNING (62%); AMUSEMENT & THEME PARKS (66%)
LOAD-DATE: December 10, 2008
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company



77 of 1231 DOCUMENTS

The New York Times
December 8, 2008 Monday

Late Edition - Final


Popular Demand
BYLINE: By SHELLY FREIERMAN
SECTION: Section B; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 9
LENGTH: 193 words
CNN has been testing a newspaper wire service in some 30 publications, and it held a meeting in Atlanta last week to introduce the service to more newspapers. The CNN brand is doing very well online: during the week ended Nov. 29, for example, it was second in visitor share only to Yahoo News in the news and information category.

All of this is fed by the strength of the cable network news division. On election night, CNN led all cable networks in household ratings from 8 to 11 p.m. E.S.T., and all networks except for ABC from 8 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. SHELLY FREIERMAN

; MUSIC DOWNLOADS: Nov. 24 through 30. (*Program at least 30 minutes long. A ratings point is 1.1 million homes. Change is from a year ago. Data collected through Nov. 17; Forbes, Entrepreneur include special sections.

Titles are a percentage of the top title's index value of 100. <7>Share of visitors from other web sites to CNN.com.)(Sources: Nielsen Media Research (television); Hitwise (Popular Demand); Screenline (movies); Home Media Magazine (DVD rentals); Mediaweek (magazines) Nielsen SoundScan/Billboard (music))


URL: http://www.nytimes.com
SUBJECT: TELEVISION PROGRAMMING (90%); CABLE TELEVISION (90%); CABLE INDUSTRY (90%); TELEVISION RATINGS & SHARES (90%); TELEVISION INDUSTRY (90%); NEWS SYNDICATION (78%); ONLINE CONTENT & INFORMATION SERVICES (78%); MUSIC INDUSTRY (74%); VIDEO SALES & RENTALS (65%)
COMPANY: NIELSEN MEDIA RESEARCH (83%)
LOAD-DATE: December 8, 2008
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
GRAPHIC: CHARTS: CLICKING TO CNN: Share of upstream traffic, Nov. 23-29<7>.

MAGAZINES: Ad pages, December 2008.

BROADCAST TELEVISION: Nov. 24 through 30.*

MOVIE BOX OFFICE: Weekend estimates in millions.

MUSIC ALBUMS: Nov. 24 through 30.

CABLE TELEVISION: Nov. 24 through 30.*

DVD RENTALS: Nov. 24 through 30.
PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company



78 of 1231 DOCUMENTS

The New York Times
December 8, 2008 Monday

The New York Times on the Web


People and Accounts of Note
BYLINE: By THE NEW YORK TIMES
SECTION: Section ; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; WEBDENDA; Pg.
LENGTH: 1184 words
Bill Allen joined BooneOakley, Charlotte, N.C., as head of interactive development, leading a new interactive department. He had been associate creative director at 22Squared, Atlanta.

Dennis Armbruster and Andrew Mitchell joined LoyaltyOne, Toronto, part of Alliance Data. Mr. Armbruster becomes managing partner at LoyaltyOne Consulting; he succeeds Kelly Hlavinka, who joined Colloquy as managing partner. Mr. Armbruster had served in posts that include vice president for customer loyalty and customer relationship management at Carlson Marketing Worldwide, part of the Carlson Companies. Mr. Mitchell becomes vice president for business development at LoyaltyOne, which is a new post. Mr. Mitchell had been at RBC Royal Bank, overseeing the RBC Rewards program.

Ron Bernstein joined Travel Ad Network, New York, as senior vice president for sales, a new post. He had been senior vice president and general manager for online sales and marketing at USNews.com, part of U.S. News & World Report, owned by Mortimer B. Zuckerman.

Jerry Berowne joined the Torrance, Calif., office of Saatchi & Saatchi, part of the Publicis Groupe, as brand planning director on the Toyota Motor account. He succeeds Don Longfellow, who became planning director at the Culver City, Calif., office of Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide, part of the WPP Group. Mr. Berowne had been running a company he co-founded, Galaxy Research and Planning, Sydney, Australia, and before that worked at the Sydney office of Saatchi & Saatchi.

Ann Burkart joined Sony Pictures Entertainment, Culver City, Calif., part of the Sony Corporation of America, as vice president for global communications. She had been vice president for communications at Fox Interactive Media, Los Angeles, part of News Corporation.

Linda Boff, chief marketing officer at iVillage Properties, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., part of the NBC Universal division of General Electric, joined G.E. in Fairfield, Conn., as global director for marketing communications, reporting to Beth Comstock, senior vice president and chief marketing officer.

Broadway Across America, New York, opened a division, B.A.A.-Marketing Solutions, a tour and event marketing unit to be led by Amy Gentry, senior director for marketing at Broadway Across America.

Karen Driscoll and Diana Polvere joined Sesame Workshop, New York, in new posts. Ms. Driscoll becomes vice president for marketing services; she had most recently been a marketing consultant for Worldwide Biggies and before that worked at the Nickelodeon cable channel. Ms. Polvere becomes vice president for marketing intelligence; she had been a team leader in the global marketplace group at American Express Company.

Scott Farrell, co-managing director for the Chicago headquarters office and Central region at GolinHarris, part of the Interpublic Group of Companies, was named president at the agency's new global corporate communications practice.

Havas Sports and Entertainment, part of the Havas Media division of Havas, opened an office in Amsterdam, to be led by Denise Noordermeer, former director at MPG Sponsorships, part of the MPG unit of Havas.

Jon Hickey joined Allen & Gerritsen, Watertown, Mass., as senior vice president and managing director for a new unit, A&G Sports and Entertainment. He had been senior vice president for sports and entertainment marketing at Mullen, Wenham, Mass., part of the Interpublic Group of Companies.

Jerry Ketel, creative director and senior partner at Leopold Ketel & Partners, Portland, Ore., was promoted to president.

David Lubars was named the chairman of the juries for film (commercials) and press (print advertisements) at the 56th annual International Advertising Festival, to be held in Cannes, France, on June 21-27, 2009. Mr. Lubars is chairman and chief creative officer at BBDO North America, New York, part of the BBDO Worldwide division of the Omnicom Group.

MGM Mirage, Las Vegas, expanded its relationship with David & Goliath, El Segundo, Calif., by awarding the agency the creative assignment for its Monte Carlo Resort and Casino, which had been handled by Riester, Phoenix. Spending was estimated at $1 million. David & Goliath already creates campaigns for the New York-New York Hotel and Casino owned by MGM Mirage.

Noodles and Company, Broomfield, Colo., named Carmichael Lynch, Minneapolis, part of the Interpublic Group of Companies, to handle tasks like brand strategy and creative development; the Carmichael Lynch Spong division will handle public relations. Noodles and Company, which has almost 200 locations in 18 states, previously worked with Sukie Design and Advertising, Denver. Spending was not disclosed.

Three executives of Pace Press, Moonachie, N.J. -- Seth Diamond, Jack Mangiciarina and Jonathan Vitale -- joined DG3 North America, Jersey City, N.J., part of the DG3 (Diversified Global Graphics Group) Group of Companies, in senior sales roles after Pace closed.

Britt Peterson, director for new business development at Cole & Weber, Seattle, was promoted to partner and will continue to lead new-business efforts. The agency is part of the United unit of the WPP Group.

The Publicis Groupe, Paris, acquired W&K Communications, Beijing and Guangzhou, China. Financial terms were not disclosed. The agency will be renamed the Leo Burnett Beijing Advertising Company and become part of the Leo Burnett Greater China operations.

Red Tettemer, Philadelphia, joined with a client, Ska Brewing Company, Durango, Colo., to introduce Tub Gin, distilled by the Peach Street Distillers unit of Ska. The agency developed the brand and merchandising materials with Prohibition-era and bootlegger themes; the gin will begin to be distributed in 2009.

Megan Sczesny joined TM Advertising, part of the Interpublic Group of Companies, as an account supervisor in the Seattle office. She had been an account manager at Borders Perrin Norrander, Portland, Ore.

Michael Shelton joined Cynopsis Media, Shelton, Conn., as director for business development and sales. He had most recently been director for technology advertising at Broadcasting & Cable and Multichannel News, part of the Reed Business Information unit of the Reed Elsevier Group.

Kurt Stirnkorb joined AbelsonTaylor, Chicago, as senior interactive developer. He had been president at Stirnkorb.com, Chicago.

The Telemundo Communications Group, Miami, part of the NBC Universal unit of General Electric, signed two content-development deals with the Vidal Partnership, New York, for agency clients to be integrated into episodes of two Telemundo series, ''Letra y Musica'' and ''Sin Senos No Hay Paraiso.''

Susan D. Whiting, executive vice president at the Nielsen Company, New York, was promoted to vice chairwoman, joining David Calhoun, chairman and chief executive, in a new office of the chief executive.



Ryan Wilson joined the Chicago office of Zig, part of MDC Partners, as a strategist, overseeing planning and brand strategy for clients. He had been senior account planner at Energy BBDO, which is the Chicago office of BBDO Worldwide, part of the Omnicom Group.
URL: http://www.nytimes.com
SUBJECT: MARKETING & ADVERTISING AGENCIES (89%); MARKETING & ADVERTISING SERVICES (89%); INTERACTIVE MARKETING & ADVERTISING (78%); CONSULTING SERVICES (77%); SPONSORSHIP (76%); BRANDING (76%); BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT (76%); LOYALTY MARKETING (76%); MARKET RESEARCH & ANALYSIS (76%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (75%); CHILDREN'S PROGRAMMING (74%); CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT (72%); ONLINE MARKETING & ADVERTISING (71%); CABLE TELEVISION (60%); EVENT MARKETING (56%)
COMPANY: HAVAS SA (84%); ROYAL BANK OF CANADA (83%); CARLSON COS INC (83%); OGILVY & MATHER WORLDWIDE (83%); U S NEWS & WORLD REPORT INC (69%); NEWS CORP (66%); FOX INTERACTIVE MEDIA (66%); AMERICAN EXPRESS CO (62%); INTERPUBLIC GROUP OF COS INC (61%); CARLSON MARKETING GROUP INC (57%); TOYOTA MOTOR CORP (55%); WPP PLC (55%); SONY CORP OF AMERICA (54%); SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT INC (54%); GENERAL ELECTRIC CO (53%); NBC UNIVERSAL INC (53%); ALLEN & GERRITSEN (50%)
TICKER: HAV (PAR) (84%); RY (TSX) (83%); RY (NYSE) (83%); NWS (NYSE) (66%); NWS (ASX) (66%); AXP (NYSE) (62%); IPG (NYSE) (61%); TYT (LSE) (55%); TM (NYSE) (55%); 7203 (TSE) (55%); WPPGY (NASDAQ) (55%); WPP (LSE) (55%); GNE (PAR) (53%); GEC (LSE) (53%); GEB (BRU) (53%); GE (NYSE) (53%); NWS (NASDAQ) (66%)
INDUSTRY: NAICS541810 ADVERTISING AGENCIES (84%); NAICS541613 MARKETING CONSULTING SERVICES (84%); SIC8742 MANAGEMENT CONSULTING SERVICES (84%); SIC7311 ADVERTISING AGENCIES (84%); NAICS541830 MEDIA BUYING AGENCIES (84%); SIC7319 ADVERTISING, NEC (84%); NAICS522293 INTERNATIONAL TRADE FINANCING (83%); NAICS522110 COMMERCIAL BANKING (83%); SIC6029 COMMERCIAL BANKS, NEC (83%); NAICS522210 CREDIT CARD ISSUING (62%); SIC6141 PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS (62%); NAICS541820 PUBLIC RELATIONS AGENCIES (61%); SIC8743 PUBLIC RELATIONS AGENCIES (61%); NAICS336112 LIGHT TRUCK & UTILITY VEHICLE MANUFACTURING (55%); NAICS336111 AUTOMOBILE MANUFACTURING (55%); NAICS512110 MOTION PICTURE & VIDEO PRODUCTION (54%); SIC7812 MOTION PICTURE & VIDEO TAPE PRODUCTION (54%); SIC7822 MOTION PICTURE & VIDEO TAPE DISTRIBUTION (54%); NAICS336412 AIRCRAFT ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS MANUFACTURING (53%); NAICS335222 HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR & HOME FREEZER MANUFACTURING (53%); NAICS335211 ELECTRIC HOUSEWARES & HOUSEHOLD FAN MANUFACTURING (53%); NAICS515120 TELEVISION BROADCASTING (53%); SIC4833 TELEVISION BROADCASTING STATIONS (53%)
GEOGRAPHIC: CHARLOTTE, NC, USA (92%); SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA (90%); LOS ANGELES, CA, USA (79%) CALIFORNIA, USA (93%); NORTH CAROLINA, USA (92%); NEW YORK, USA (92%); NEW JERSEY, USA (79%); MASSACHUSETTS, USA (79%); NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA (55%); CONNECTICUT, USA (53%) UNITED STATES (94%); AUSTRALIA (69%)
LOAD-DATE: December 9, 2008
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company



79 of 1231 DOCUMENTS

The New York Times
December 7, 2008 Sunday

Late Edition - Final


When the Support System Needs Some Herself
BYLINE: By ERICKA V. MITCHELL
SECTION: Section A; Column 0; Metropolitan Desk; THE NEEDIEST CASES; Pg. 49
LENGTH: 884 words
Laverne Westcott, a youthful-looking 51, had grown accustomed to living on her own in the Bronx. Having raised two daughters who had since moved out, Ms. Westcott was enjoying her empty-nester freedom: coming home from work to a quiet household, relaxing and occasionally having a girls-night-in party with her mother and a few of their friends.

''I was ready to do me. I thought it was my turn -- then it turns out that it wasn't my turn anymore,'' said Ms. Westcott, who has worked as a patient-care technician at Bellevue Hospital Center for the past 20 years.

Ms. Westcott's elder daughter, Lorraine Wright, 36, has three children of her own: a son, Kamel, 12, and two daughters, Chardonay, 8, and Camara, 18.

After moving to Columbia, Md., nine years ago to make a better life for her family, Ms. Wright decided to pursue a career as an X-ray technician. However, working full time and going to school part time often left the children without an adult at home -- something that worried Ms. Westcott.

''By her working, the kids were left alone for a little bit, and I had a problem with that,'' Ms. Westcott said. ''When she went to school there was no supervision, and she was raised with supervision, with someone always there to give her guidance.''

Kamel, who has been found to have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, was not getting the care that he needed, Ms. Westcott said. Camara, a teenager herself, was not able to provide the household with the proper structure while her mother was not home.

Ms. Westcott offered to help take care of her grandchildren until her daughter finished her degree. Making several round trips by bus between New York and Maryland took a toll on Ms. Westcott's finances, which put her behind on her rent. Within a few months, Ms. Westcott owed $2,396 to the landlord.

Ms. Westcott, a recipient of Section 8 housing assistance, was responsible for $767 of her $1,149 rent. Although she was facing her own financial problems, she did not hesitate last November when she got a call from her daughter asking if Kamel and Chardonay could live with her until Ms. Wright finished her degree, which she expected would take four years.

''I have more family support here than she does -- she has nobody out there in Maryland,'' Ms. Westcott said. ''She does not have the family structure that we have here. I wanted them to have what she had when she was growing up. That when you come through the door, someone is going to be there.''

Chardonay and Kamel arrived for Thanksgiving last year and have been with Ms. Westcott since.

At first the transition was hard, especially for Kamel. Both children missed their mother and what they knew as home.

Ms. Westcott enrolled Kamel in the Academy of Scholarship and Entrepreneurship (at the Intermediate School 98 campus, a Children's Aid Society community school), where she met Elizabeth Kirby, a caseworker at Children's Aid, one of the seven agencies supported by The New York Times Neediest Cases Fund. Learning of Ms. Westcott's financial problems, Ms. Kirby was able to tap the fund, getting Ms. Westcott $824.13 for her rent arrears, $750 toward bunk beds for the children and $200 for school uniforms.

Ms. Westcott now has full custody of the two children. Because they have been added to the lease, her portion of the rent has been reduced to $543, which eases her financial burden somewhat.

''Elizabeth is an angel; she came into my life just when I needed her,'' Ms. Westcott said.

Despite the sacrifices, Ms. Westcott is happy to have her grandchildren with her. ''Kids grow up and move out and you get kind of lonely, but having my grandkids put life back into my home.''

How to Help

Checks payable to The New York Times Neediest Cases Fund may be sent to:

4 Chase Metrotech Center, 7th Floor East, Lockbox 5193, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11245.

All gifts are acknowledged; special letters are not possible. Checks intended for a particular Neediest agency should be written to and mailed to the agency, noting that it is a Neediest gift.

BROOKLYN BUREAU OF COMMUNITY SERVICE 285 Schermerhorn Street Brooklyn, N.Y. 11217

CATHOLIC CHARITIES, DIOCESE OF BROOKLYN AND QUEENS 191 Joralemon Street Brooklyn, N.Y. 11201

CATHOLIC CHARITIES OF THE ARCHDIOCESE OF NEW YORK 1011 First Avenue New York, N.Y. 10022

CHILDREN'S AID SOCIETY 105 East 22nd Street New York, N.Y. 10010

COMMUNITY SERVICE SOCIETY OF NEW YORK 105 East 22nd Street New York, N.Y. 10010

FEDERATION OF PROTESTANT WELFARE AGENCIES 281 Park Avenue South New York, N.Y. 10010

UJA-FEDERATION OF NEW YORK Church Street Station P.O. Box 4100

New York, N.Y. 10261-4100 Donations may be made with a credit card by phone at (800) 381-0075 or online, courtesy of NYCharities.org at www.nytimes.com/neediest or www.nycharities.org/neediest.

For instructions on how to donate stock to the fund, call (212) 556-1137 or fax (212) 730- 0927.

No agents or solicitors are authorized to seek contributions for The New York Times Neediest Cases Fund.

The Times pays the fund's expenses, so all contributions go directly to the charities, which use them to provide services and cash assistance to the poor.

Contributions are deductible from federal, state and city income taxes to the extent permitted by law.

To delay may mean to forget.



Download 9.32 Mb.

Share with your friends:
1   ...   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   ...   153




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2020
send message

    Main page