Byline: By daniel sorid section: Section B; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 1 Length


URL: http://www.nytimes.com SUBJECT



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URL: http://www.nytimes.com
SUBJECT: HOTELS & MOTELS (90%); SMALL BUSINESS (90%); LEGISLATIVE BODIES (90%); VETERANS (90%); NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (90%); AUDITS (89%); INVESTIGATIONS (89%); SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE (89%); US FEDERAL GOVERNMENT (89%); MINORITY BUSINESS ASSISTANCE (78%); CHARITIES (78%); US REPUBLICAN PARTY (78%); US DEMOCRATIC PARTY (74%); BUDGET (73%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (73%); DISABLED PERSONS (68%)
PERSON: JOHN KERRY (67%); OLYMPIA SNOWE (67%)
GEOGRAPHIC: BOSTON, MA, USA (79%) MASSACHUSETTS, USA (92%); CALIFORNIA, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (92%)
LOAD-DATE: December 30, 2008
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company



5 of 1231 DOCUMENTS

The New York Times
December 30, 2008 Tuesday

Late Edition - Final


Paid Notice: Deaths GREENWALD, JANE
SECTION: Section A; Column 0; Classified; Pg. 18
LENGTH: 138 words
GREENWALD--Jane, 80, formerly of Hewlett, NY, died December 28. She was a true woman of her time. She was married to the late Phil Greenwald and was a loving homemaker, raising six children. In the late 1960's, she became a champion of women's rights and an early opponent of the Vietnam War. In the 1970's, she was seized by the entrepreneurial spirit and founded an advertising agency, which she ran successfully for a decade. Afterwards, she traveled the world, settling for a time in Vancouver, BC. In her late years, she returned to New York City to be with her family. She is survived by her children, Jonathan, Susan, Judson, Jennifer, Joseph, and Abraham; 14 grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. Funeral Services will be held Tuesday, December 30, 12 noon at Boulevard Riverside Chapels, 1450 Broadway, Hewlett, NY.
URL: http://www.nytimes.com
SUBJECT: DEATHS & OBITUARIES (92%); WOMEN (88%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (69%); VIETNAM WAR (55%); MARKETING & ADVERTISING (54%)
GEOGRAPHIC: VANCOUVER, BC, CANADA (53%); NEW YORK, NY, USA (52%) NEW YORK, USA (78%); BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA (53%) UNITED STATES (78%); CANADA (53%)
LOAD-DATE: December 30, 2008
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
DOCUMENT-TYPE: Paid Death Notice
PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company



6 of 1231 DOCUMENTS

The New York Times
December 29, 2008 Monday

Late Edition - Final


Blues, Masekela Memories and Festive Exuberance Drive an Ailey Season
BYLINE: By ROSLYN SULCAS
SECTION: Section C; Column 0; The Arts/Cultural Desk; DANCE REVIEW ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER; Pg. 6
LENGTH: 784 words
''Blues Suite'' was Alvin Ailey's first full-scale work, created in 1958 for his fledgling company. Its setting is a brothel, or at least a house of dubious repute, and its subject is the blues -- both the music and the deeply felt emotions it expresses -- described by Ailey in an early program note as ''from the very souls of their creators.''

That deeply felt emotion wasn't all that apparent onstage on Friday night, when Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater performed the piece, which has been revived by Masazumi Chaya for the troupe's 50th-anniversary season. (It was last performed in 2000.) Instead ''Blues Suite'' felt enjoyable in an uncomplicated, theatrical way not least because of the onstage presence of the wonderful musicians Kenny Brawner and the Brawner Brothers, playing the accompanying songs, credited simply as ''traditional.''

Before the curtain even rises, the sound of Mr. Brawner singing is the stuff of an immediate good mood. And when it does rise, on the dancers posed dramatically in an almost painterly chiaroscuro light, the force of Ailey's theatricality is immediately compelling.

That theatricality, the jazzy movement vocabulary and the clever juxtaposition of dances that show us isolated episodes both funny and sad, keeps ''Blues Suite'' vibrant and inventive. But the piece is performed with a slickness and exaggeration that robs it of the tug at the heartstrings that you can't help feeling must have once been there. The three melancholy women in ''The House of the Rising Sun'' over-emote badly; when Constance Stamatiou and Amos J. Machanic Jr. fight and push each other around in ''Backwater Blues'' the effect is of slapstick, not the inexorable tragicomedy of human relationships.

This bright, performative style -- showing a world in which women are clever and sassy, and men are eager and a bit dim -- permeates much of the Ailey repertory. Even ''Masekela Langage,'' a mostly somber 1969 work set to the stirring music of the South African trumpeter Hugh Masekela, takes on this overtone in its depiction of a night in a shebeen (at the time, an illegal township bar, which this set doesn't even vaguely resemble).

It's a piece that shows how economically Ailey could use movement and gesture to convey emotional drama, but it needs the kind of restrained presentation I saw the company give in June at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. On Friday the general air of ennui and lurking danger felt generally stagy rather than disturbing, although there were impressive individual performances: from Marcus Jarrell Willis, as a jerky-limbed addict; from Glenn Allen Sims, as a demagogue attempting to rouse the crowd from its torpor; and from Abdur-Rahim Jackson, as the bloodstained man who dies as the ensemble stares indifferently forward.

The presentational manner that the company espouses worked better on Saturday night's program, which offered Maurice Bejart's 1970 ''Firebird,'' Mauro Bigonzetti's new ''Festa Barocca'' and ''Revelations'' (which also concluded Friday's program).

''Firebird,'' though set to Stravinsky, is a rather underpowered work (for which, given Bejart's penchant for excess, one should be grateful), chiefly notable for the opportunities it offers two male dancers who enact the bird and the rising phoenix that replaces it at its death. (The poor dears have to wear red lycra body tights with cut-out chests, which managed to be unflattering even to the godlike Clifton Brown and Jamar Roberts. But ''Firebird'' is a ballet, and although Mr. Brown and Mr. Roberts are wonderful dancers, they do not have the kind of refined ballet technique needed here, and so the piece feels even flatter than it might.

In ''Festa Barocca'' no kind of refinement is needed as the dancers gesture, twitch and gyrate frenetically to some of Handel's most beautiful arias. The audience loved this, as though they were privy to some sort of insider joke. But its frantic group sections alternating with fake-intense, semi-sexy, semi-anguished duets (with much use of that '90s dance trope: hand held against partner's forehead to support one's weight) had absolutely no theatrical or dance logic. Only Matthew Rushing brought brief coherence in a short solo to the Andante Allegro, full of undulating upper-body ripples and wildly gesticulating arms, nonetheless performed with quiet dignity.

On both evenings ''Revelations,'' which might lend itself best of all to overplaying, was beautifully danced. Here the dancers seem to trust the choreography to speak for itself.

Alvin Ailey's season continues through Jan. 4 at New York City Center, 131 West 55th Street, Manhattan, (212) 581-1212, nycitycenter.org.
URL: http://www.nytimes.com
SUBJECT: DANCE (90%); MUSIC (90%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (78%); ARTISTS & PERFORMERS (77%); THEATER (75%); ANNIVERSARIES (54%); SINGERS & MUSICIANS (77%)
GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (72%) NEW YORK, USA (72%) UNITED STATES (72%)
LOAD-DATE: December 29, 2008
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Constance Stamatiou, third from left, and other members of the Alvin Ailey company in ''Festa Barocca.'' Choreographed by Mauro Bigonzetti, it is a suite set to familiar arias by Handel.

Maurice Bejart's ''Firebird,'' set to Stravinsky, with Clifton Brown (in the center, aloft) and Jamar Roberts (below him). (PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANDREA MOHIN/THE NEW YORK TIMES)


DOCUMENT-TYPE: Review
PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company



7 of 1231 DOCUMENTS

The New York Times
December 29, 2008 Monday

Late Edition - Final


Obscure Fee Pays for Efficient-Energy Projects
BYLINE: By KEN BELSON; Ford Fessenden, Daniel E. Slotnik and Tom Torok contributed reporting.
SECTION: Section A; Column 0; Metropolitan Desk; Pg. 19
LENGTH: 1063 words
It is an inscrutable abbreviation often overlooked on electric bills: SBC/RPS. For the typical New York City apartment dweller, it amounts to $1.08 a month, barely enough for a cup of coffee.

But the SBC portion, which stands for System Benefits Charge, helped an entrepreneurial couple in Binghamton revive a foreclosed ice rink, created a $1 million-a-year cottage industry of energy audits for a midsize engineering firm near Albany and has provided rebates to at least 19 laundromats that bought energy-efficient air-conditioners and lights.

Introduced in 1998 as a way to reduce the strain on the state's electric grid and reduce environmental damage, the fee was nearly doubled in October, to 0.30 cent per kilowatt-hour from 0.18 cent. Those fractions of pennies are expected to bring in $350 million this year, up from $178 million each of the last two years and $89 million a year before that.

An analysis of how the money has been used over the past decade shows that a disproportionate amount goes upstate: Con Edison customers paid half of the state's total SBC charges, while 41 percent of the rebates, loans and other benefits handed out by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority went to the areas of New York City and Westchester County covered by Con Ed. At the same time, customers of National Grid, the utility that serves northern and western New York State, contributed about one-quarter of the SBC funds, yet a third of the benefits went to their area.

And some of the money goes to arm's-length initiatives that do not directly reduce energy use. Nearly $20 million has been spent on advertising campaigns designed to persuade New Yorkers to install compact fluorescent bulbs and use their air-conditioners sparingly. Another $11.5 million went to feasibility studies for businesses considering new equipment. Nearly $500,000 was spent on brochures, annual reports and other printing costs.

More than $100 million, however, has been spent on at least 45 power systems that recycle the steam produced by natural gas generators, which have been installed in office towers in Manhattan, including The New York Times Building, a Pepsi-Cola bottling plant in Queens and Voila Bakeries in Brooklyn. Some $21 million in low-interest loans went to temples and churches, health care facilities like the Odd Fellow & Rebekah Rehab center in Lockport, and an array of businesses, from the Chocolate Gecko in Albany to a Remington firearms plant in Ilion. And $537,240 helped the city of Syracuse replace its incandescent traffic lights with LED signals that save more than four million kilowatt-hours a year.

''The crime is that people don't know about these programs,'' said Rusty Shriner, who manages the Palisades Ice Rink in West Nyack, which received $108,584 from the authority in 2004 and 2005.

The rink used the SBC money to buy a new condenser that freezes ice efficiently; ceiling insulation; a system that recovers heat from the refrigeration machinery and reuses it to supply hot water; and a system that automates the electrical machinery, cutting the rink's electric costs by about 40 percent. ''Ice rinks run on slim margins,'' Mr. Shriner said, ''so controlling energy costs is probably the most important thing you can do.''

Through 2005, $41.4 million in SBC funds was used to reimburse New Yorkers who installed solar panels and wind turbines; since then, such rebates have been paid for with money from the other half of the SBC/RPS line item, the Renewable Portfolio Standard, which is on track to collect $62 million in 2008.

In all, the authority estimates that SBC money has paid for items that have reduced electricity demand during the past decade by 650 megawatts, or about what a big power plant can produce. Another 550 megawatts can be saved by commercial users who have signed up for authority programs offering reimbursements for turning down lights, air-conditioners and other electricity hogs. The agency says that these programs have created 4,700 jobs over the past decade and that they helped utility customers save $570 million in 2007.

The 250-employee agency, with its own inscrutable acronym, Nyserda, is governed by the Public Service Commission, whose five members are appointed by the governor. But as its pool of money from utility fees has deepened, a growing number of state lawmakers have tried to bring it under their control, arguing that the SBC charges amount to a tax imposed by unelected officials with little public input.

''It has become larger and far more significant, which is why I thought it should be on budget,'' said Assemblyman Kevin A. Cahill, a Democrat representing Dutchess and Ulster Counties who is chairman of the energy committee and said he plans to introduce legislation to that effect next year. ''We've reached a point where larger policy considerations should be considered. It shouldn't be a mini-pork barrel.''

The pool of energy efficiency funds could grow again next year when the state carves up the estimated $200 million that power producers are expected to pay for carbon credits.

Con Edison and city officials have also argued that New Yorkers deserve a greater slice of the energy efficiency pie. Nyserda, they say, has not done a good enough job to help New Yorkers get its rebates and loans, which are disbursed on a first-come-first-served basis; they note that the agency has 14 people working out of a single office in the city. A spokesman for Nyserda said that the staff had grown from nine last year and would be up to 18 next year.

In June, the Public Service Commission also agreed to give the state's utility companies, including Con Edison, direct control of about half the money raised by the increase in SBC fees, with each expected to finance energy-efficiency projects in their own areas. And Con Ed's chief executive was recently appointed to the Nyserda board.

Tom Lynch, a spokesman for the agency, said that where SBC dollars are spent was less important than the overall effects of increasing energy efficiency. If businesses in, say, Rochester, save a megawatt of electricity, then that megawatt is free to be sent to New York City.

''Plus, when you reduce electricity usage through energy efficiency,'' he said, ''you take off some of the marginal, dirtier power plants, so you're cleaning up the air at the same time.''
URL: http://www.nytimes.com
SUBJECT: ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION & DISTRIBUTION (90%); NATURAL GAS & ELECTRIC UTILITIES (90%); ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS (90%); ENERGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS (90%); ENERGY EFFICIENCY & CONSERVATION (78%); NATURAL GAS PRODUCTS (78%); POWER FAILURES (78%); SPORTS & RECREATION FACILITIES & VENUES (76%); SOFT DRINK INDUSTRY (76%); ENGINEERING (76%); ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT (76%); ENERGY RESEARCH (76%); ANNUAL REPORTS (76%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (72%); RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT (72%); ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES (69%); MARKETING & ADVERTISING EXPENDITURE (67%); MANUFACTURING FACILITIES (64%); MARKETING CAMPAIGNS (63%); OFFICE PROPERTY (60%); MARKETING & ADVERTISING (50%)
COMPANY: CONSOLIDATED EDISON INC (58%); NATIONAL GRID PLC (90%); NEW YORK STATE ENERGY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY (67%); PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING OF PETERSBURG (52%); PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING / TWIN FALLS (52%)
TICKER: ED (NYSE) (58%); NGG (NYSE) (90%); NG (LSE) (90%)
INDUSTRY: NAICS221210 NATURAL GAS DISTRIBUTION (91%); NAICS221122 ELECTRIC POWER DISTRIBUTION (91%); SIC4924 NATURAL GAS DISTRIBUTION (91%); SIC4911 ELECTRIC SERVICES (91%)
GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (94%); ALBANY, NY, USA (90%) NEW YORK, USA (95%) UNITED STATES (95%)
LOAD-DATE: December 29, 2008
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
GRAPHIC: PHOTO: Money from a state agency helped Scott Soule install new compressors and lighting systems at his ice rink near Binghamton, N.Y., drastically cutting energy bills. (PHOTOGRAPH BY BILL WINGELL FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES)(A19) CHART: Reducing Demand: Since 1998, a fee on most electric bills has been used to give loans and rebates to electricity customers of all sizes to increase efficiency and reduce demand. Some examples: (Source: Nyserda)(A19)

Exploring the Electricity Bill: A portion of electricity bills in New York State goes to energy-conserving projects. The System Benefits Charge, about a dollar on the average bill in New York City, has been around since 1998.(Source: Public Service Commission

Nyserda)(A23)
PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company



8 of 1231 DOCUMENTS

The New York Times
December 29, 2008 Monday

Late Edition - Final


Paid Notice: Deaths GREENWALD, JANE
SECTION: Section B; Column 0; Classified; Pg. 08
LENGTH: 139 words
GREENWALD--Jane, 80, formerly of Hewlett, NY, died December 28. She was a true woman of her time. She was married to the late Phil Greenwald and was a loving homemaker, raising six children through the late 1960s; at which point she became a champion of women's rights and an early opponent of the Vietnam War. In the 1970s, she was seized by the entrepreneurial spirit and founded an advertising agency, which she ran successfully for a decade. Afterwards, she traveled the world, settling for a time in Vancouver, BC. In her late years, she returned to New York City to be with her family. She is survived by her children, Jonathan, Susan, Judson, Jennifer, Joseph, and Abraham; 14 grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. Funeral Services will be held Tuesday, December 30 at Boulevard Riverside Chapels, 1450 Broadway, Hewlett, NY.
URL: http://www.nytimes.com
SUBJECT: DEATHS & OBITUARIES (92%); WOMEN (88%); ENTREPRENEURSHIP (69%); VIETNAM WAR (55%); MARKETING & ADVERTISING (54%)
GEOGRAPHIC: VANCOUVER, BC, CANADA (53%); NEW YORK, NY, USA (52%) NEW YORK, USA (78%); BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA (53%) UNITED STATES (78%); CANADA (53%)
LOAD-DATE: December 29, 2008
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
DOCUMENT-TYPE: Paid Death Notice
PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company



9 of 1231 DOCUMENTS

The New York Times
December 28, 2008 Sunday

Late Edition - Final


PAPERBACK BEST SELLERS: FICTION: TRADE: Sunday, December 28th 2008
SECTION: Section BR; Column 0; Book Review Desk; Pg. 20
LENGTH: 666 words
Rankings reflect sales, for the week ended Dec. 13, at many thousands of venues where a wide range of general interest books are sold nationwide. These include hundreds of independent book retailers (statistically weighted to represent all such outlets); national, regional and local chains; online and multimedia entertainment retailers; university, gift, supermarket, discount and department stores; and newsstands. An asterisk (*) indicates that a book’s sales are barely distinguishable from those of the book above. A dagger (†) indicates that some bookstores report receiving bulk orders. Among those categories not actively tracked are: perennial sellers; required classroom reading; text, reference and test preparation guides; journals and workbooks; calorie counters; shopping guides; comics; and crossword puzzles. Expanded rankings are available on the Web: nytimes.com/books.












Weeks




This

On




Week

List

PAPERBACK BEST SELLERS: FICTION: TRADE








1

30

THE SHACK, by William P. Young. (Windblown Media, $14.99.) A man whose daughter was abducted is invited to an isolated shack, apparently by God. (†)








2

3

A THOUSAND SPLENDID SUNS, by Khaled Hosseini. (Riverhead, $16.) A friendship between two women in Afghanistan against the backdrop of 30 years of war.








3

4

THE APPEAL, by John Grisham. (Delta, $14.) Political and legal intrigue ensue when a Mississippi court rules against a company accused of dumping toxic waste.








4

2

CHANGE OF HEART, by Jodi Picoult. (Washington Square, $16.) A prisoner on death row begins performing miracles.








5

10

WORLD WITHOUT END, by Ken Follett. (New American Library, $22.) Love and intrigue in Kingsbridge, the medieval English cathedral town at the center of Follett’s “Pillars of the Earth.”








6

15

THE BRIEF WONDROUS LIFE OF OSCAR WAO, by Junot Daz. (Riverhead, $14.) A nerdy Dominican-American struggles to escape a family curse.








7

3

HALO: THE COLE PROTOCOL, by Tobias S. Buckell. (Doherty, $14.95.) Navy Lt. Jacob Keyes is sent on a secret mission to a far corner of the universe.








8

66

THE ALCHEMIST, by Paulo Coelho. (HarperOne, $13.95.) A Spanish shepherd boy travels to Egypt in search of treasure.








9

43

THE FRIDAY NIGHT KNITTING CLUB, by Kate Jacobs. (Berkley, $14.) A group of women meet weekly at a New York City yarn shop.








10

67

WATER FOR ELEPHANTS, by Sara Gruen. (Algonquin, $13.95.) A young man — and an elephant — save a Depression-era circus.








11

66

THE KITE RUNNER, by Khaled Hosseini. (Riverhead, $15.95 and $14.) An Afghan-American returns to Kabul to learn how a childhood friend has fared.








12*

9

THE WHITE TIGER, by Aravind Adiga. (Free Press, $14.) A chauffeur in India relates the story of his transformation from manservant to entrepreneur to murderer; the winner of the 2008 Man Booker Prize.








13

2

THE READER, by Bernhard Schlink. (Vintage, $13.95.) A German high school student falls in love with a former Auschwitz employee.








14

35

LOVING FRANK, by Nancy Horan. (Ballantine, $14.) A story of the romance between Frank Lloyd Wright and Mamah Borthwick Cheney.








15*

6

REMEMBER ME?, by Sophie Kinsella. (Dial, $14.) After an auto accident, a London woman loses her memory.








16

2

REVOLUTIONARY ROAD, by Richard Yates. (Vintage, $14.95.) Frank and April Wheeler, a beautiful young couple living in 1950s America, see their supposedly perfect life come undone.








17

1

SHADOW COUNTRY, by Peter Matthiessen. (Modern Library, $16.) An epic reimagining of the life of Edgar J. Watson, Florida pioneer and rumored killer of Belle Starr; the winner of the 2008 National Book Award.








18

26

THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES, by Sue Monk Kidd. (Penguin, $15 and $14.) In South Carolina in 1964, a teenage girl tries to discover the secret to her mother’s past.








19

2

THE ELEGANCE OF THE HEDGEHOG, by Muriel Barbery. (Europa, $15.) A young girl and a widowed concierge, both closet intellectuals, become friends.








20

18

IN THE WOODS, by Tana French. (Penguin, $14.) An Irish detective investigating the murder of a 12-year-old girl returns to the scene of his own terrible ordeal.










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