Bluegrass community and technical college



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BLUEGRASS COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

English 102—Writing II Section

Room 118 ACHS M/W or T/R 2-3:10


Instructor: Allison Williams

Office: Room 118 ACHS

Phone: x2118

Email: leslie.williams@anderson.kyschools.us


Humanities Division Offices: AT 101

Division Phone: (859) 246-6367 or EXT: 56367

Division FAX: (859) 246-4670

English Coordinator: Robin Haggerty

Office: Cooper AT 202

Phone: (859) 246-6699

Email: robin.haggerty@kctcs.edu



Humanities Assistant Dean: Angie King

Office: Cooper AT101 J

Phone: (859) 246-6696



Course Description

Emphasizes argumentative writing. Provides further instruction in drafting and systematically revising essays that express ideas in Standard English. Includes continued instruction and practice in reading critically, thinking logically, responding to texts, addressing specific audiences, and researching and documenting credible academic sources. NOTE:  Credit is not available by special examination.  ENG 101 and ENG 102 may not be taken concurrently. Prerequisite:  ENG 101. 


Textbook (Standard)

Faigley and Selzer. Good Reasons with Contemporary Arguments, 6th ed. (required)


Supplies

Loose-leaf paper and/or spiral notebook, something to write with (pen and highlighter), a college-level dictionary, folder/binder with tab dividers, and a flash drive or Google docs account.
Access to a computer (at home, school, and/or local library) is required.
Method of Instruction

In English 102, you will develop critical reading and argumentative writing skills through the process of refining early drafts into improved final form.  This course uses lectures, discussions, reading and writing assignments, and peer reviews. This course provides instruction in APA style.


General Education Competencies and Student Learning Outcomes

English 102 will address the following general education competencies and student learning outcomes:


Students should prepare for the twenty-first century by gaining:

A. Knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural worlds through study in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts

General Education Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Write clear and effective prose in several forms, using conventions appropriate to audience (including academic audiences), purpose, and genre.


B. Intellectual and practical skills, including inquiry and analysis, critical and creative thinking, written and oral communication, quantitative literacy, information literacy, teamwork and problem solving

General Education Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Listen and speak competently in a variety of communication contexts, which may include public, interpersonal, and/or small-group settings.

  • Write clear and effective prose in several forms, using conventions appropriate to audience (including academic audiences), purpose, and genre.

  • Find, analyze, evaluate, and cite pertinent primary and secondary sources, including academic databases, to prepare speeches and written texts.

  • Identify, analyze, and evaluate statements, assumptions, and conclusions representing diverse points of view, construct informed, sustained, and ethical arguments in response.

  • Plan, organize, revise, practice, edit, and proofread to improve the development and clarity of ideas.



C. Personal and social responsibility, including civic knowledge and engagement (local and global), intercultural knowledge and competence, ethical reasoning and action, foundations and skills for lifelong learning

General Education Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Listen and speak competently in a variety of communication contexts, which may include public, interpersonal, and/or small-group settings.

  • Write clear and effective prose in several forms, using conventions appropriate to audience (including academic audiences), purpose, and genre.

  • Identify, analyze, and evaluate statements, assumptions, and conclusions representing diverse points of view, construct informed, sustained, and ethical arguments in response.


D. Integrative and applied learning, including synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized skills

General Education Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Listen and speak competently in a variety of communication contexts, which may include public, interpersonal, and/or small-group settings.

  • Write clear and effective prose in several forms, using conventions appropriate to audience (including academic audiences), purpose, and genre.

  • Find, analyze, evaluate, and cite pertinent primary and secondary sources, including academic databases, to prepare speeches and written texts.

  • Identify, analyze, and evaluate statements, assumptions, and conclusions representing diverse points of view, construct informed, sustained, and ethical arguments in response.

  • Plan, organize, revise, practice, edit, and proofread to improve the development and clarity of ideas.

Assignments and Grading

It is expected that students will complete assignment prior to class.
****** ALL ESSAYS MUST BE COMPLETED TO RECEIVE CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE. FAILURE TO COMPLETE ONE ESSAY WILL LEAD TO A FAILING GRADE OF E. ******
Participation                                                             10%

APA Introduction                                                       10 %

Rhetorical Analysis (one source, MLA or APA)        15%

Rebuttal Argument (multiple sources, APA)        20%

Definition Argument (multiple sources, APA)    20%

Causal Argument (multiple sources, APA)          25%



Grading Scale

100-90 = A; 89-80=B; 79-70=C; 69-60=D; Below 60=E.


SAP Statement

Withdrawing (W) or failing this class (grade E) may affect your future financial aid eligibility if you receive grants and/or loans to pay for it. You should review the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) policy for additional information. Contact the Financial Aid Office for a copy of the SAP policy.


All students are expected to attend class and have the required textbook(s) even if you have not received your financial aid or if you have an appeal in process. Further information about the SAP policy is located at http://bluegrass.kctcs.edu/en/financial_aid/satisfactory_academic_progress.aspx.
Essay One Revision:

A key element of successful essays is the application of critical revision. It is expected that any final draft that you submit for grading has already been carefully proofread, revised, and edited.

To ensure that you grasp the importance of the revision process, you will be permitted to further revise Essay #1 after I have graded it. The final grade for this revision will be an average of the initial grade and the subsequent revision grade (For example: Original - 75, Revision - 85. Final Grade: = 80).

Revisions will not be accepted unless:



  • The original graded essay and rubric is turned in with it

  • They are submitted together in a manila envelope

  • The manila envelope indicates your name, teacher name, and REVISION

  • They are submitted by the deadline of March 9th (M/W class) or March 10th (T/R class) .


Final Exam:

There is no final exam in this course. Instead, you will have a test on Latin vocabulary roots and a test on grammar skills which count as part of your participation grade.

Class Participation Policy

Attendance is required. Please note that participation accounts for 10 % of your grade (See Assignments and Grading). The emphasis of this grade is on class participation. Absence is NOT an excuse for lack of preparation for the next class. All assignments are still due on time. If you miss class for emergency or certified illness with doctor's note, you must contact the instructor to obtain the assignment, or make arrangements with someone to bring in a due assignment.
The participation grade is drawn directly from class participation/attendance, homework, vocabulary root test and grammar test. All students are allowed three un-penalized absences. Each subsequent absence results in a 5 point deduction from the overall participation grade.
Make-Up Work and Late Work Policy

I reserve the right to refuse late work. Students are expected to turn in all work on time. If you anticipate a problem, make arrangements with me before the work is due. Assigned work is to be turned in at the beginning of each class. Anything turned in after that time will be considered a late submission. If you email me a paper the night before it is due because you have printer problems, etc., you MUST receive an email back from me that I received your paper. Merely sending it to me (since there could be errors with access to a corrupt attached file, failure to attach the file in the first place, etc.) will not count as an on-time submission.
Essays turned in late will only be accepted up to one class period after the original due date, and they will be penalized 5 % points for lateness. In the event that an unexpected absence occurs (such as serious illness), email the essay as an attachment to my email account before 2pm on the day the class meets.
Withdrawal Policy

Withdrawing from the course before midterm does not require the instructor's permission. After midterm, the instructor's permission is required, but is given at the instructor’s discretion. To obtain the necessary signature, a student should take the official form to the instructor before the last day of that class. Generally, the best time to contact an instructor is just before or just after the scheduled class meets. In all cases, the responsibility for withdrawing from the course is the student's. The instructor is not allowed to assign a "W" grade unless you officially request it. Students who simply stop attending the class will receive an "E" grade (failing).
Plagiarized Work

Plagiarism is the act of presenting ideas, words, or organization of a source, published or not, as if they were one's own. All quoted material must be in quotation marks, and all paraphrases, quotations, significant ideas, and organization must be acknowledged by some form of documentation acceptable to the instructor for the course.


Plagiarism also includes the practice of employing or allowing another person to alter or revise the work that a student submits as the student’s own. Students may discuss assignments among themselves or with an instructor or tutor, but when the actual material is completed, it must be done by the student and the student alone. The use of the term “material” refers to work in any form including written, oral, and electronic.
All academic work, written or otherwise, submitted by a student to an instructor or other academic supervisor, is expected to be the result of the student’s own thought, research, or self-expression. In any case in which a student feels unsure about a question of plagiarism involving the student’s work, the student must consult the instructor before submitting the work.
Students who plagiarize will receive the following sanctions:

Faculty Academic Sanctions (pertaining to sections 2.3.1.1 to 2.3.1.3 Student Handbook)

For instances of academic dishonesty related to earning grades (violations 2.3.1.1 – 2.3.1.3), the instructor may implement any of three sanctions:




  • a failing grade for the specific assignment; and/or

  • a reduced grade for the course; and/or

  • a failing grade for the course. [automatic grade E]

If an instructor chooses the sanction which assigns a failing grade [E] for the course, the instructor shall notify the division chair, the chief executive officer or designee, and the registrar. For more information about the role of college personnel in the process, refer to section 2.5.2. (student handbook).



Student Rights and Responsibilities:


All rules and regulations set forth in the current edition of the KCTCS Code of Student Conduct will be followed in this course. The KCTCS Code of Student Conduct is available online at: http://www.kctcs.edu/Students.aspx
Weather/Emergency Closing Information:

During any inclement weather or other emergency, it is the policy of BCTC to keep all offices open and classes in session as scheduled if possible and practical. If a decision on cancellation or delay of college operations is necessary, the college president will consult with college leadership. The Public Information and Marketing office will update information for the media and the college community.



Please take note of the following:
BCTC closures will be implemented on a campus-by-campus basis depending on the conditions in each city or class location. If classes at a site are canceled, that particular campus will be closed. If a delay is necessary, that campus will open at 9:30 a.m. Employees will report at the start time for classes, and services will begin at that time. If classes are canceled for the day, night classes are also canceled.


The weather/emergency closing policy is available online at: http://bluegrass.kctcs.edu/news_and_events/closings_and_delays

If ACHS has a snow day but BCTC Lawrenceburg Campus is still operational, you MUST consult my webpage and complete the assignment found there. The day’s assignment will be posted by 9am on that day and must be submitted at the next class meeting.


Reasonable Accommodation


Students with disabilities who require accommodations (academic adjustments and/or auxiliary aids or services) for this course must contact a staff member in BCTC’s Disability Support Services (DSS) office.  The DSS phone number is 1-866-774-4872 extension 56758.  Please do not request accommodations directly from the professor or instructor. 
Tentative Schedule
Weeks 1-5 Reading and Discovering Arguments & Analyzing Arguments

Complete Diagnostic MLA test

Introduce APA Style

Review chapter 21 (GR)—cover basics of APA style

Read chapters 1-3 (GR)

Read selection/s from Part 6, "Contemporary Arguments" (GR)

Various other assigned selections and assignments

Grammar work



Complete Essay #1 (Rhetorical Analysis – Textual Analysis: one source: MLA format)

Help with grammar, syntax and mechanics

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/

Citation systems
http://www.bluegrass.kctcs.edu/en/Library/Citations.aspx

Review APA (videos and online sources)

Video instructions:



https://youtu.be/pdAfIqRt60c?list=PL8F43A67F38DE3D5D

https://youtu.be/HpAOi8-WUY4?list=PL8F43A67F38DE3D5D

Website resources:



https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/
Week 6-8 Writing Arguments-Rebuttal Argument

Read chapter 12, "Rebuttal Arguments" (GR)

Read chapter 4, "Drafting and Revising Arguments” (GR)

Read chapters 16-18 and 21 (GR)– research, using sources, and APA

Review APA style

Read selection/s from Part 6, "Contemporary Arguments" (GR)

Various other assigned selections and assignments

Grammar work



Complete Essay #2 (Rebuttal Argument: multiple sources: APA format)
Weeks 9-12 Writing Arguments-Definition Argument

Read chapter 8, “Definition Arguments” (GR)

Review chapter 4, "Drafting and Revising Arguments” (GR)

Review chapters 16-18 and 21 (GR)—research, using sources and APA

Review APA style

Read selection/s from Part 6, "Contemporary Arguments" (GR)

Various other assigned selections and assignments

Grammar work



Complete Essay #3 (Definition Argument: multiple sources: APA format)
Weeks 13-16 Writing Arguments-Causal Argument

Read chapter 9, "Causal Arguments" (GR)

Review chapter 4, "Drafting and Revising Arguments” (GR)

Read selection/s from Part 6, "Contemporary Arguments" (GR)

Review chapters 16-18 and 21 (GR)—research, using sources and APA

Review APA style


Various other assigned selections and assignments

Grammar work



Complete Essay #4 (Causal Argument: multiple sources: APA format)
Vocabulary Root Test
Grammar Test


Bluegrass Community and Technical College is an Equal Opportunity Institution.

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