Ba in film with television studies



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Third Year:


Autumn Term

Week 2, Monday

Review of Literature and draft structure submitted to supervisor



Second Supervisory Meeting
Week 4, Thursday

23/10/14, 9.00-12.00. Workshop on presentation skills, Catherine Constable, A1.27.


Week 5, Thursday

30/10/14, 9.00-12.00. Workshop on presentation skills, Catherine Constable, A 1.27.


Week 7, Monday

Draft chapter submitted to supervisor. Discuss any issues arising with the forthcoming presentation.



Third Supervisory Meeting
Week 8, Thursday

20/11/14 9.00-13.00. Symposium: students to give 10 minute presentations on their research topics and progress to date in A1.27.


Week 9, Monday

Arrange to meet your supervisor to discuss issues arising from the presentation and gain an overview of your term’s progress.



Fourth Supervisory Meeting
Spring Term

Week 3

Second draft chapter submitted to supervisor



Fifth Supervisory Meeting
Week 7, Monday

12.00 noon: Dissertation Submission Deadline. (For all details concerning required presentation see Appendix 4 in this Handbook.)


Week 10, Friday

Dissertation marks returned


ASSESSMENT
The Assessment System: conventions and procedures

Throughout your studies, you are assessed through a combination of essays and unseen examinations, which take place at the end of each year. The marks obtained in the first year will not count towards your final degree classification, but 2nd year marks constitute 50% of the assessment which your degree result is derived from. The scale of marks equivalent to classification is as follows:

70 and above First

60-69 2.1

50-59 2.2

40-49 3rd



39 and below Fail
The Final Year Examination Board uses examination conventions for the award of degree classifications. These conventions are not confidential and apply to all students in the Faculties of Arts and Social Sciences, (but not those in the Institute of Education). They are available on the website:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/quality/categories/examinations/markscalesconventions/forstudents/

17-point marking scale

Where an assessment or exam is a single piece of work, or a small number of long exam answers, 1st and 2nd year work will be marked using the 17-point marking scale outlined below.
(The descriptors in the following table are interpreted as appropriate to the subject and the year/level of study, and implicitly cover good academic practice and the avoidance of plagiarism. We publish more detailed departmental marking criteria in Appendix 4.)
With the exception of Zero, the descriptors cover a range of marks, with the location within each group dependent on the extent to which the elements in the descriptor and departmental marking criteria are met.



Class

Scale

Descriptor

First

Excellent 1st

Exceptional work of the highest quality, demonstrating excellent knowledge and understanding, analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills. At final-year level: work may achieve or be close to publishable standard.

High 1st

Very high quality work demonstrating excellent knowledge and understanding, analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills. Work which may extend existing debates or interpretations.

Mid 1st

Low 1st

Upper Second (2.1)

High 2.1

High quality work demonstrating good knowledge and understanding, analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills.

Mid 2.1

Low 2.1

Lower Second

High 2.2

Competent work, demonstrating reasonable knowledge and understanding, some analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills.

Mid 2.2

Low 2.2

Third

High 3rd

Work of limited quality, demonstrating some relevant knowledge and understanding.

Mid 3rd

Low 3rd

Fail

High Fail (sub Honours)

Work does not meet standards required for the appropriate stage of an Honours degree. There may be evidence of some basic understanding of relevant concepts and techniques

Fail

Poor quality work well below the standards required for the appropriate stage of an Honours degree.

Low Fail

Zero

Zero

Work of no merit OR Absent, work not submitted, penalty in some misconduct cases

For calculating module results, the points on this marking scale have the following numerical equivalents:




Class

Point on scale

numerical equivalent

range of marks for work marked using all points on 0-100 scale

First

Excellent 1st

96

93-100

High 1st

89

85-92

Mid 1st

81

78-84

Low 1st

74

70-77

Upper Second

High 2.1

68

67-69

Mid 2.1

65

64-66

Low 2.1

62

60-63

Lower Second

High 2.2

58

57-59

Mid 2.2

55

54-56

Low 2.2

52

50-53

Third

High 3rd

48

47-49

Mid 3rd

45

44-46

Low 3rd

42

40-43

Fail

High Fail

38

35-39

Fail

25

19-34

Low Fail

12

1-18

Zero

Zero

0



So, if an essay or exam answer is awarded the grade ‘Mid 2.1’ this means that it will count as a numerical mark of 65 for the purpose of calculating your final grade for the relevant module.


Further information about examinations may be obtained from your module tutors, your personal tutor, or the department’s Examinations Secretary, José Arroyo.
The Second Year Examination board meets at the end of the summer term. It consists of the Head of Department, the Examinations Secretary and all second year module leaders. Its main function is to ratify marks and to confirm which students can straightforwardly proceed to their final year of study; it will also make specific recommendations if conditions for procession to the final year have not been met (i.e. if modules have been failed). Your personal tutor will be able to give you a full breakdown of your marks following the board. If you are not able to be present but would like to be sent your overall module grades, please give Tracey McVey a self-addressed envelope and remember to see your personal tutor at the beginning of your third year to discuss your results. Do not request marks by email or telephone.
Examinations test your understanding of critical and theoretical issues and your coverage of the syllabus, as well as your ability to write concisely and at short notice (see appendix 3 guidelines on preparation for and writing under examination conditions). Assessed essays give you the opportunity to display your command of close textual analysis and historical research, and your ability to collect and organise evidence. They develop your analytic, rhetorical and writing skills (see appendix 2 guidelines for the writing of essays). They also allow you to learn from comments and corrections by tutors.
You may not repeat material from your assessed essays in any examinations, (though you may repeat material from unassessed or formative essays). If in doubt about this, consult module tutors or your personal tutor.
Essays will normally be returned to you within four weeks (20 university working days), with an agreed internal grade, and detailed comments from the first marker who, as your module tutor, is in the best position to make them. The role of the second marker is to monitor the standards of marking (rather than offer a second set of comments) and to resolve the internal grade. The internal grade may be adjusted later by the external examiners. Even though it may be subject to revision, it is felt to be appropriate to give you the agreed internal mark and feedback before it is confirmed by the externals, (this is also past students’ preference). Significant adjustments, though they can happen, are very rare.
You will find in appendix 5 guidelines for the assessment criteria in operation in the department.
All 2nd year modules are examined at the end of the year. The weightings given to essay and exam work for film and television modules in the second year is as follows:
BA in Film and Literature and BA in Film with Television Studies
Hollywood Cinema

Assessment: 2 x 3,000 word essays 60%

Examination: 2 questions in 2 hours 40%

National Cinemas

Assessment: 2 x 3,000 word essays 60%

Examination: 2 questions in 2 hours 40%


Television History and Criticism

Formative assessment: 1 x 1,000 word essay 0%

Assessment: 2 x 3,000 word essays 60%

Examination: 2 questions in 2 hours 40%

Silent Cinema

Assessment: 2 x 3,000 word essays 60%

Examination: 2 questions in 2 hours 40%


Audio-Visual Avant Gardes (30 CAT)

Assessment: 1 x 2,500 word essay 25%

Portfolio 25%

Examination: 3 hours 50%


Audio-Visual Avant Gardes (15 CAT)

Assessment: 1 x 2,500 word essay 50%

Examination: 1½ hours 50%


Essay Lengths

You must provide a word count at the end of your essay. 10% variation on the required length, in either direction, is acceptable.


Essay Titles

Essay titles will be published at least 4 weeks before the essay deadline.


Essay Deadlines and Submission

All essays should be handed in by 12 noon on the day stated below; Film essays to the Film and Television Studies departmental secretary (room A0.12), Literature essays to the English department (Reception 5th Floor of Humanities Building), and Audio-Visual Avant Garde essays to the Theatre and Performance Studies department (G.29 of Millburn House). Cover sheets for literature modules are available from the English department. Please see English Department guidelines regarding hard copy and e-submission of assessed work:


http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/currentstudents/undergraduate/essay
All essays for Film and Television modules must be submitted in BOTH hard copy AND electronic form. The electronic version of your essay must be submitted though Tabula at Start.Warwick:
https://start.warwick.ac.uk
The deadline for electronic submission is exactly the same as for the hard copy: 12.00pm on the day stated below. Full instructions on how to upload your essay are provided on the department’s e-submission web-page. Please remember your essay will not be considered to have been submitted until you have handed in your hard copy AND uploaded your essay via the e-submission system. Failure to do either by the specified deadline will mean that your essay is LATE and you will be subject to the appropriate penalties (see p.31).
No essays for any department can be submitted by fax or email.
All hard copies of essays should be accompanied by a securely attached and fully completed front sheet (see appendix 7). Copies of the sheet are available from the departmental office, and should be collected in advance – not filled in when you arrive to submit the essay. Mark and comment sheets will be attached to essays when they are returned. These will be available for collection from the departmental office.



You must hand in two hard copies of all Film and Television Studies essays; the cover sheet only asks for your student number so that the essay will be marked anonymously if you wish. You will need to check with other departments whether they require two copies and anonymity. Normally students hand their essays in personally. If for any reason it is not possible to hand in the work in person, you are advised not to leave the submission to the last minute, and to ask the student entrusted with the task to phone you to confirm that the essay has been signed in. But it should be clear that you are taking the risk of an arrangement going wrong. Retrospective extensions are not given where the essay has been handed to a third party and has gone astray.
N.B. When it comes to deadlines which fall in the first week of the Christmas or Easter vacations, if you are not able to submit your essay in person you may hand it in before the end of term (but check ahead that there will be someone available in the office if you plan to submit it on a Friday) or send it by first class signed for mail. If you do submit an essay due in week 11 by mail, it must arrive by 12.00pm on the deadline day.


Essay Extensions


If there are circumstances which prevent your handing in an essay by the prescribed deadline, you will have to apply for an extension. The conventions which apply depend on the department teaching the module, and are as follows.
For Film Studies modules: the only person who can grant extensions is the Senior Tutor. You will need to fill in an extension request form on Tabula through Start.Warwick. If the extension is agreed, you will be provided with a new deadline.
Extensions are given in the case of significant illness, accompanied by a medical note, or severely challenging personal circumstances. They are not given to cover transport difficulties, poor time management or mistaking or forgetting the time of deadlines. They are not normally given for computer failure unless fully documented. Involvement in extra-curricular university activities is never grounds for an extension if you could reasonably have planned ahead and allotted your time accordingly.
You may wish to use email to alert your module tutor and/or the Senior Tutor if you are aware in advance that circumstances are arising which may cause you to require an extension. You will still need to fill in an extension request form on Tabula.
For English modules: Extension requests should be submitted to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Dr Peter Mack in Term One, Dr Pablo Mukherjee in Terms Two and Three).
In some circumstances in which you have not been granted an extension you may still be advised to complete the assignment and hand it in. In these cases the work will be marked and the mark reported to the appropriate examination board. The board will consider how, if at all, the mark is to be taken into account.
(The second year board of examiners may choose to leave the final decision in such cases to the end of your third year).

Penalties for Late Submission without an Extension


When work is submitted late and no formal extension has been granted, there is a penalty reduction of the mark by 5 percentage points for each (working) day late.

2ND YEAR ESSAY DEADLINES
TERM ONE

2014 Return date

Monday 27th October (Wk 5) TV Hist & Crit (formative) 1,000 words 24th November

Monday 10th November (Wk 7) National Cinemas 3,000 words 8th December

Monday 17th November (Wk 8) Hollywood Cinema 3,000 words 15th December

Tuesday 25th November (Wk 9) AVAG (15 CAT; 30 CAT option) 2,500 words 23rd December

Friday 5th December (Wk 10) TV Hist & Criticism 3,000 words 7th January



TERM TWO

2015 Return date

Monday 19th January (Wk 3) Silent Cinema 3,000 words 16th February

Monday 16th February (Wk 7) National Cinemas 3,000 words 16th March

Monday 9th March (Wk 10) AVAG (15 and 30 CAT) Portfolio 8th April


TERM THREE

2015 Return date

Monday 20th April (Wk 1) Hollywood Cinema 3,000 words 19th May

Thursday 23rd April (Wk 1) AVAG (30 CAT option only) 2,500 words 22nd May

Monday 27th April (Wk 2) TV Hist and Criticism 3,000 words 27th May

Tuesday 5th May (Wk 3) Silent Cinema 3,000 words 3rd June


Examination information

The syllabus on which examinations are based will be made clear to you in the revision sessions in the summer term. If in doubt, please consult module tutors in the first place, or your personal tutor.


Copies of past examination papers (from the last five years) are available online at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/exampapers
Exam rubrics are posted on the notice board in A1.23 in the summer term and will be explained by module tutors in revision sessions.
Second year examinations often begin in week 7 or 8 of the summer term, but exam timetabling arrangements are not made by the department and cannot be guaranteed.

CURRICULUM YEAR 3
BA IN FILM AND LITERATURE - 3rd year modules for 2014-2015

(For assessment, see section below)


Students are required to take one core film module, one core literature option and film or literature options worth 60 CATS.
You will have received advance information on your modules. Detailed programmes and reading lists will be handed out by module tutors at the first session.



Core Module
FI301 Film Aesthetics

Module tutors: José Arroyo with Owen Weetch (Autumn & Spring)

2 screenings per week

1 lecture per week

1 seminar per week

Assessment = 1 x 5,000 word essay (60%) AND 2 hour exam (40%)




BA IN FILM STUDIES – 3rd year modules for 2014-2015

Students are required to take one core module (30 CATs) and 90 CATs worth of option modules selected at the end of the second year.


You will have received advance information on your modules. Detailed programmes and reading lists will be handed out by module tutors at the first session.
Core Module
FI301 Film Aesthetics

Module tutors: José Arroyo with Owen Weetch (Autumn & Spring)

1 screening per week

1 lecture per week

1 seminar per week

Assessment = 1 x 5,000 word essay (60%) AND 2 hour exam (40%)



Optional 3rd Year Modules (Film & Television Studies) in 2014-2015 for BOTH degrees

FI321 Contemporary Spanish Cinema: Pedro Almodóvar: 15 CATs (Autumn Term)

Module tutor: José Arroyo

2 screenings per week

1 lecture per week

1 seminar per week

Assessment = 1 x 5,000 word essay OR 2 hour exam


FI322 70s Hollywood Cinema: 15 CATs (Autumn Term)

Module Tutor: Karl Schoonover

2 screenings per week

1 lecture per week

1 seminar per week

Assessment = 1 x 5,000 word essay OR 2 hour exam


FI314 Postmodernism and New Hollywood: 15 CATs (Autumn Term)

Module tutor: Catherine Constable

1 screening per week

1 lecture per week

1 seminar per week

Assessment = 1 x 5,000 word essay OR 2 hour exam


FI326 Issues in Documentary (Re-enactment): 15 CATS (Autumn Term)

Module tutor: Stella Bruzzi

1 screening per week

1 lecture per week

1 seminar per week

Assessment = 1 x 5,000 word essay


FI318 British Film & Television Fiction: 15 CATs (Spring Term)

Module tutor: Charlotte Brunsdon

1-2 screenings per week

1 lecture per week

1 seminar per week

Assessment = 1 x 5,000 word essay


FI325 Horror and the Gothic in Film and Television: 15 CATS (Spring Term)

Module tutor: Helen Wheatley

1-2 screenings per week

1 lecture per week

1 seminar per week

Assessment = 1 x 5,000 word essay


FI324 Hollywood Romantic Comedy: 15 CATS (Spring Term)

Module tutor: James MacDowell

1 screening per week

1 lecture per week

1 seminar per week

Assessment = 1 x 5,000 word essay OR 2 hour exam


FI315 Swedish Cinema: 15 CATS (Spring Term)

Module tutor: Ed Gallafent

1 screening per week

1 lecture per week

1 seminar per week

Assessment = 1 x 5,000 word essay OR 2 hour exam



FI205 TV History and Criticism: 30 CATS

Module tutors: Rachel Moseley (Autumn), Lauren Thompson (Spring)

2 screenings per week

1 lecture per week (1 hour)

1 seminar per week (1 hour)

Assessment = 1 x 5,000 word essay (50%) AND 2 hour exam (50%)


FI310 Dissertation (30 CATs)

Those who are writing a dissertation this year should note the timetable below:


Autumn Term

Week 2, Monday

Review of Literature and draft structure submitted to supervisor



Second Supervisory Meeting
Week 4, Thursday

23/10/14, 9.00-12.00. Workshop on presentation skills, Catherine Constable, A1.27.


Week 5, Thursday

30/10/14, 9.00-12.00. Workshop on presentation skills, Catherine Constable, A 1.27.


Week 7, Monday

Draft chapter submitted to supervisor. Discuss any issues arising with the forthcoming presentation.



Third Supervisory Meeting
Week 8, Thursday

20/11/14 9.00-13.00. Symposium: students to give 10 minute presentations on their research topics and progress to date in A1.27.


Week 9, Monday

Arrange to meet your supervisor to discuss issues arising from the presentation and gain an overview of your term’s progress.



Fourth Supervisory Meeting
Spring Term

Week 3

Second draft chapter submitted to supervisor



Fifth Supervisory Meeting
Week 7, Monday

12.00 noon: Dissertation Submission Deadline. (For all details concerning required presentation see Appendix 4 in this Handbook.)


Week 10, Friday

Dissertation marks returned

For options outside the department, please refer to module documentation for details of teaching schedule and assessment.
Postgraduate Study and Further Courses

If you are thinking of postgraduate STUDY you should talk this over with your personal tutor in the autumn term. Selecting an appropriate course takes time and care. Courses and programmes are advertised on the general noticeboard in the Common Room. If you are interested in continuing your studies here at Warwick, make an appointment with our MA admissions tutor Karl Schoonover who can advise you. In addition information about our MA programme can be found on the departmental website at:


http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/film/postgrads/ma/
A complete list of courses in Britain may be found (under ‘courses’) in the British Film Institute Film and Television Handbook in the library. Some programmes have application deadlines early in the New Year. It is normally expected that you will have an MA before you can be considered for a PhD programme. A presentation on postgraduate opportunities in Film and Television Studies at Warwick will be given in the Autumn Term.
If you are thinking of teaching as a career you may need to submit a PGCE application early in the autumn term. Some PGCE modules work on a first come, first served basis. Most have early closing dates.
The Assessment System: conventions and procedures

Throughout your studies you are assessed through a combination of essays and unseen examinations which take place at the end of each year. The marks obtained in the first year have not counted towards your final degree classification. Final degree classes for the BA are awarded by the Final Year Examination Board, based primarily on the average of all the marks you have gained across the second and third years. The scale of marks equivalent to classification is as follows:


70 and above First

60-69 2.1

50-59 2.2

40-49 3rd

39 and below Fail

The degree classification conventions which the Final Year Examination Board must use are not confidential and apply to all undergraduate students at Warwick. They are outlined in detail at:


http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/quality/categories/examinations/conventions/ug08/
Further information about examinations may be obtained from your module tutors, your personal tutor, or the department’s Examinations Secretary, José Arroyo.

17-point marking scale

Where an assessment or exam is a single piece of work, or a small number of long exam answers, 1st and 2nd year work will be marked using the 17-point marking scale outlined below.
(The descriptors in the following table are interpreted as appropriate to the subject and the year/level of study, and implicitly cover good academic practice and the avoidance of plagiarism. We publish more detailed departmental marking criteria in Appendix 4.)
With the exception of Zero, the descriptors cover a range of marks, with the location within each group dependent on the extent to which the elements in the descriptor and departmental marking criteria are met.


Class

Scale

Descriptor

First

Excellent 1st

Exceptional work of the highest quality, demonstrating excellent knowledge and understanding, analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills. At final-year level: work may achieve or be close to publishable standard.

High 1st

Very high quality work demonstrating excellent knowledge and understanding, analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills. Work which may extend existing debates or interpretations.

Mid 1st

Low 1st

Upper Second (2.1)

High 2.1

High quality work demonstrating good knowledge and understanding, analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills.

Mid 2.1

Low 2.1

Lower Second

High 2.2

Competent work, demonstrating reasonable knowledge and understanding, some analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills.

Mid 2.2

Low 2.2

Third

High 3rd

Work of limited quality, demonstrating some relevant knowledge and understanding.

Mid 3rd

Low 3rd

Fail

High Fail (sub Honours)

Work does not meet standards required for the appropriate stage of an Honours degree. There may be evidence of some basic understanding of relevant concepts and techniques

Fail

Poor quality work well below the standards required for the appropriate stage of an Honours degree.

Low Fail

Zero

Zero

Work of no merit OR Absent, work not submitted, penalty in some misconduct cases

For calculating module results, the points on this marking scale have the following numerical equivalents:




Class

Point on scale

numerical equivalent

range of marks for work marked using all points on 0-100 scale

First

Excellent 1st

96

93-100

High 1st

89

85-92

Mid 1st

81

78-84

Low 1st

74

70-77

Upper Second

High 2.1

68

67-69

Mid 2.1

65

64-66

Low 2.1

62

60-63

Lower Second

High 2.2

58

57-59

Mid 2.2

55

54-56

Low 2.2

52

50-53

Third

High 3rd

48

47-49

Mid 3rd

45

44-46

Low 3rd

42

40-43

Fail

High Fail

38

35-39

Fail

25

19-34

Low Fail

12

1-18

Zero

Zero

0



So, if an essay or exam answer is awarded the grade ‘Mid 2.1’ this means that it will count as a numerical mark of 65 for the purpose of calculating your final grade for the relevant module.


The Final Year Examination Board meets towards the end of the summer term. It consists of the full-time academic staff of the department and two external examiners.
Finalists will be advised of the date of the board, and it is strongly recommended that they attend on the day to receive a detailed explanation of how their degree result was achieved. There is also a party on the afternoon of the exam board.
Your personal tutor will be able to give you full details of your marks following the board. If you are not able to be present but would like to be sent your marks, please give your personal tutor a self-addressed envelope.
Examinations test your understanding of critical and theoretical issues and your coverage of the syllabus, as well as your ability to write concisely and at short notice (see appendix 3 guidelines on preparation for and writing under examination conditions). Assessed essays give you the opportunity to display your command of close textual analysis and historical research, and your ability to collect and organise evidence. They develop your analytic, rhetorical and writing skills (see appendix 2 guidelines for the writing of essays). They also allow you to learn from comments and corrections by tutors.
You may not repeat material from your assessed essays in any examinations, (though you may repeat material from unassessed essays). If in doubt about this, consult module tutors or your personal tutor.
Essays will normally be returned to you within four weeks (20 university working days), with an agreed internal grade, and detailed comments from the first marker who, as your module tutor, is in the best position to make them. The role of the second marker is to monitor the standards of marking (rather than offer a second set of comments) and to resolve the internal grade. The internal grade may be adjusted later by the external examiners. Even though it may be subject to revision, it is felt to be appropriate to give you the agreed internal mark and feedback before it is confirmed by the externals, as this forms part of the learning process (this is also past students’ preference). Significant adjustments, though they can happen, tend to be very rare.
You will find in appendix 5 guidelines for the assessment criteria in operation in the department.

Third Year: Choice of Assessment Method

Because of the large degree of optionality in the third year, assessment patterns vary. Your choice of assessment will depend on the method of assessment offered by individual modules (for instance some options are 100% assessed, with no choice), as well as your own choice out of the possibilities offered when several assessment options are possible (e.g. some film options can be 100% assessed or 50% assessed/50% examined). Please note that there is no minimum quota of examinations which you need to take.


Essay Lengths

You must provide a word count at the end of your essay. 10% variation on the required length, in either direction, is acceptable.


Essay Titles

Essay titles will be published at least 4 weeks before the essay deadline.


Presentation of Dissertations

The conventions for the presentation of undergraduate dissertations are laid out in Appendix 4.


You should attach a copy of the front sheet (see appendix 8 of the handbook), and the usual rule applies allowing a 10% variation on the required word-length in either direction.
Essay Deadlines and Submission

All essays should be handed in by 12 noon on the day stated below; Film essays to the Film and Television Studies departmental secretary (room A0.12), Literature essays to the English department (Reception 5th Floor of Humanities Building). Cover sheets for literature modules are available from the English department. Please see English Department guidelines regarding hard copy and e-submission of assessed work:


http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/currentstudents/undergraduate/essay
All essays for Film and Television modules must be submitted in hard copy form. Failure to do so by the specified deadline will mean that your essay is LATE and you will be subject to the appropriate penalties (see p.41).
No essays for any department can be submitted by fax or email.
All hard copies of essays should be accompanied by a securely attached and fully completed front sheet (see appendix 7). Copies of the sheet are available from the departmental office, and should be collected in advance – not filled in when you arrive to submit the essay. Mark and comment sheets will be attached to essays when they are returned. These will be available for collection from the departmental office.



You must hand in two hard copies of all Film and Television Studies essays; the cover sheet only asks for your student number so that the essay will be marked anonymously if you wish. You will need to check with other departments whether they require two copies and anonymity. Normally students hand their essays in personally. If for any reason it is not possible to hand in the work in person, you are advised not to leave the submission to the last minute, and to ask the student entrusted with the task to phone you to confirm that the essay has been signed in. But it should be clear that you are taking the risk of an arrangement going wrong. Retrospective extensions are not given where the essay has been handed to a third party and has gone astray.
N.B. When it comes to deadlines which fall in the first week of the Christmas or Easter vacations, if you are not able to submit your essay in person you may hand it in before the end of term (but check ahead that there will be someone available in the office if you plan to submit it on a Friday) or send it by first class signed for mail. If you do submit an essay due in week 11 by mail, it must arrive by 12.00pm on the deadline day.

Essay Extensions


If there are circumstances which prevent your handing in an essay by the prescribed deadline, you will have to apply for an extension. The conventions which apply depend on the department teaching the module, and are as follows.
For Film and Television Studies modules: the only person who can grant extensions is the Senior Tutor. You will need to fill in an extension request form on Tabula through Start.Warwick. If the extension is agreed, you will be provided with a new deadline.
Extensions are given in the case of significant illness, accompanied by a medical note, or severely challenging personal difficulties. They are not given to cover transport difficulties, poor time management or mistaking or forgetting the time of deadlines. They are not normally given for computer failure unless fully documented. Involvement in extra-curricular university activities are never grounds for an extension if you could reasonably have planned ahead and allotted your time accordingly.
You may wish to use email to alert your module tutor and/or the Senior Tutor if you are aware in advance that circumstances are arising which may cause you to require an extension. You will still need to fill in an extension request form on Tabula.
For English modules: Extension requests should be submitted to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Dr Peter Mack in Term One, Dr Pablo Mukherjee in Terms Two and Three).
In some circumstances in which you have not been granted an extension you may still be advised to complete the assignment and hand it in. In these cases the work will be marked and the mark reported to the appropriate examination board. The board will consider how, if at all, the mark is to be taken into account.

Penalties for Late Submission without an Extension


When work is submitted late and no formal extension has been granted, there is a penalty reduction of the mark by 5 percentage points for each (working) day late.

3RD YEAR ESSAY DEADLINES
TERM ONE

2014 Return date

Friday 5th December (Wk 10) TV Hist & Criticism 5,000 words 7th January

*Tuesday 16th December (Wk 12) Film Aesthetics 5,000 words 16th January

*Tuesday 16th December (Wk 12) Spanish Cinema 5,000 words 16th January



TERM TWO

2015 Return date

Monday 5th January (Wk 1) Postmodernisms 5,000 words 2nd February

Monday 12th January (Wk 2) 70s Hollywood 5,000 words 9th February

Monday 19th January (Wk 3) Documentary 5,000 words 16th February

Monday 16th February (Wk 7) Dissertation 10,000 words 13th March

*Tuesday 31st March (Wk 13) Film Aesthetics 5,000 words 30th April


TERM THREE

2015 Return date

Monday 20th April (Wk 1) Horror & the Gothic 5,000 words 19th May

Monday 27th April (Wk 2) British Film & TV 5,000 words 27th May

Monday 27th April (Wk 2) TV Hist & Criticism 5,000 words 27th May

Tuesday 5th May (Wk 3) Swedish Cinema 5,000 words 3rd June

Monday 11th May (Wk 4) Romantic Comedy 5,000 words 9th June


* Hard copies of essays due in after the end of term (Weeks 11/12) can be sent by post provided they are sent First Class Signed For (http://www.postoffice.co.uk/signed-for-first-class).


Examination information

The syllabus on which examinations are based will be made clear to you in the revision sessions in the summer term. If in doubt, please consult module tutors in the first place, or your personal tutor.


Copies of past examination papers (over the last five years) are available online at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/exampapers
Exam rubrics are posted on the Common Room noticeboards in the summer term and will be explained by module tutors in revision sessions.
Final year examinations usually begin in Week 5 or 6 of the summer term, but exam timetabling arrangements are not made by the department and cannot be guaranteed.


4. TEACHING AND LEARNING


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