Ba in film with television studies



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Health and Safety

Health and Safety matters within the university are overseen by the Safety and Occupational Health Services. Their website (http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/safety) provides a range of detailed information about Health and Safety issues and procedures. In particular, the documents collected under the title of ‘Safety in the University’ (SITU) focus on such things as Health and Safety Training, Risk Assessment, Disability issues, Health Promotion, Computer Workstation/VDU set up, Occupational Health and Stress Management, Accident Reporting etc. The Film and Television Studies department has a Health and Safety policy (hard copy in the department office) and safety and risk assessments are carried out on a regular basis throughout the year. Health and Safety concerns should be raised at Department meetings and/or brought to the attention of the Department Health and Safety Officer.


Health and Safety Personnel

Department Health and Safety Officer: Tracey McVey

Film Studies First Aider: Tracey McVey
Further Advice

Director Safety and Occupational Health Services: Iain MacKirdy (Ext. 50824)

Health and Safety Adviser: Julie Brannon (Ext. 75873)

Senior Occupational Health Adviser: Jane Poole (Ext. 50082)

Fire Safety Officer: Chris Mayfield (Estates Ext. 22561)

Waste and Recycling Manager: Ebiyon Idundun (Estates Ext. 50548)

Warwick University Health Centre (Ext. 24888)
Health and Safety Information

Health and Safety information can be found on the Safety and Occupational Health Services website noted above and (more immediately) on the notice board in the main entrance




  1. If medical assistance is needed, university policy recommends the relevant services be contacted by dialling 999. The Warwick University Health Centre is available for consultation but is a GP practice not a walk-in centre. Their website gives you details of how to contact two out-of-hour surgeries (02476674123 and 02476228606) and provides maps for the closest Accident and Emergency provision at University Hospital in Coventry and Warwick Hospital.

  2. Accidents in the department should be reported. Accident report forms are held in the Film and Television Studies office.

In the case of Fire (See also SITU 22.4)

Fire extinguishers are located in the Department corridor rather than in the teaching rooms, offices or projection booths. University policy in the event of fire is that you should evacuate the building as quickly as possible. The following procedures are recommended:


On discovering a fire: Raise the alarm by breaking the glass in the nearest Break Glass Point which will be situated by main exit doors and along evacuation routes. Report the fire by ringing 999.

On hearing a continuous ringing of the fire bells:



Stop what you are doing.

Leave immediately by the nearest fire exit. The person in charge of a class will direct students to the nearest available exit. Do not use lifts.

Do not stop to collect personal belongings.

Do not attempt to put out a fire.

After any evacuation, stand well clear of the building you have exited from. You may be directed to specified fire assembly points by university staff who will monitor and attend any alarm in progress.

Do not re-enter the building until told it is safe to do so by the Fire Service or university Security staff.
Personal Evacuation Plan

If there are reasons why evacuation from the building might present a significant problem for you personally, you should consult the SOHS website about working out a Personal Evacuation Plan and contact the department’s Health and Safety Officer.



(ii) Outside the Department


The Library

The library plays a crucial part in your studies. It is important that you become familiar with it as soon as possible, in order to make the best possible use of its extensive resources.

Training sessions in Term 1 are arranged by Richard Perkins, the Film and Television Studies Subject Specialist. Richard is available to help you right through your degree course. The best way to contact him is by email at r.perkins@warwick.ac.uk . He is usually in the department on Mondays in room A0.08. You can make an appointment in advance or drop in if you need help with finding resources. Please contact him immediately should there be any problems with library resources for a specific module.


Richard also covers Theatre and German. The Subject Specialist Librarian for English and French is Kate Williams (kate.williams@warwick.ac.uk).
Locations
Most Film & TV books are on Floor 3 of the Library, classified in the range PN 3220 – PN 3279. There should be multiple copies of core texts, and most required seminar reading is available in PDF form on the Library website at:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library/electronicresources/extracts


Material which is in heavy demand is kept in the Short Loan Collection on Floor 1. This includes the large collection of DVDs and some VHS cassettes. At any one time you may borrow 2 books and 2 DVDs from Short Loan in addition to your normal allocation of 15 books.
In order to give everybody the chance to use this material, the loan period for such material is very short, and the fines for late return very heavy. Items are always due the next morning by 11 a.m. (or Monday morning if borrowed Friday to Sunday); the fine rate is £1 per hour overdue! Short Loan items can be booked in advance via the Library catalogue (Encore) for a specific day or weekend slot. We strongly advise that you do this for important DVDs, as the collection is also used extensively by students from other departments.
DVD / Video collection
As stated above, most films are kept in Short Loan, but there are many titles not currently being taught on modules which are held in the External Store (with a longer loan period). These can be requested via the catalogue. Items are transported to the library for collection on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays; the only way to receive an item from the External Store on the day of ordering is to request it before 9.45am on one of the three collection days. If you need to view films in the Library there are DVD / VHS players on Floor 1. Ask at the Help Desk if you need headphones.
The collection is a key educational resource; many DVDs and tapes are irreplaceable and we appeal to all users to treat them accordingly. Please report any faults to the Help Desk.
Study Space
The Library provides a range of study options. Floors 1 and 2 are designed for social / group working, and the atmosphere is relaxed. Floors 3-5 are more traditional spaces for individual, quiet study. If you prefer to work in complete silence there are two silent reading rooms on the Floor 2 Extension, near the science books. The Library is open every day (including weekends) from 8.30am to 12.00am.
Closer to Millburn House you will find The Learning Grid, a space run by the Library in University House. This is open 24/7, and caters for group working.

IT/Computer Facilities and Training for Students
IT Services provide the essential resources and support necessary to give all members of the University access to information technology for research, teaching, learning and administration purposes. If students have problems using the facilities or systems provided by IT Services, they can go to the Helpdesk located on the ground floor of the Library building, telephone 024 765 73737 or email helpdesk@warwick.ac.uk.
Every student is entitled to register to use the services provided by IT Services, which can be accessed from anywhere on campus. Information on setting up an account, accessing the network from on and off campus, printing and purchasing computers is available on-line at http://warwick.ac.uk/its. IT Services also produce information on acceptable use of University IT facilities for students and staff: http://warwick.ac.uk/regulation31. A student handbook produced by IT Services will be available at the Film and Television Studies induction session.
Links to internet based research resources relevant to Film and Television Studies can be found on our website (www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/film/resources/internet/).
Cinema Provision on Campus
The Arts Centre Cinema, on campus, shows on average eight different films a week (with two different screenings every evening). Films and special study days (to which members of the department occasionally contribute) are widely publicised on campus. Module tutors may draw your attention to specific films, but we strongly urge you to keep up with new releases beyond specific recommendations. Students may work as ushers in the cinema (enquire with the Arts Centre).
The Students’ Union Film Society also shows a substantial programme of mainstream and independent films. Only industry standard equipment is used, playing 35mm, 70mm and DCI compliant movies in L3 on the Science Concourse. Membership (as of 2014) is £3.50 and ticket prices thereafter are £2.50. For programme information or to join the Film Society visit:
http://www.warwicksu.com/societies/filmsoc or email: info@filmsoc.warwick.ac.uk
The Language Centre
The Language Centre supports the University's commitment to the increased provision of foreign language learning opportunities for undergraduate and postgraduate students and staff across the University. It is equipped with digital language classrooms and seminar rooms, with data projection and electronic whiteboards. There is also a multi-media open access suite with satellite TV, computer-based learning, and DVD players. There are a number of choices available for acquiring a new foreign language or brushing up language skills:
(i) Modules for credits on the academic programme
These can usually be taken as part of an undergraduate degree course, but this must be agreed with student’s home department before enrolling. More information available online from: http://warwick.ac.uk/languagecentre/academic/
(ii) Academic modules not for credit
The same modules as those available for academic credit are also available to take in addition to degree studies. A fee applies to these modules. Further information is available from the Centre’s website.
(iii) Lifelong Language Learning (LLL) Courses
A programme of language courses for students, members of staff and the public. More information is available from: http://warwick.ac.uk/languagecentre/lifelonglearning/.
The Language Centre (http://warwick.ac.uk/languagecentre) is located on the ground floor of the Humanities Building and can be contacted by email language.enquiries@warwick.ac.uk.
YEAR ONE CURRICULUM

You will have received advance information on these modules. Detailed programmes and reading lists will be handed out by module tutors at the first session.


BA IN FILM AND LITERATURE: First year modules for 2014-2015

(for assessment see section below)


FI106 Basic Issues and Methods: Film History

Module tutors: Stephen Gundle (Autumn), Stella Bruzzi (Spring) with Nike Jung (Autumn) and Isabel Rhodes (Spring)

2 screenings per week

1 lecture per week (1 hour)

1 seminar per week (1 hour)
FI107 Basic Issues and Methods: Film Criticism

Module tutors: Alastair Phillips (Autumn), José Arroyo (Spring) with Owen Weetch

2 screenings per week

1 lecture per week (1 hour)

1 seminar per week (1 hour)
EN122 Modes of Reading

Module convenor: Gemma Goodman (English)

1 lecture per week (1 hour)

1 seminar per week (1 hour)



FR109 Aspects of Modern French and German Literature

Module tutors: Autumn: Susan Beardmore (German) and Spring: Siân Miles (French)

2 lectures per week

Seminars as in module handouts





BA IN FILM STUDIES: First year modules for 2014-2015

(for assessment see section below)


FI106 Basic Issues and Methods: Film History

Module tutors: Stephen Gundle (Autumn), Stella Bruzzi (Spring) with Nike Jung (Autumn) and Isabel Rhodes (Spring)

2 screenings per week

1 lecture per week (1 hour)

1 seminar per week (1 hour)
FI107 Basic Issues and Methods: Film Criticism

Module tutors: Alastair Phillips (Autumn), José Arroyo (Spring) with Owen Weetch

2 screenings per week

1 lecture per week (1 hour)

1 seminar per week (1 hour)
FI108 Theories of the Moving Image

Module tutor: Catherine Constable (Autumn), Karl Schoonover (Spring) with Mario Slugan (Autumn) and Charlotte Stevens (Spring)

1 Screening per week

1 Lecture per week (1 hour)

1 Seminar per week (1½ hours)
FI109 Visual Cultures

Module tutor: Michael Pigott, Louis Bayman (Autumn), and Helen Wheatley (Spring)

1 Screening per week

1 Lecture per week (1 hour)

1 Seminar per week (1½ - 2 hours)
ASSESSMENT
The Assessment System: conventions and procedures

Throughout your studies, you are assessed through a combination of essays and unseen examinations, which take place at the end of each year. At the end of the first year, you need to achieve an overall pass mark of 40 in each module in order to proceed to the second year. The actual marks obtained will not count towards your final degree classification. However, they are an important indication of your progress and it is important that you do your best from the very beginning. (N.B. employers sometimes ask for academic referees to comment on 1st year performance as well as degree results.) Final degree classes for the BA are awarded by the Final Year Examination Board. The scale of marks equivalent to classification is as follows:

70 and above First

60-69 2.1

50-59 2.2

40-49 3rd



39 and below Fail

17-point marking scale

Where an assessment or exam is a single piece of work, or a small number of long exam answers, work will be marked using the 17-point marking scale outlined below.
(The descriptors in the following table are interpreted as appropriate to the subject and the year/level of study, and implicitly cover good academic practice and the avoidance of plagiarism. We publish more detailed departmental marking criteria in Appendix 4.)
With the exception of Zero, the descriptors cover a range of marks, with the location within each group dependent on the extent to which the elements in the descriptor and departmental marking criteria are met.


Class

Scale

Descriptor

First

Excellent 1st

Exceptional work of the highest quality, demonstrating excellent knowledge and understanding, analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills. At final-year level: work may achieve or be close to publishable standard.

High 1st

Very high quality work demonstrating excellent knowledge and understanding, analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills. Work which may extend existing debates or interpretations.

Mid 1st

Low 1st

Upper Second (2.1)

High 2.1

High quality work demonstrating good knowledge and understanding, analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills.

Mid 2.1

Low 2.1

Lower Second

High 2.2

Competent work, demonstrating reasonable knowledge and understanding, some analysis, organisation, accuracy, relevance, presentation and appropriate skills.

Mid 2.2

Low 2.2

Third

High 3rd

Work of limited quality, demonstrating some relevant knowledge and understanding.

Mid 3rd

Low 3rd

Fail

High Fail (sub Honours)

Work does not meet standards required for the appropriate stage of an Honours degree. There may be evidence of some basic understanding of relevant concepts and techniques

Fail

Poor quality work well below the standards required for the appropriate stage of an Honours degree.

Low Fail

Zero

Zero

Work of no merit OR Absent, work not submitted, penalty in some misconduct cases

For calculating module results, the points on this marking scale have the following numerical equivalents:




Class

Point on scale

numerical equivalent

range of marks for work marked using all points on 0-100 scale

First

Excellent 1st

96

93-100

High 1st

89

85-92

Mid 1st

81

78-84

Low 1st

74

70-77

Upper Second

High 2.1

68

67-69

Mid 2.1

65

64-66

Low 2.1

62

60-63

Lower Second

High 2.2

58

57-59

Mid 2.2

55

54-56

Low 2.2

52

50-53

Third

High 3rd

48

47-49

Mid 3rd

45

44-46

Low 3rd

42

40-43

Fail

High Fail

38

35-39

Fail

25

19-34

Low Fail

12

1-18

Zero

Zero

0



So, if an essay or exam answer is awarded the grade ‘Mid 2.1’ this means that it will count as a numerical mark of 65 for the purpose of calculating your final grade for the relevant module.


Further information about examinations may be obtained from your module tutors, your personal tutor, or the department’s Examinations Secretary, José Arroyo.
The First Year Examination Board meets at the end of the summer term. Further information about this Board, the regulations which govern it, and the procedures it follows is available at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/examinations/fyboe/guide/
In each case the Board will make one of three recommendations:

1) To allow you to proceed to your second year of study.

2) To require you to take further exams in September, and/or to present further written work for assessment, before a further Examination Board meets in late September.


  1. To recommend that you withdraw from your course of study. (Students in this category may, if they wish, take further tests in the summer vacation.)

Your personal tutor will be able to give you a full breakdown of your marks following the board. If you are not able to be present but would like to be sent your overall module grades, please give Tracey McVey a self-addressed envelope, and remember to see your personal tutor at the beginning of your second year to discuss your results. Do not request marks by email or telephone.


Examinations test your understanding of critical and theoretical issues and your coverage of the syllabus, as well as your ability to write concisely and at short notice (see appendix 3 guidelines on preparation for and writing under examination conditions). Assessed essays give you the opportunity to display your command of close textual analysis and historical research, and your ability to collect and organise evidence. They develop your analytic, rhetorical and writing skills (see appendix 2 guidelines for the writing of essays). They also allow you to learn from comments and corrections by tutors.
You may not repeat material from your assessed essays in any examination, (though you may repeat material from unassessed or formative essays). If in doubt about this, consult module tutors or your personal tutor.
Essays will normally be returned to you within four weeks (20 university working days), with an agreed internal grade and detailed comments from the marker.
You will find in appendix 5 guidelines for the assessment criteria in operation in the department.
All modules are examined at the end of the first year. The detail of proportion of essay and exam work in the first year is as follows:
FI106 Basic Issues and Methods: Film History

Assessment:

Essay 1 x 3,000 words 30%

Essay 1 x 3,000 words 30%

Examination: 2 hours 40%

FI107 Basic Issues and Methods: Film Criticism

Assessment:

Essay 1 x 1,500 words 30%

Essay 1 x 1,500 words 30%

Examination: 2 hours 40%

FI108 Theories of the Moving Image

Assessment:

1 x essay, 2,000 words 30%

1 x essay, 2,000 words 30%

Examination: 2 hours 40%
FI109 Visual Cultures

Assessment:

1 x essay 1,500 words 30%

1 x essay 1,500 words 30%

Examination: 2 hours 40%
Modes of Reading (EN122)

Assessment: 2 essays (3,500 words each) 100%



Aspects of Modern French and German Literature (FR 109)

Assessment: 2 essays (2,500 words each) 40%

Examination: 3 hours 60%
Essay Lengths

You must provide a word count at the end of your essay. 10% variation on the required length, in either direction, is acceptable.


Essay Titles

Essay titles will be published at least 4 weeks before the essay deadline.


Essay Deadlines and Submission

All essays should be submitted by 12.00 noon on the day stated below. All 1st year Film essays must be submitted both in hard copy form and in electronic form via the e-submission system. Hard copies of Film Studies essays should be handed in to the Film and Television Studies departmental secretary (room A0.12), French Literature to the French department (room H4.42), German Literature to the German department (room H2.05) and Modes of Reading to the English department (Reception 5th Floor Humanities Building). Film essays must not be submitted by fax or email.
N.B. When it comes to deadlines which fall in the first weeks of the Christmas or Easter vacations, if you are not able to submit your essay hard copy in person you may hand it in before the end of term (but check ahead that there will be someone available in the office if you plan to submit it on a Friday) or send it by first class signed-for mail. If you do submit an essay hard copy due in week 11 by mail, it must arrive by 12.00pm on the deadline day.
For Film and Television modules, the electronic version of your essay must be submitted though Tabula at Start.Warwick:
https://start.warwick.ac.uk
The deadline for electronic submission is exactly the same as for the hard copy: 12.00pm on the day stated below. Full instructions on how to upload your essay are provided on the department’s e-submission web-page. Please remember your essay will not be considered to have been submitted until you have handed in your hard copy AND uploaded your essay via the e-submission system. Failure to do either by the specified deadline will mean that your essay is LATE and you will be subject to the appropriate penalties (see p.21).
All hard copies of essays should be accompanied by a securely attached and fully completed front sheet (see appendix 8). This sheet can also be downloaded from our website (www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/film/undergrads/). Copies of the sheet are available from the departmental office, and should be collected in advance – not filled in when you arrive to submit the essay. The cover sheet only asks for your student number so that the essay will be marked anonymously if you wish. Normally students hand their essays in personally. If for any reason it is not possible to hand in the work in person, you are advised not to leave the submission to the last minute, and to ask the student entrusted with the task to phone you to confirm that the essay has been signed in. But it should be clear that you are taking the risk of an arrangement going wrong. Retrospective extensions are not given where the essay has been handed to a third party and has gone astray.
Mark and comment sheets will be attached to essays when they are returned. These are usually computer generated, but some module tutors may ask you to attach hard copies to your essays before you hand them in. These are also available from the departmental office.
Students diagnosed with Dyslexia should register with Disability Services. They will assist in providing yellow stickers which should be attached to the front of assessed essays to alert the tutor. Visit www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/tutors/disability for further information.


Essay Extensions


If there are circumstances which prevent your handing in an essay by the prescribed deadline, you will have to apply for an extension. The conventions which apply depend on the department teaching the module, and are as follows:
For Film Studies modules: the only person who can grant extensions is the Senior Tutor. You will need to fill in an extension request form on Tabula through Start.Warwick. If the extension is agreed, you will be provided with a new deadline.
Extensions are given in the case of significant illness, accompanied by a medical note, or comparable difficulty. They are not given to cover transport difficulties, poor time management or mistaking/forgetting the time of deadlines. They are not normally given for computer failure unless this is fully documented. Involvement in extra-curricular university activities are never grounds for an extension if you could reasonably have planned ahead and organised your time accordingly.
You may wish to use email to alert your module tutor and/or the Senior Tutor if you are aware that circumstances are arising which may cause you to require an extension. You will still need to fill in an extension request form on Tabula.
For English modules: extension requests for English modules should be submitted to the Director of Undergraduate Studies (Dr Sarah Moss).
For French and German modules: extension requests should be directed to both the Director of Undergraduate Studies in German (Dr Jim Jordan in Term One; Prof Mary Cosgrove in Terms Two and Three) and the Senior Tutor of Film and Television Studies.
In some circumstances in which you have not been granted an extension you may still be advised to complete the assignment and hand it in. In these cases the work will be marked and the mark reported to the appropriate examination board. The board will consider how, if at all, the mark is to be taken into account.

Penalties for Late Submission without an Extension


When work is submitted late and no formal extension has been granted, there is a penalty of 5 percentage points reduction of the mark per (working) day late.
Feedback

The department places great importance on maintaining teaching of the highest quality. To help achieve this, at the end of the Autumn and Spring term, module leaders will ask you to fill in an anonymous questionnaire, in which you are invited to reflect on various aspects of the teaching of the module. Please be frank and constructive in your replies as these responses play an important part in enhancing the quality of modules. Issues raised through module feedback are discussed at SSLC meetings.


ESSAY DEADLINES
TERM ONE

2014 Return Date

Monday 27th October (Wk 5) Visual Cultures 1,500 words 24th November

Tuesday 28th October (Wk 5) Modes of Reading Formative

Monday 3rd November (Wk 6) Basic Issues: Criticism 1,500 words 1st December

Friday 7th November (Wk 6) Theories of Mov. Image Formative

Monday 17th November (Wk 8) German Literature Formative

Tuesday 18th November (Wk 8) Modes of Reading Formative

*Tuesday 9th December (Wk 11) Basic Issues: History 3,000 words 9th January

*Tuesday 9th December (Wk 11) Theories of Mov. Image 2,000 words 9th January

TERM TWO

2015 Return Date

Tuesday 13th January (Wk 2) Modes of Reading 3,500 words 10th February

Monday 9th February (Wk 6) Basic Issues: Criticism 1,500 words 9th March

Monday 23rd February (Wk 8) French Literature

Monday 2nd March (Wk 9) Visual Cultures 1,500 words 30th March

*Tuesday 17th March (Wk 11) Basic Issues: History 3,000 words 16th April


TERM THREE

2015 Return Date

Monday 27th April (Wk 2) Theories of Mov. Image 2,000 words 27th May

Tuesday 28th April (Wk 2) Modes of Reading 3,500 words 28th May

Monday 11th May (Wk 4) French Literature 2,500 words 9th June

Monday 18th May (Wk 5) German Literature 2,500 words 16th June
* Hard copies of essays due in after the end of term (Week 11) can be sent by post provided they are sent First Class Signed For (http://www.postoffice.co.uk/signed-for-first-class) to arrive by 12.00 noon on the submission day.
Examination information

The syllabus on which examinations are based will be made clear to you by each module tutor in the revision sessions in the summer term. If in doubt, please consult module tutors in the first place, or your personal tutor.


Copies of past examination papers (set within the last five years) are available online at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/exampapers

Exam rubrics are posted on the noticeboard by the pigeonholes in the summer term and will be explained by module tutors in revision sessions.


First year examinations are often scheduled to begin in week 6 of the summer term, but exam timetabling arrangements are not made by the department and cannot be guaranteed.
YEAR TWO CURRICULUM
BA IN FILM AND LITERATURE – 2nd year film modules for 2014-2015

(for assessment: see section below)

You will have received advance information on these modules. Detailed programmes and reading lists will be handed out by module tutors at the first session.

Core module


FI102 Hollywood Cinema

Module tutors: Ed Gallafent (Autumn) and James MacDowell (Spring) with Jo Oldham, Patrick Pilkington (Autumn) and Catherine Lester (Spring)

1 screening per week

1 lecture per week (1 hour)

1 seminar per week (1 hour)
And one of either
FI204 National Cinemas

Module tutors: Stephen Gundle (Autumn) and Karl Schoonover (Spring) with Santiago Oyarzabal (Autumn) and Ivan Girina (Spring)

1 screening per week

1 lecture per week (1 hour)

1 seminar per week (1 hour)

OR
FI203 Silent Cinema

Module tutor: Paul Cuff (Autumn & Spring)

1 Screening per week

1 lecture per week (1 hour)

1 seminar per week (1 hour)
BA IN FILM STUDIES - 2nd year film modules for 2013-2014

Students on this degree take Hollywood Cinema and National Cinemas (core modules) - see above.


Optional Core Modules (choice of a maximum of two)
FI205 Television History and Criticism

Module tutors: Rachel Moseley (Autumn) and Lauren Thompson (Spring)

1 Screening per week

1 lecture per week

1 seminar per week
AND/OR
FI203 Silent Cinema

Module tutor: Paul Cuff (Autumn & Spring)

1 screening per week

1 lecture per week (1 hour)

1 seminar per week (1 hour)
AND/OR
TH237 Audio-Visual Avant Gardes

Module Tutor Michael Pigott (Autumn and Spring)

1 screening per week

Lecture and seminar schedule varies each week, use the link below to access the weekly schedule:


http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/film/current/undergrads/outlines/avag
Details of optional English modules outside the Department can be found at:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/currentstudents/undergraduate/modules/optionsmarket



IATL (Institute for Advanced Teaching and Learning) offer the following modules:

IL001 Forms of Identity: An Interdisciplinary Approach (15 CATS)


IL002 Navigating Psychopathology (15 CATS)
IL004 Creative Writing Across Genres (15 CATS)
IL005 Applied Imagination: An Interdisciplinary Exploration (15 CATS)
IL006 Challenges of Climate Change (15 CATS)
IL007 Human-Animal Studies (15 CATS)
IL008 Reinventing Education (15 CATS)
IL009 The IATL Undergraduate Research Project (15 CATS)
IL508 Foundations of Mathematics (15 CATS)
IL509 Obscenity, Libel and Press Regulation in Britain, 1660-today (15 CATS)
IL510 Product Design and Development (15 CATS)
IL511 Twentieth-Century Popular Culture (15 CATS)
IL512 Strategic Investment and International Business Environments [SIIBE] (15 CATS)

Choice of Option modules for Third Year



BA in Film and Literature

In your third year you will take one core film module (FI301: Film Aesthetics) and at least one literature option module. The remaining 60 CATS you need to take in your final year can be made up of film or literature modules, or a combination of both.

However, if you wish to take a Language Centre module or a module not listed in the Faculty of Arts Option booklet, you will require the approval of the Head of Film and Television Studies.
BA in Film Studies
In your third year you will take one core module (FI301: Film Aesthetics). Of the remaining 90 CATs, at least 30 must come from film options and the remainder can be chosen from film or from the options available in the Faculty of Arts (booklet will be available on-line)


Dissertations

The opportunity exists for students to write a dissertation in place of one of their final year options. The dissertation is a 10,000 word piece of original research, and you can apply to write on any topic in film and television studies. The decision to permit a student to write a dissertation will be taken by the Head of Department. He will consider


[i] your background in the proposed subject area

[ii] your record, particularly the marks for assessed essay work, so far in the degree

[iii] the suitability of the topic as an undergraduate dissertation

[iv] the availability of suitable supervision.


Students writing dissertations are required to attend all the lectures and meetings listed below.
The procedures and timetable are as follows:

In the Second Year:
Week 7 of Spring Term: Lecture/workshop: ‘Formulating a Dissertation Topic’. All those considering this option must attend this. A form on which the project is to be outlined will be given out at this meeting
Friday of Week 10, Spring Term: Last day for return of forms. These forms should be submitted to Adam Gallimore in hard copy and will be logged in, in the same way as an assessed essay.
Monday of Week 2, Summer Term: Notice indicating successful applications and naming supervisors is given.
Second Year:

Summer Term

Weeks 9 and 10

Contact your supervisor and arrange a meeting to discuss your dissertation and proposed work over the summer holiday period.



First Supervisory Meeting


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