Asus Pirated software and dissemination of confidential data


Intelligence dissemination management - Russian Contemporary



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Intelligence dissemination management - Russian Contemporary

  • The Soviet net assessment process cannot be directly observed. Like a dark object in outer space, its probable nature can be discerned only from interactions with visible surroundings. Fortunately, its rigidly secret environment has been somewhat subject to countervailing conditions. . . . Tukhachevsky and his associates conducted relatively open discussion in print.

Intelligence dissemination management - Chinese Contemporary

  • There is intense secrecy about Chinese national security matters, but comparisons with other nations' processes of strategic assessment can increase our understanding of how China may assess its future security environment. By viewing China in comparative perspective, it may be possible to understand better how China deals with its assessment problems.

Intelligence dissemination management - Chinese Contemporary

  • Comparing the Soviet structure with Chinese materials in the 1990s, it is apparent from the way in which Soviet strategic assessment was performed in the 1930s that a number of similarities, at least in institutional roles and the vocabulary of Marxism-Leninism, can also be seen in contemporary China

Intelligence dissemination management - Chinese Contemporary

  • Another similarity was that the Communist Party leader chaired a defense council or main military committee and in these capacities attended peacetime military exercises and was involved deciding the details of military strategy, weapons acquisition, and war planning.

Intelligence dissemination management - Chinese Contemporary

  • In the US, there are independent or ideologically associated think tanks, and there are government contract research organizations both not-for-profit and for-profit

Intelligence dissemination management - Strategic Gaming

  • . This section is not intended to be a general discussion of strategic gaming, but to address the role that intelligence material will play in constructing and playing the game. It is not uncommon, at national levels, to have intelligence analysts in the Red Force or other nations in a multilateral game, play their counterpart or an equivalent commander in the country or group on which they are expert.

Intelligence dissemination management - Participation by Top-Level Policymakers

  • Even at national-level games, it has always been the US practice never to have the incumbent President as an actual player, although some have observed. The rationale is preventing any adversary from knowing, with high confidence, how a President will decide in a given circumstance. The Presidential player typically is a former Cabinet member with extensive politicomilitary experience.

Intelligence dissemination management - Participation by Top-Level Policymakers

  • Britain, however, may regard top-level games as a valuable practice exercise for policymakers. Margaret Thatcher was reputed to play in these games, and be very serious about them.

Intelligence dissemination management - Warfighter and Battle Labs

  • Strategic gaming is to be distinguished from training exercises, although there are training exercises for generals at the division (two-star) and corps (three-star) levels

Intelligence dissemination management - Cold War gaming

  • During the Cold War when major nuclear exchanges were a real possibility, the two sides understood one another reasonably well. Over time, even more so after the end of the USSR, Russia and the US have taken various steps to avoid military misunderstanding, such as putting liaison teams into one another's' strategic warning centers.

Intelligence dissemination management - Cold War gaming

  • In the beginning of the Cold War, strategic gaming, given the massive retaliation strategies of the earlier parts of the Cold War, concentrated on major nuclear exchanges

Intelligence dissemination management - Cold War gaming

  • Scenarios began to be explored that involved conventional warfare between the US and USSR, and proxy war.

Intelligence dissemination management - Cold War gaming

  • As important as the joint, interactive nature of the game was, GLOBAL increasingly was recognized for the realism injected into the decisionmaking that represented what might be expected in a global superpower military confrontation

Intelligence dissemination management - Cold War gaming

  • :*The absolute necessity for the prompt use of strategic warning

Intelligence dissemination management - Cold War gaming

  • :*The requirement to examine military strategies for protracted conventional war

Intelligence dissemination management - Cold War gaming

  • One of the reasons for this favorable appraisal [of GLOBAL] was the growing involvement of the military services and relevant civilian agencies of the federal government in a common forum. Another was the opportunity to challenge conventional wisdom by imposing real-world constraints on untested theories.

Intelligence dissemination management - Cold War gaming

  • Finally, this sorting out of the conventional from the game-tested wisdom helped the players, in the real world after the exercise was over, to focus on the pertinent second-order issues.

Intelligence dissemination management - Cold War gaming

  • The games were educational for the intelligence community, in learning the sort of information that policymakers needed in a critical situation, in understanding the information that needed to be researched even to create a plausible scenario

Intelligence dissemination management - Contemporary Gaming: the 1920s in a new version?

  • Andy Marshall, the Director of Net Assessment in the Pentagon and a notable consumer of wargaming, has argued that the circumstances facing the United States today, in terms of strategic uncertainty, are quite similar to those we confronted in the early 1920s

Intelligence dissemination management - Contemporary Gaming: the 1920s in a new version?

  • Between the World Wars, games tended to be service specific. One service's intelligence was unlikely to consult with another, so the interactions of land-based aircraft, other than naval aviation, might not be considered. The British also did such games, yet Churchill described, in his history of WWII, that the Sinking of Prince of Wales and Repulse was his greatest shock of the war.

Intelligence dissemination management - Contemporary Gaming: the 1920s in a new version?

  • Perhaps because the Navy was more used to map exercises than the Army, the Naval War College was able to develop new concepts through gaming. Part of this was defining the requirements

Intelligence dissemination management - Contemporary Gaming: the 1920s in a new version?

  • for a measured, step-by-step offensive campaign, and began to appreciate the potential of naval aviation to operate as a principal offensive system, rather than as a scouting arm, for the main battle fleet. The aviators were both providers of intelligence as scouts, and consumers of intelligence for strike planning.

Intelligence dissemination management - Contemporary Gaming: the 1920s in a new version?

  • What trends appear to be emerging from contemporary wargaming that can help shape our (significantly downsized) armed forces for the next century, as well as planning the intelligence community to meet the warfighters' needs? What are the lessons we have learned and where are the lessons to be learned? Priorities, all intelligence-dependent, seem to include: surveillance and precision strike capabilities, information technology and warfare, advanced battle management, and mutually supportive assets, the latter including military and national intelligence.

Intelligence dissemination management - Surveillance and precision strike capabilities

  • Attention must be paid to the survivability of intelligence cycle components, from sensors to dissemination, and what happens when they are degraded.

Intelligence dissemination management - Surveillance and precision strike capabilities

  • From the first Army AAN wargame, the essential role of space in C4ISTAR|C3I and ISTAR|ISR was apparent

Intelligence dissemination management - Surveillance and precision strike capabilities

  • Tight coupling of sensors and precision attack might shift frameworks to a halting rather than a buildup or counterattack framework. Gaming can explore the intelligence requirements to know what are the centers of gravity for halting frameworks.

Intelligence dissemination management - Information technology and warfare

  • Current games, especially when using actual C3I equipment, are exploring the amounts of intelligence information that may flow, and the communications support that will be needed

Intelligence dissemination management - Information technology and warfare

  • In the 1930s, naval officers began to understand the need for task force organization. Games have to explore the interoperability of intelligence systems for ad hoc, interservice task forces. There is a need to understand what happens if the opponent has comparably sophisticated organizational flexibility, C3I, and ISR.

Intelligence dissemination management - Information technology and warfare

  • Are the services anticipating the changing nature of future conflict in their wargaming? Are the experiences from those wargames enriching or challenging the services' vision? Are the lessons learned in the wargames played by the separate services being transferred into the joint arena? In other words, when it comes to wargames, who's winning and who's losing.

Intelligence dissemination management - Major Games

  • The major games, authorized by explicit Congressional funding, all taught lessons, including that the services were not starting from a terribly coherent future picture. Services reached a bit less into the future, and made significant changes to their doctrinal frameworks.

Intelligence dissemination management - Major Games

  • This process was especially informational to military intelligence producers and consumers, as well as to the analysts concerned with technological development and where and when to focus.

Intelligence dissemination management - US Navy: GLOBAL

  • Played between 1979 and 1990, the games during the Cold War contributed to the Maritime Strategy doctrinal framework for forward engagements of the Soviets. After the fall of the USSR, however, the threat became more diffuse and the games were criticized.

Intelligence dissemination management - US Navy: GLOBAL

  • They led to the new framework From the Sea, associated with intelligence-intensive network-centric warfare. Again, both intelligence and operations people learned more about each other's needs and capabilities.

Intelligence dissemination management - US Army: Army After Next/Transformation Wargame

  • Beginning in 1997 the Army's Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) began annual Army After Next (AAN) games—the AAN being viewed as what the presently planned digitized Army (Force XXI) would interact with a strong enemy in the year 2020

Intelligence dissemination management - US Army: Army After Next/Transformation Wargame

  • :*The strong influence of space-based systems on ground combat operations

Intelligence dissemination management - US Army: Army After Next/Transformation Wargame

  • :*The vulnerability of ground forces to information warfare attacks

Intelligence dissemination management - US Army: Army After Next/Transformation Wargame

  • :*A reluctance on the part of national leaders to commit ground troops to a region early in a crisis

Intelligence dissemination management - US Army: Army After Next/Transformation Wargame

  • Early AAN results led to opposition from senior leaders, who regarded their comments as reality checks

Intelligence dissemination management - US Army: Army After Next/Transformation Wargame

  • Both the games and real-world Army experience has taught that simply calling something transformational will not make it so, and tough testing, in games as well as battle lab|battle laboratories, is essential.. The Army had to experience Intelligence cycle management#Intelligence friction in Kosovo|intelligence problems in Kosovo before it could define the problem well enough to include it in games.

Intelligence dissemination management - US Army: Army After Next/Transformation Wargame

  • AAN were not intended to be forecasts, but a way to test concepts. By repeating the games, the plan was to conduct comparative analysis as scenarios and adversaries varied over the long term. In this case, however, it appears that a confrontation with an unpleasant present, rather than the repetitive pull of a coherent vision of the future, was the catalyst providing new direction for Army planning and wargaming.

Intelligence dissemination management - US Air Force: Global Engagement/Aerospace Future Capabilities

  • Air Force experience, early in the gaming process, revealed, as with the other services, a need for a more coherent concept of future challenges. As with the other services, a new doctrinal framework evolved, the Air Force version being Expeditionary Air Forces, therefore, was essential in giving the games purpose and substance.

Intelligence dissemination management - US Air Force: Global Engagement/Aerospace Future Capabilities

  • Expeditionary Air Forces involve new mixed units of different aircraft types, but are not as disruptive as early frameworks that assumed extensive use of space-based systems, UAVs, and extremely long-range operations

Intelligence dissemination management - Millennium Challenge 2002

  • While this game generated considerable political controversy, it is being mentioned here as a reminder of how asymmetrical modern conflict can be, and the challenges that asymmetric thinking can present to intelligence capabilities and assumptions

Intelligence dissemination management - Millennium Challenge 2002

  • A relevant point to this discussion was that by using motorcycle messengers, he neutralized Blue COMINT capabilities

Intelligence dissemination management - Millennium Challenge 2002

  • Van Riper, in a leaked email, said Instead of a free-play, two-sided game … it simply became a scripted exercise. The conduct of the game did not allow for the concepts of rapid decisive operations, effects-based operations, or operational net assessment to be properly assessed. … It was in actuality an exercise that was almost entirely scripted to ensure a Blue 'win.'

Intelligence dissemination management - Millennium Challenge 2002

  • At one point in the game, when Blue's fleet entered the Persian Gulf, he sank some of the ships with suicide-bombers in speed boats

Intelligence dissemination management - Millennium Challenge 2002

  • . While existing shipboard and possibly airborne radars might not have detected the speedboats, there is work in Electro-optical MASINT#Shallow water operations|wake detection with MASINT sensors that might have picked up the boats. Was such a sensor capability being assumed? If there is such a sensor, it would be likely to be highly classified.

Intelligence dissemination management - Millennium Challenge 2002

  • Without exact knowledge of what happened, the situation is not as clear as either side might have it

Intelligence dissemination management - Millennium Challenge 2002

  • In his email about quitting the game, You don't come to a conclusion beforehand and then work your way to that conclusion. You see how the thing plays out. He added, somewhat ominously in retrospect, My main concern was we'd see future forces trying to use these things when they've never been properly grounded in any sort of an experiment.

Intelligence dissemination management - Millennium Challenge 2002

  • Finally, the paper quoted a retired Army officer who has played in several war games with Van Riper

8th arrondissement of Paris

  • According to the 1999 census, it was the place of employment of more people than any other single arrondissement of the capital

8th arrondissement of Paris - Population Density

  • The arrondissement had its highest population of 107,485 in 1891.

8th arrondissement of Paris - Population Density

  • In 2006, with almost a third of that number, (39,088) it was Paris' 16th least densely populated arrondissement with 1.8% of the total.

8th arrondissement of Paris - Economy

  • 40 rue de Courcelles Paris, France 75008 Air China and China Southern Airlines have their Paris offices in the arrondissement.[ http://www.airchina.com/gr/en/customer_service/worldwide_offices/europe.shtml Worldwide offices Europe]

8th arrondissement of Paris - Economy

  • At one time Alcatel-Lucent's head office was located in the arrondissement.[ http://www.alcatel-lucent.com/wps/portal/termsofuse Alcatel-Lucent Website Terms of Use]

8th arrondissement of Paris - Places of interest

  • * Automobile Club de France

8th arrondissement of Paris - Places of interest

  • * Maxim's Art Nouveau Collection 1900|Maxim's Art NouveauCollection 1900

8th arrondissement of Paris - Places of interest

  • * Musée Nissim de Camondo|Musée Nissimde Camondo

8th arrondissement of Paris - Places of interest

  • * Luxor Obelisk|The Obelisk (Obélisque)in the Place de la Concorde

8th arrondissement of Paris - Places of interest

  • * Palais de la Découverte

8th arrondissement of Paris - Places of interest

  • * Pinacothèque de Paris

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