Asus Pirated software and dissemination of confidential data



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Nissen hut - Description

  • At either end the walls are made from a wooden frame with weatherboards nailed to the outside.

Nissen hut - Description

  • Windows and doors may be added to the sides by creating a dormer form by adding a frame to take the upper piece of corrugated iron and replacing the lower piece with a suitable frame for a door or window.

Nissen hut - Description

  • Nissen huts come in three internal spans— 16ft (4.9m), 24ft (7.3m) or 30ft (9.2m). The longitudinal bays come in multiples of 6ft (1.83 m). The corrugated steel half-circles used to build Nissen huts can be stored efficiently, because the curved sheets can be cupped one inside another.

Nissen hut - Description

  • However, there is no standard model of Nissen huts, as the design was never static but changed according to demand.

Nissen hut - History

  • After the third prototype was completed, the design was formalized and the Nissen hut was put into production in August 1916

Nissen hut - History

  • Nissen patented his invention in the UK in 1916 and patents were taken out later in the United States, Canada, South Africa and Australia. Nissen received royalties from the British government, not for huts made during the war, but only for their sale after the conflict. Nissen got some £13,000 and the Distinguished Service Order|DSO (Distinguished Service Order).

Nissen hut - History

Nissen hut - History

  • The Nissen hut was used for a wide range of functions; apart from accommodation, they were used as churches and bomb stores, etc.See Francis 1996, Innes 1998, 2000, Pullar 1997

Nissen hut - History

  • Accounts of life in the hut generally were not positive. Huts in the United Kingdom were frequently seen as cold and draughty, while those in the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific were seen as stuffy and humid.

Nissen hut - History

  • The standard Nissen Hut was often recycled into housing.(McCoash 1997:121-123) A similar approach was taken with the U.S

Nissen hut - History

  • However, the adaptation of the semi-cylindrical hut to non-institutional uses was not popular. Neither the Nissen, nor the Quonset developed into popular housing, despite their low cost. One reason was the association with huts: A hut was not a house, with all the status a house implies. The second point was that rectangular furniture does not fit into a curved wall house very well, and, thus, the actual usable space in a hut might be much less than supposed.

Nissen hut - History

  • In the UK, after the Second World War many were converted to agricultural or other functions, and numerous examples have since been demolished.

Nissen hut - History

  • In Australia, after World War II, the Nissen hut was built at many migrant camps around the country.

Nissen hut - Use as family housing

  • Currently, there are attempts to have the remaining cluster of huts declared as a conservation area,[http://www.nsw.nationaltrust.org.au/e-news/issue42-extended.html Nissen Huts at Belmont] with the objective of assisting in their preservation.

Nissen hut - Use as family housing

  • Also, in two towns an hour's drive from Belmont, at Cessnock, New South Wales|Cessnock and Kurri Kurri in the Hunter Region|Lower Hunter area of NSW, there are some more Nissen hut homes still privately owned and in use as houses. The Hunter Valley area's climate is probably the most suitable for the use of Nissen huts as homes - never below freezing in winter, and yet summer is not too humid.

Florida v. Riley - Justice Brennan's Dissent

  • Justice Brennan, joined by Marshall and Stevens, strongly believed that the plurality had misstated the issue, agreeing with O'Connor that the frequency of public air travel was a necessary consideration, and that the key issue in the case was whether ordinary citizens were normally in the air above the defendant’s home:

Florida v. Riley - Justice Brennan's Dissent

  • :The police officer positioned 400 feet above Riley's backyard was not, however, standing on a public road. The vantage point he enjoyed was not one any citizen could readily share. His ability to see over Riley’s fence depended on his use of a very expensive and sophisticated piece of machinery to which few ordinary citizens have access.

Florida v. Riley - Justice Brennan's Dissent

  • However, Brennan disagreed with O'Connor in that he believed the defendant did not necessarily need to show that public flight was rare, but rather that the state needed to show that it was common:

Florida v. Riley - Justice Brennan's Dissent

  • :Because the State has greater access to information concerning customary flight patterns and because the coercive power of the State ought not be brought to bear in cases in which it is unclear whether the prosecution is a product of an unconstitutional, warrantless search, the burden of proof properly rests with the State and not with the individual defendant. The State quite clearly has not carried this burden.

Florida v. Riley - Justice Blackmun's Dissent

  • Justice Blackmun recognized that five of the nine justices (O'Connor and the four dissenters) had agreed that the reasonableness of Riley's expectation [of privacy] depends, in large measure, on the frequency of non-police helicopter flights at an altitude of 400 feet

Biodistribution - Biodistribution imaging after dissection

  • At intervals of 1, 2, 4, and 24 hours, smaller groups (4-5) of the animals are euthanized, then dissected

Biodistribution - Biodistribution imaging after dissection

  • A useful compound is one that is used either for the medical imaging of certain body parts or tumors (at low doses of radioactivity) or treating tumors (at high doses of radioactivity).


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