Asian cinemas



Download 387.6 Kb.
Date04.06.2017
Size387.6 Kb.
FM2601
ASIAN CINEMAS
Module Booklet for 2014-15




For student completion:

Day



Room



Time



                                                                                            

Module detail




Credits

20

Module leader

Leon Hunt

Assessment

Method             Proportion of marks

2000 word Essay 50%

2000 word Essay 50%               


Assessment Dates

Assignment 1 Thursday March 5th

Assignment 2 Tuesday April 21st

                                                                                                          
Access to support material
Support material is provided electronically via the University’s Blackboard Learn system. You can gain access to the Blackboard Learn system via the following web page:


  • https://blackboard.brunel.ac.uk/


                                                                                                          
Introduction/aims/background
MAIN AIMS OF THE MODULE


  • To examine a range of Asian cinemas in their cultural and industrial contexts.




  • To consider how selected Asian cinema circulate globally as art cinema, genre cinema and popular or cult cinema.




  • To examine critical debates surrounding global and transnational cinema.




  • To develop critical skills in the contextual and formal analysis of films from selected Asian film industries.


                                                                                                          
Learning outcomes
There are learning outcomes that you must achieve in order to be awarded the credits for this module.  These learning outcomes are listed below:-


  1. Knowledge and Understanding of:




  • Some of the key developments, trends and aesthetic traditions within selected Asian cinemas.




  • Relevant cultural and industrial contexts for the films examined on the module.




  • Debates surrounding the study of national, international and transnational cinema.




  • Critical and theoretical frameworks within which Asian filmmaking can be understood: as Art cinema, commercial/popular cinema and genre cinema.




  • Key ‘movements’, historical moments and filmmakers in Asian cinema.




  • ‘Asia’ and ‘Asian cinema(s)’ as conceptual constructs.

(B) Cognitive (thinking) Skills




  • Demonstrate analytical skills appropriate to formal and aesthetic qualities of Asian filmmaking practices.




  • Demonstrate an ability to locate texts within a variety or relevant contexts.




  • Apply and engage critically with scholarly sources relevant to the study of Asian cinema.




  • Skills in synthesising primary and secondary sources in written work.

(C) Other Skills and Attributes (Practical/Professional/Transferable)




  • Effective skills in structuring and communicating ideas in written work.




  • Skills in independent study and independent critical thought.




  • Skills in research and time management.

 

                                                                                                          


Personal and Key Skills


These are skills that are valued by employers and will help you in your personal and career development after graduating from Brunel:

Team working – working with others in seminars or on set tasks to develop your ideas and create a piece of work like a group presentation or seminar contribution.


Planning and time management – organizing your study time, prioritizing your reading and seminar planning, working with your timetable and preparing to present your work on time.


Independent study and initiative – working on your own and thinking ahead. Identifying solutions to problems by applying your own initiative, and being proactive (closely related to research).


Research – reading from the reading list and exploring the world of the text from appropriate sources e.g. historical texts, interviews, web searches. Using your initiative to extend your study and preparation beyond that set down by module information or course tutor.


Live presentation in front of an audience – preparing a presentation in class if set by tutor/module requirements. Using Powerpoint and speaking to slides in a confident and precise manner. Developing the confidence to present your ideas coherently and cogently to other people verbally.



Method of teaching


  • Screenings

  • Lectures

  • Seminars

  • Tutorials



                                                                                                          
Teaching Programme
TERM 2



16

05/01/2015

to

09/01/2015

Reading Week

17

12/01/2015

to

16/01/2015

Japan & the Emergence of Asian Art Cinema

18

19/01/2015

to

23/01/2015

Chinese Art Cinema: The ‘Fifth Generation’

19

26/01/2015

to

30/01/2015

Contemporary Art Cinema

20

02/02/2015

to

06/02/2015

Hindi Action Cinema

21

09/02/2015

to

13/02/2015

Hindi Action Cinema (continued)

22

16/02/2015

to

20/02/2015

Martial Arts and Trans-Asian Action Cinema

23

23/02/2015

to

27/02/2015

From Kaiju Eiga to the Korean Wave: Monster Movies

24

02/03/2015

to

06/03/2015

‘Asia Extreme’ and Asian Cult Cinema

25

09/03/2015

to

13/03/2015

Transnational Stardom: Jet Li

26

16/03/2015

to

20/03/2015

Anime and the Japanese Blockbuster

27

23/03/2015

to

27/03/2015

Bollywood after 'Bollywood'


Week One

Lecture: Japan and the Emergence of Asian Art Cinema

Screening: Rashomon (Kurosawa Akira, Japan 1950)

Recommended Viewing: Seven Samurai (Kurosawa, Japan 1954), Throne of Blood (Kurosawa, Japan 1957), Yojimbo (Kurosawa, Japan 1961), Late Spring (Ozu Yasujiro, Japan 1949), Early Summer (Ozu, Japan 1951), Tokyo Story (Ozu, Japan 1953), Ugetsu Monogatari (Mizoguchi Kenji, Japan 1953), Sansho-Dayu (Mizoguchi, Japan 1954), Street of Shame (Mizoguchi, Japan 1956).

Reading:

  • Anne T. Ciecko, ‘Theorizing Asian Cinema(s)’ in Contemporary Asian Cinema, ed. Anne T. Ciecko, Berg 2006.

  • Stephen Crofts, ‘Concepts of National Cinema’ in The Oxford Guide to Film Studies, ed. John Hill and Pamela Church Gibson, Oxford University Press 1998.

  • Mitsuhiro Yoshitomo, ‘Kurosawa Criticism and the Name of the Author’ in Kurosawa: Film Studies and Japanese Cinema, Duke University Press 2000

Further Reading:

  • David Desser, ‘Remaking Seven Samurai in World Cinema’ in East Asian Cinemas: Exploring Transnational Connections on Film, ed. Leon Hunt and Leung Wing-Fai, I.B. Tauris 2008.

  • Gary Needham, ‘Japanese Cinema and Orientalism’ in Asian Cinemas: A Reader and Guide, ed. Gary Needham and Dimitris Eleftheriotis, Edinburgh University Press 2006.

  • Donald Richie, The Films of Akira Kurosawa, University of California Press 1996.

  • Stephen Prince, The Warrior’s Camera: The Cinema of Akira Kurosawa, Princeton University Press 1999.


Week Two

Lecture: Chinese Art Cinema: The ‘Fifth Generation’

Screening: Ju Dou (Zhang Yimou, China 1990)

Recommended viewing: Red Sorghum (Zhang Yimou, China 1987), Raise the Red Lantern (Zhang Yimou, China 1991),The Story of Qiu Ju (Zhang Yimou, China 1990), Farewell My Concubine (Chen Kaige, China 1993).

Reading:

  • Wendy Larson, ‘The Fifth Generation: A Reassessment’ in The Chinese Cinema Book, ed. Song Hwee Lim and Julian Ward, BFI/Palgrave 2011.

  • Esther C.M. Yau, ‘Yellow Earth: Western Analysis and a Non-Western Texts’ in Asian Cinemas: A Reader and Guide, ed. Gary Needham and Dimitris Eleftheriotis.

  • Sheldon Hsiao-peng Lu, ‘National Cinema, Cultural Critique, Transnational Capital: The Films of Zhang Yimou’ in Transnational Chinese Cinema: Identity, Nationhood, Gender, ed. Sheldon Hsiao-peng Lu, University of Hawaii Press 1997.

Further Reading:

  • Haomin Gong, ‘Zhang Yimou’ in Fifty Contemporary Filmmakers, ed. Yvonne Tasker, Routledge 2011.

  • Rey Chow, ‘The Force of Surfaces: Defiance in Zhang Yimou’s Films’ in Primitive Passions: Visuality, Sexuality, Ethnography and Contemporary Chinese Cinema, Columbia University Press 1995.

  • Shuqin Cui, ‘Gendered Perspective: The Construction and Representation of Subjectivity and Sexuality in Ju Dou’ in Transnational Chinese Cinema: Identity, Nationhood, Gender, ed. Sheldon Hsiao-peng Lu, University of Hawaii Press 1997.

  • Dimitris Eleftheriotis, ‘Cross-Cultural Criticism and Chinese Cinema’ in Asian Cinemas: A Reader and Guide, ed. Needham and Eleftheriotis.

  • Yingjin Zhang, Chinese National Cinema, Routledge 2004 – ‘The PRC – Post-Socialist Cinema’.


Week Three

Lecture: Contemporary Art Cinema

Screening: Hani-Bi (Kitano Takeshi, Japan 1998)

Recommended viewing: Violent Cop (Kitano, Japan 1989), Sonatine (Kitano, Japan 1993), Zatoichi (Kitano, Japan 2003).

Reading:

  • Darrell William Davis, ‘Therapy for Him and Her: Kitano Takeshi's Hana-Bi’ in Japanese Cinema: Texts and Contexts, ed. Alastair Philips and Julian Stringer, Routledge 2007

  • Darrell William Davis, ‘Re-igniting Japanese Tradition with Hana-bi’, Cinema Journal 40.4 (Summer 2001).

  • Steve Neale, ‘Art Cinema as Institution’, Screen 22.1 (1981).

Further reading:

  • Aaron Gerow, Kitano Takeshi, London: London: BFI 2007.

  • Dan Edwards, ‘Never Yielding Entirely into Art: Performance and Self-Obsession in Takeshi Kitano’s Hana-Bi’, Senses of Cinema 10 (2000) http://sensesofcinema.com/2000/10/hanabi/

  • (There are also 4 other articles on Kitano in Senses of Cinema 10)

  • Donald Totaro, ‘Violent Cop’ in Justin Bowyer (ed) The Cinema of Japan and Korea, Wallflower 2005.

  • David Bordwell, 'The Art Cinema as a Mode of Film Practice', Film Criticism 14.1 (1979).



Week Four

Lecture: Cinema of Interruptions? Hindi Action Cinema

Screening: Sholay (Ramesh Sippy, India 1975) – Part 1

Recommended viewing: Satya (Ram Gopal Varma, India 1998), Zanjeer (Prakash Mehra, India 1973), Muquaddar Ka Sikandar (Prakash Mehra, India 1978).

Reading:

  • Rosie Thomas, ‘Indian Cinema: Pleasures and Popularity’ in The Bollywood Reader, ed. Rajinder Dudrah and Jigna Desai, Open University Press 2008.

  • Tejaswini Ganti, ‘The Production and Distribution of Popular Hindi Cinema’ in Bollywood: A Guidebook to Popular Hindi Cinema, Routledge 2004.

  • Lalitha Gopalan, ‘Introduction: ‘Hum Aapke Hain Koun?’ – Cinephilia and Indian Films’ in Cinema of Interruptions: Action Genres in Contemporary Indian Cinema, Palgrave Macmillan 2001.

Further Reading:

  • Vijay Mishra, ‘The Actor as Parallel Text: Amitabh Bachchan’ in Bollywood Cinema: Temples of Desire, Routledge 2002.

  • Vijay Mishra, ‘Towards a Theoretical Critique of Bombay Cinema’ in The Bollywood Reader, ed. Rajinder Dudrah and Jigna Desai.

  • Sarfraz Manzoor, ‘How Amitabh Bachchan United Generations of British Asians’, The Guardian October 25th, http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2012/oct/25/amitabh-bachchan-british-asians-bollywood.

  • Valentina Vitali, ‘The 1970s’ in Hindi Action Cinema, Indiana University Press 2008.

  • Dmitris Eleftheriotis, ‘Genre Criticism and Popular Indian Cinema’ in Asian Cinemas: A Reader and Guide, ed. Needham and Eleftheriotis.

  • Rachel Dwyer and Divia Patel, Cinema India: The Visual Culture of Hindi Film (Reaktion Books 2002)

  • Sangita Gopal and Biswarup Sen, ‘Inside and Out: Song and Dance in Bollywood Cinema’ in The Bollywood Reader.



Week Five

No Lecture – Seminar only

Screening: Sholay (Ramesh Sippy, India 1975) – Part 2

Reading – as last week


Week Six

Lecture: Action as Contact Zone: Martial Arts and Trans-Asian Cinema

Screening: The Raid (Gareth Evans, Indonesia/US 2011)

Recommended viewing: Tom Yum Goong/The Warrior King (Prachya Pinkaew, Thailand 2005), Ong-Bak (Prachya Pinkaew, Thailand 2003), Police Story (Jackie Chan, HK 1985), Hard Boiled (John Woo, HK 1992).

Reading:

  • Krishna Sen, ‘Indonesia: Screening a Nation in the Post-New Order’ in Contemporary Asian Cinema, ed. Anne Tereska Ciecko, Berg 2006.

  • Leon Hunt, ‘Ong-Bak: New Thai Cinema, Hong Kong and the Cult of the Real’, New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film 3, 2.

  • Valentina Vitali, ‘Hong Kong-Hollywood-Bombay: On the Function of “Martial Art” in the Hindi Action Cinema’ in Hong Kong Connections: Transnational Imagination in Action Cinema, ed. Meaghan Morris, Siu Leung Li and Stephen Chan Ching-kiu, Duke University Press/HK University Press 2005.

Further Reading:

  • Leon Hunt, Kung Fu Cult Masters – ch.2.

  • Anchalee Chaiworaporn and Adam Knee, ‘Thailand: Revival in an Age of Globalization’ in Anne T. Ciecko (ed) Contemporary Asian Cinema.

  • Glen Lewis, ‘The Thai Movie Revival and Thai National Identity’, Continuum 17, 1.

  • Ding-Tzan Lii, ‘A Colonized Empire: Reflections on the Expansion of Hong Kong Cinema is Asian Countries’ in Kuan-hsing Chen (ed) Trajectories: Inter-Asian Cultural Studies (Routledge 1998).

  • Kim Soyoung, ‘Genre as Contact Zone: Hong Kong Action and Korean Hwalkuk’ in Hong Kong Connections, ed. Morris, Li and Chan.

  • S.R. Srivinas, ‘Hong Kong Action Film and the Career of the Telugu Mass Hero’ in Hong Kong Connections.

  • Kinnia Yau Shuk-ting, ‘Interactions Between Japanese and Hong Kong Action Cinemas’ in Hong Kong Connections.

Week Seven

Lecture: From Kaiju Eiga to the ‘Korean Wave’: Godzilla and Other Monsters

Screening: The Host (Bong Joon-ho, South Korea 2006)

Recommended viewing: Gojira/Godzilla (Honda Ishiro, Japan 1954), any other Godzilla film (or alternatively, his Japanese rival Gamera)

Reading:

  • William M. Tsutsui and Michiko Ito (eds) In Godzilla’s Footsteps: Japanese Pop Culture Icons on the Global Stage (Palgrave Macmillan 2006) – particularly essays 3, 4 and 5.

  • Chon A. Noriega, ‘Godzilla and the Japanese Nightmare: When Them! Is U.S.’ in Asian Cinemas: A Reader and Guide, ed. Needham and Eleftheriotis

  • Philip Brophy, ‘Monster Island: Godzilla and Japanese Sci-Fi/Horror/Fantasy’ in Asian Cinemas: A Reader and Guide.

Further reading:

  • Kyung Hyun Kim, ‘Virtual Landscapes: Sopyonje, The Power of Kangwon Province, and The Host’ in Virtual Hallyu: Korean Cinema of the Global Era, Duke University Press 2011 – especially pp. 42-51.

  • David Desser, ‘Consuming Asia: Chinese and Japanese Popular Culture and the American Imaginary’ in Jenny Kwok Wah Lau (ed) Multiple Modernities: Cinema and Popular Media in Transnational East Asia (Temple University Press 2003)

  • Samara Lea Allsop, ‘Gojira/Godzilla’ in Justin Bowyer (ed) The Cinema of Japan and Korea (Wallflower Press 2004.)

  • Ken Hollings, ‘Godzilla, Mon Amour’, Sight and Sound July 1998 pp.20-23.

  • Darcy Paquet, New Korean Cinema: Breaking the Waves, Wallflower 2009.

  • Hyangjin Lee, ‘South Korea: Film on the Global Stage’ in Anne T. Ciecko (ed) Contemporary Asian Cinema

  • Susan Sontag, ‘The Imagination of Disaster’ in Gerald Mast and Marshall Cohen, Film Theory and Criticism (Oxford University Press 1985)


Week Eight

Lecture: ‘Asia Extreme’ and Asian Cult Cinema

Screening: Oldboy (Park Chan-wook, South Korea 2004)

Recommended viewing: JSA/Joint Security Area (Park Chan-wook, South Korea 2000), Sympathy for Mr Vengeance (Park, South Korea 2002), Sympathy for Lady Vengeance (Park, South Korea 2005), Ichi the Killer (Miike Takashi, Japan 2001), Battle Royale (Fukasaku Kinji, Japan 2001), Three … Extremes (Miike Takashi, Park Chan-wook, Fruit Chan, Japan/South Korea/Hong Kong 2004). 

  • Oliver Dew, ‘Asia Extreme: Japanese Cinema and British Hype’, New Cinemas 5:11, April 2007.

  • Chi-yun Shin, ‘Art of Branding: Tartan “Asia Extreme” films’, Jump Cut 50, Spring 2008. http://www.ejumpcut.org/archive/jc50.2008/TartanDist/text.html.

  • Nikki J.Y. Lee, ‘Oldboy Goes Mainstream? Birth of a Cult Director?’ in Leon Hunt and Leung Wing-fai (eds) East Asian Cinemas: Transnational Perspectives, I.B. Tauris, forthcoming 2008.

Further Reading:

  • Kyung Hyun Kim, ‘Park Chan-wook’s “Unknowable” Oldboy’ in Virtual Hallyu: Korean Cinema of the Global Era, Duke University Press 2011.

  • Anne T. Ciecko and Hunju Lee, ‘Park Chan-wook’ in Fifty Contemporary Filmmakers, Routledge 2011.

  • Steven Rawle, ‘From The Black Society to The Isle: Miike Takashi and Kim Ki-Duk at the intersection of Asia Extreme’, Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema 1.2 (December 2009).

  • Earl Jackson Jnr., ‘Borrowing trouble: Oldboy as adaptation and intervention’, Transnational Cinemas 3.1 (May 2012).

  • Hyangjin Lee, ‘South Korea: Film on the Global Stage’ in Anne T. Ciecko (ed) Contemporary Asian Cinema (Berg 2006).

  • Soyoung Kim, ‘Cine-Mania or Cinephilia: Film Festivals and the Identity Question’ and Kyu Hyun Kim, ‘Horror as Critique in Tell Me Something and Sympathy for Mr Vengeance in Chi-Yun Shin and Julian Stringer (eds) New Korean Cinema (Edinburgh University Press 2005).

  • Tony Rayns, ‘Suspicious Minds’, Sight and Sound, September 2004.

  • Tony Rayns, ‘Shock Tactics’, Sight and Sound May 2005,

  • Grady Hendrix, ‘Vengeance is Theirs’, Sight and Sound, February 2006.

  • Gary Needham, ‘Japanese Cinema and Orientalism’ in Needham and Dimitris Eleftheriotis (eds) Asian Cinemas: A Reader and Guide (Edinburgh University Press 2006).

  • Charles Leary and Chua Beng Huat, ‘Introduction: Violence in Contemporary Asian Cinemas’, New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film 8.3 (January 2011).

  • Darrell William Davis, ‘Japan: Cause for (Cautious) Optimism’ in Anne T. Ciecko (ed) Contemporary Asian Cinema (Berg 2006).

  • Tom Mes, Agitator: The Cinema of Takashi Miike (FAB Press 2003) pp.228-43.

  • Tony Williams, ‘Case-Study: Battle Royale’s Apocalyptic Millennial Warning’ in Jay McRoy (ed) Japanese Horror Cinema (Edinburgh University Press 2005)

  • Matt Hills, ‘Ringing the Changes: Cult Distinctions and Cultural Differences in US Fans’ Readings of Japanese Horror Cinema’ in McRoy (ed) Japanese Horror Cinema.

  • Anthony Antoniou, ‘Batoru Rowaiaru/Battle Royale’ in Justin Bowyer (ed) The Cinema of Japan and Korea (Wallflower 2004)

  • Julian Stringer, ‘Problems with the Treatment of Hong Kong Cinema as Camp’, Asian Cinema, vol.8 no.2.



Week Nine

Lecture: Transnational Stardom – Jet Li

Screening: Fearless (Ronny Yu, HK/China 2005)

Recommended viewing: Hero (Zhang Yimou, China/HK/US 2002), The Warlords (Peter Chan Ho-sun, HK/China 2007), Once Upon a Time in China (Tsui Hark, HK 1991), Once Upon a Time in China 2 (Tsui Hark, HK 1992),Once Upon a Time in China III (Tsui Hark, HK 1993), Fist of Legend (Gordon Chan, HK 1994), Unleashed/Danny the Dog (Louis Leterrier, France/US/UK 2005), The Forbidden Kingdom (Rob Minkoff, US/China 2008).

Reading:

  • Sabrina Qiong Yu, Jet Li: Chinese Masculinity and Transnational Film Stardom, Edinburgh University Press 2012 – ch.’s 1, 5 and 7.

  • Leon Hunt, Kung Fu Cult Masters: From Bruce Lee to Crouching Tiger, Wallflower Press 2003 – ch.’s 6 and 7.

  • Sabrina Yu, ‘Jet Li: Star Construction and Fan Discourse on the Internet’ in Chinese Film Stars, ed. Mary Farquhar and Yingjin Zhang, Routledge 2010.

Further reading:

  • Leon Hunt, ‘Dragons Forever: Chinese Martial Arts Stars’ in The Chinese Cinema Book, ed. Song Hwee Lim and Julian Ward, BFI/Palgrave Macmillan 2011.

  • Mary Farquhar, ‘Jet Li: Wushu Master’ in Celebrity in China, ed. L. Edwards and M. Farquhar, Hong Kong University Press 2010.

  • Barna William Donovan, ‘Jet Li: The Noble Warrior’ in The Asian Influence on Hollywood Action Films, McFarland 2008.

  • Steve Fore, ‘Jackie Chan and the Cultural Dynamics of Global Entertainment’ in Transnational Chinese Cinemas: Identity, Nationhood, Gender, ed. Sheldon Hsiao-peng Lu

  • Steve Fore, ‘Life Imitates Entertainent: Home and Dislocation in the Films of Jackie Chan’ in At Full Speed, ed. Esther Yau, University of Minnesota Press 2001.

  • Mark Gallagher, ‘Masculinity in Translation: Jackie Chan’s Transcultural Star Text’, Velvet Light Trap, 39, Spring 1997

  • Leon Hunt, ‘Once Upon a Time in China: Kung Fu from Bruce Lee to Jet Li’, Framework 40, April 1999.

  • Mary Farquhar, ‘ Jackie Chan: Star Work as Pain and Triumph’ in Chinese Film Stars, ed. M. Farquhar, Y. Zhang, Routledge 2010.

.

Week Ten

Lecture: Anime and the Japanese Blockbuster

Screening: Spirited Away (Miyazaki Hayao, Japan 2001)

Further viewing: My Neighbour Totoro (Miyazaki, Japan 1988), Princess Mononoke (Miyazaki, Japan 1997), Kiki’s Delivery Service (Miyazaki, Japan 1989), Howl’s Moving Castle (Miyazaki, Japan 2004), Ponyo (Miyazaki, 2008).

  • Rayna Denison, ‘The Language of the Blockbuster: Promotion, Princess Mononoke and the Daihitto in Japanese Film Culture’ in East Asian Cinemas: Exploring Transnational Connections on Film, ed. Leon Hunt and Leung Wing-Fai.

  • Rayna Denison, ‘The Global Markets for Anime: Miyazaki Hayao's Spirited Away’ in Japanese Cinema: Texts and Contexts.

  • Andrew Osmond, Spirited Away, BFI 2008.

Further Reading:

  • Rayna Denison, ‘Hayao Miyazaki’ in Fifty Contemporary Filmmakers, ed. Yvonne Tasker, Routledge 2011.

  • Susan Napier, Anime From Akira to Princess Mononoke: Experiencing Contemporary Japanese Animation, Houndmills and New York: Palgrave 2001

  • Susan Napier, From Impressionism to Anime: Japan as Fantasy and Fan Cult in the Mind of the West, Palgrave 2007.

  • Chris Berry, ‘”What’s Big About the Big Film?”: De-Westernising the Blockbuster in Korea and China’ in Movie Blockbusters, ed. Julian Stringer, Routledge 2003.



Week Eleven

Lecture: Bollywood after 'Bollywood' - re-thinking the Indian Blockbuster

Screening: Gangs of Wasseypur (Anurag Kashyap, India 2010)

Recommended viewing: Satya (Ram Gopal Varma, India 1998), Bombay (Mani Ratnam, India 1995), Roja (Mani Ratnam, India 1992), Dil Se (Mani Ratnam, India 1998)

Reading:

  • Dmitris Eleftheriotis, ‘Genre Criticism and Popular Indian Cinema’ in Asian Cinemas: A Reader and Guide, ed. Needham and Eleftheriotis.

  • Phil Hoad, ‘Why Aren’t More Bollywood Films Marketed in English?’, The Guardian (October 23rd 2012) http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2012/oct/23/why-arent-bollywood-films-marketed-english

  • Nitin Govil, ‘Bollywood and the Frictions of Global Mobility’ in The Bollywood Reader.

  • Ashish Rajadhyaksha, ‘The ‘Bollywoodization’ of the Indian Cinema: Cultural Nationalism in a Global Arena’ in The Bollywood Reader, ed. Dudrah and Desai.

Further Reading:

  • Sudhanva Deshpande, 'The Consumable Hero of Globalised India' in Bollywood: Popular Indian Cinema Through a Transnational Lens, ed. Raminder Kaur and Ajay J. Sinha (eds) (New Delhi: Sage 2005).

  • Vijay Mishra, ‘After Ayodhya: The Sublime Object of Fundamentalism’ in Bollywood Cinema: Temples of Desire.

  • Lalitha Gopalan, ‘Screening the Past in Mani Ratnam’s Nakayan’ in Cinema of Interruptions.

  • Lalitha Gopalan, Bombay, BFI Modern Classics 2005.

  • Nicholas B. Dirks, ‘The Home and the Nation: Consuming Culture and Politics in Roja’ in The Bollywood Reader, ed. Dudrah and Desai.



Brunel University

Generic Undergraduate Grade Descriptors


Grade A*


Clearly demonstrates a highly sophisticated, critical and thorough understanding of the topic. Provides clear evidence of originality and independence of thought and clearly demonstrates exceptional ability to develop a highly systematic and logical or insightful argument, solution or evaluation at the current Level. Demonstrates exceptional ability in the appropriate use of the relevant literature, theory, methodologies, practices, tools, etc., to analyse and synthesise at the current Level. Shows an exceptionally high level of clarity, focus and cogency in communication at the current Level.

Grade Band A (A+, A, A-)


Clearly demonstrates a sophisticated, critical and thorough understanding of the topic. Provides evidence of independence of thought and clearly demonstrates the ability to develop a highly systematic and logical or insightful argument, solution or evaluation at the current Level. Demonstrates excellence in the appropriate use of the relevant literature, theory, methodologies, practices, tools, etc., to analyse and synthesise at the current Level. Shows a high level of clarity, focus and cogency in communication at the current Level.

Grade Band B (B+, B, B-)


Clearly demonstrates a well-developed, critical and comprehensive understanding of the topic. Provides some evidence of independence of thought and clearly demonstrates the ability to develop a systematic and logical or insightful argument, solution or evaluation at the current Level. Demonstrates a high degree of competence in the appropriate use of the relevant literature, theory, methodologies, practices, tools, etc., to analyse and synthesise at the current Level. Shows clarity, focus and cogency in communication at the current Level.

Grade Band C (C+, C, C-)


Demonstrates a systematic and substantial understanding of the topic. Demonstrates the ability to develop a systematic argument or solution at the current Level. Demonstrates a significant degree of competence in the appropriate use of the relevant literature, theory, methodologies, practices, tools, etc., to analyse and synthesise at the current Level. Provides evidence of clarity and focus in communication at the current Level.

Grade Band D (D+, D, D-)


Provides evidence of a systematic understanding of the key aspects of the topic. Demonstrates the ability to present a sufficiently structured argument or solution at the current Level. Demonstrates an acceptable degree of competence in the appropriate use of the relevant literature, theory, methodologies, practices, tools, etc., to analyse and synthesise at the current Level. Provides evidence of effective communication at the current Level.

Grade Band E (E+, E, E-)


Provides evidence of some understanding of key aspects of the topic and some ability to present an appropriate argument or solution at the current Level. Demonstrates some competence in the appropriate use of the relevant literature, theory, methodologies, practices, tools, etc at the current Level. Provides some evidence of effective communication at the current Level. However, there is also evidence of deficiencies which mean that the threshold standard (D-) has not been met.

Grade F


Work that is unacceptable.

                                                                                                    
Assessment
Two pieces of coursework - 50% each.

Assignment 1 – due Thursday March 5th
Write an analysis of 2000 words of one film from one of the national cinemas studied on the module. Your analysis should include consideration of the following:


  • The relevant national/cultural/historical context of the film.

  • The film’s place either within its genre(s) or as a type of Art Cinema.


Assignment 2 – due Tuesday April 21st

Choose one of the following and write an essay of 2000 words.




  1. With reference to 2-3 films, discuss the proposition that all art cinema is also commercial cinema.

  2. With reference to one Asian filmmaker, discuss the importance of authorship in the promotion and reception of national cinema.

  3. In what ways can Kurosawa be considered one of the first transnational Asian filmmakers.

  4. To what extent can martial arts action be seen as a ‘contact zone’ for different Asian national cinemas? You should refer to 2-3 films.

  5. Comparing The Host with at least one Japanese monster movie, discuss how the figure of the monster functions within national and/or historical contexts.

  6. How useful is Lalitha Gopalan’s idea of a ‘Cinema of Interruptions’ in accounting for the pleasures of popular Hindi cinema?

  7. Compare two different examples (from two different Asian national cinemas) of what can be seen as ‘Blockbusters’. What does each suggest about its respective industry and its international reputation?

  8. According to David Desser, the influence of East and West does not go in one direction but ‘back and forth … popular culture circulates, available for both producers and consumers to mediate, extend, rework, rethink, reinvent’. Discuss with reference to 2-3 relevant films.

  9. Rayna Denison suggests that Miyazaki is as much a ‘global brand’ for Studio Ghibli as auteur filmmaker. Discuss.

  10. In what ways can the ‘Asia Extreme’ label be seen to have extended the audience for Asian cinema at the expense of fostering a misleading image of particular Asian film industries?

  11. ‘In contrast with the cinemas of Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea, Indian popular cinema has largely failed to extend its audience beyond a national and diasporic one’. Discuss.

  12. Critically discuss the career of ONE transnational Asian star. Your answer should not simply provide a career overview but analyse how their persona has been shaped and/or received in different cultural contexts.


                                                                                                          
How the assessment relates to the learning outcomes
Assessment criteria:
A good assignment will:

  • address the question and keep it central to the essay’s argument.

  • demonstrate an understanding of and engagement with theories and debates relevant to the study of Asian films.

  • combine skills in textual analysis with appropriate contextual material.

  • show evidence of reading and viewing beyond material covered in class, including use of journals and other research materials held in the University libraries or in the BFI, or on the Internet.

  • engage with the reading rather than simply restating it, both by applying it to selected texts and by offering views and arguments on the reading material.

  • demonstrate an effective synthesis of materials in constructing the assignment - selection of primary materials, textual analysis, critical debates and individual argument.

  • be well structured and focused, with a coherent and persuasive argument backed up by appropriate research, reading and viewing.

  • be clearly expressed and presented, with an appropriate standard of spelling, punctuation, grammar and referencing for honours level work.


                                                                                                        

How the assessment relates to the learning outcomes
Assignment 1 requires students to:


  • Demonstrate an understanding of relevant debates surrounding selected Asian national cinemas through the analysis of an individual film.

  • Demonstrate an awareness of the cultural and generic context of the chosen film

  • Demonstrate a familiarity with a range of secondary critical sources.

  • Demonstrate skills in textual analysis.

Assignment 2 requires students to:



  • Demonstrate an understanding of key debates surrounding the study of selected Asian cinemas.

  • Critically engage with relevant theoretical ideas and sources.

  • Demonstrate an independent selection and use of secondary materials.

  • Demonstrate skills in textual analysis alongside cultural and historical contextualisation.


                                                                                                          
Assessment Criteria


Indicative Mark Band

Degree class equivalent

Grade

Grade Point

90 and above

1

A++

17

80-89

1

A+

16

73-79

1

A

15

70-72

1

A-

14

68-69

2.1

B+

13

63-67

2.1

B

12

60-62

2.1

B-

11

58-59

2.2

C+

10

53-57

2.2

C

9

50-52

2.2

C-

8

48-49

3

D+

7

43-47

3

D

6

40-42

3

D-

5

38-39

Fail

E+

4

33-37

Fail

E

3

30-32

Fail

E-

2

29 and below

Fail

F

1

Non submission

Fail

F

0

                                                                                                          
Submitting your work
In order to be marked without penalty for lateness, work must always be handed in before 3.00 p.m, on the day it is due, hard copy to Gaskell Building and Electronic copy to Blackboard Learn.
It should be submitted with an official cover sheet (available in the foyer of the Gaskell Building).
The assignment and the attached cover sheet should be “posted” in the appropriate coursework collection box in the foyer of the Gaskell Building.
You must add your student number to the top of every page of your work.
You must NOT write your name on the pages of your work.
ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF COURSEWORK:

You are also required to submit an electronic copy of every piece of work submitted. This electronic version must be submitted by 3.pm on the day of the deadline.



Your work is to be submitted through Blackboard Learn. In order to submit work, you need to click on Assignments on the left hand side of the Module page and follow these instructions:-

  1. Click on the Assignment button on the left hand side of the page.



  1. then select the correct coursework you want to submit for; and scroll down to Add Attachment – click into this.



  1. This will take you into a Browse screen, then double click on my computer and this will take you into your computer files then you can select the c/work you want to attach. Now double click your work and this will place it underneath the box for attachments, once you are sure this is the correct piece, then press SUBMIT – there is no need to add any comments. You will now have successfully submitted your coursework on to Blackboard Learn.


Email submissions direct to the module leader are NOT acceptable
Disable HTML Creator
If work is submitted late, the following penalties will be uniformly applied, in the absence of accepted relevant mitigating circumstances:

  • Up to 1 working day late Mark capped at 70%

  • Up to 2 working days late Mark capped at 60%;

  • Up to 5 working days late Mark capped at 50%;

  • Up to 10 working days late Mark capped at 40%;

  • Up to 15 working days late Mark capped at 30%;

  • More than 15 working days late Mark capped at 0%.

A working day is defined as Monday to Friday at any time of year, with the exception of UK national holidays.
Mitigating circumstances are serious factors that explain why you are unable to meet a deadline. For example, serious illness or death of a close relative. Please refer to the College handbook for further details.

                                                                                                          
Feedback on your work
Academic staff aim to mark work and provide detailed and constructive feedback, normally within three weeks of the hand-in date. However, there may be delays. An example Feedback Sheet is at the back of this Module Booklet.
                                                                                                          
Plagiarism
Plagiarism is passing off ideas words, illustrations, ideas or other materials created by someone else as being one’s own ideas or words. The following penalties currently operate:


First offences for undergraduate students

a mark of zero is assigned to the piece of work in question and to the associated module; a reassessment may be awarded where permitted under the Regulations, but for the achievement of credit only; the zero in the module may not be set aside, condoned for credit or, in modules above level 1, excluded from any calculation for the classification of an award.

Repeat offences for undergraduate students

a mark of zero is assigned to the piece of work in question and to the associated module; the student shall be expelled from the University and barred from re-entry; any credits already achieved will be retained and an intermediate award may be awarded as appropriate, unless the Panel determines that there is just cause to deprive the student of any credits already achieved and any intermediate award to which they may lead.


                                                                                                          
Referencing

You should use the Harvard method of referencing – name, year and page number in brackets i.e. (Bordwell 2003: 67). When referencing essays from edited collections, the bracketed citation should give the name of the author(s) of the essay, not the editor(s) of the book.


                                                                                                          
Core reading list
Anne Tereska Ciecko (ed) Contemporary Asian Cinema (Oxford and New YorK; Berg 2006)
Dimitris Eleftheriotis and Gary Needham (ed) Asian Cinemas: A Reader and Guide (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press 2006)
Leon Hunt and Leung Wing-fai (eds) East Asian Cinemas: Exploring Transnational Connections on Film (Lobdon and New York: I.B. Tauris 2008)
Jenny Kwok Wah Lau (ed) (2003) Multiple Modernities: Cinema and Popular Media in Transcultural Asia, (Philadelphia: Temple University Press).
Vivian P.Y. Lee, East Asian Cinemas: Regional Flows and Global Transformations (New York and Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan 2011)
                                                                                                          
Secondary Reading
Jinsoo An (2001) ‘The Killer: Cult film and Transcultural (Mis)Reading’ in Yau, Esther (ed) At Full Speed: Hong Kong Cinema in a Borderless World, ed. Esther Yau (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press).
Arjun Appaduri (ed) Globalization (Durham NC: Duke University Press 2003).
Colette Balmain, Introduction to Japanese Horror Film (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press 2008)
Chris Berry (ed), Chinese Films in Focus: 25 New Takes (London: BFI 2003)
Chris Berry (ed), Perspectives on Chinese Cinema, (London: BFI 1991)
David Bordwell, Planet Hong Kong: Popular Cinema and the Art of Entertainment, (Harvard: Harvard University Press 2003)
Justin Bowyer (ed) The Cinema of Japan and Korea, (London: Wallflower 2005).
Nick Browne, Paul G. Pickowitz, Vivian Sobchack and Esther Yau (eds), New Chinese Cinemas: Forms, Identities, Politics, (Cambridge University Press 1996)
Jonathan Clements, Anime: A History (London: BFI 2013)
Rachel Dwyer, 100 Bollywood Films (London: BFI 2005)
Rachel Dwyer and Divia Patel, Cinema India: The Visual Culture of Hindi Film (Reaktion Books 2002)
Kate Egan and Sarah Thomas (eds) Cult Film Stardom: Offbeat Attractions and the Processes of Cultification (London and New York: Palgrave Macmillian 2012)
Elizabeth Ezra and Terry Rowden (eds) Transnational Cinema: A Film Reader (London: Routledge 2006)
Mary Farquhar and Yingjin Zhang (eds) Chinese Film Stars (London and New York: Routledge 2010).
Tejanswini Ganti, Bollywood: A Guide to Popular Hindi Cinema (London: Routledge 2004)
Aaron Gerow, Kitano Takeshi (London: London: BFI 2007)
Lalitha Gopalan, Cinema Of Interruption: Action Genres in Contemporary Indian Cinema (London: BFI 2002)
Christopher Gow, From Iran to Hollywood and Some Places In-Between: Reframing Post-Revolutionary Iranian Cinema (London and New York: I.B. Tauris 2011)
Leon Hunt Kung Fu Cult Masters: From Bruce Lee to Crouching Tiger, (London: Wallflower 2003)
Leon Hunt (2005) ‘Ong-Bak: New Thai Cinema, Hong Kong and the Cult of the Real’, New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film 3, 2 (2005).
Raminder Kaur and Ajay J. Sinha (eds) Bollywood: Popular Indian Cinema Through a Transnational Lens (New Delhi: Sage 2005)
Kyung Hyun Kim, Virtual Hallyu: Korean Cinema of the Global Era (Durham and London: Duke University Press 2011)
Hyangjin Lee, Contemporary Korean Cinema: Culture, Identity and Politics (Manchester: Manchester University Press 2001)
Leung Wing-Fai and Andy Willis (eds) East Asian Film Stars (Edinburgh University Press 2014).
Song Hwee Lim and Julian Ward (eds) The Chinese Cinema Book (London: BFI 2011)
Sheldon Hsiao-peng Lu (ed) Transnational Chinese Cinema: Identity, Nationhood, Gender (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press 1997).
Jay McRoy (ed) (2005) Japanese Horror Cinema (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press 2005).
Jay McCroy, Nightmare Japan: A Contemporary Japanese Horror Cinema (Editions Rodopi 2007).
Tom Mes, Agitator: The Cinema of Takashi Miike, (London: FAB Press 2003).
Russell Meeuf and Raphael Raphael (eds) Transnational Stardom: International Celebrity in Film and Popular Culture, (Palgrave Macmillan 2013)
Vijay Mishra, Bollywood Cinema: Temples of DesireLondon: Routledge 2002)
Meaghan Morris, Siu Leung Li and Stephen Chan Ching-kiu (eds) Hong Kong Connections: Transnational Imagination in Action Cinema (Hong Kong, Durham and London: Hong Kong University Press/Duke University Press 2005)
Susan Napier, Anime From Akira to Princess Mononoke: Experiencing Contemporary Japanese Animation, Houndmills and New York: Palgrave 2001
Susan Napier, From Impressionism to Anime: Japan as Fantasy and Fan Cult in the Mind of the West, Palgrave 2007.
Aihwa Ong (1999) Flexible Citizenship: The Cultural Logics of Transnationality, Durham NC: Duke University Press 1999
Darcy Paquet, New Korean Cinema: Breaking the Waves (London: Wallflower 2009)
Alastair Philips and Julian Stringer (eds) Japanese Cinema: Texts and Contexts (London and New York: Routledge 2007)
Isolde Standish, A New History of Japanese Cinema (London: Continuum 2005)
Julian Stringer and Chi-yun Shin (eds) New Korean Cinema, (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press 2005).
Kush Varia, Bollywood: Gods, Glamour and Gossip, London and (New York: Wallflower/Columbia University Press 2013).

Valentina Vitali, Hindi Action Cinema: Industry, Narratives, Bodies (Indiana: Indiana University Press 2010)


Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, Kurosawa: Film Studies and Japanese Cinema (Durham, NC: Duke University Press 2000)
Sabrina Qiong Yu, Jet Li: Chinese Masculinity and Transnational Film Stardom (Edinburgh University Press 2012)
Yingjin Zhang, Chinese National Cinema, (London: Routledge 2004).
Journals:
Asian Cinemas
Cinema Journal
Journal of Chinese Cinemas
Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema
Jump Cut (http://ejumpcut.org/)

New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film
Senses of Cinema (http://www.sensesofcinema.com/)
Scope (http://nottingham.ac.uk/film/journal/)
Transnational Cinemas

                                                                                                          
Student Support:

Study skills support is offered in the Library. This covers a number of areas including:

Academic Writing; Critical Reading; Maths, Numeracy and Statistics; Time Management; Presentations and Seminars; Note Taking; and Critical Thinking.

For further details, please contact the Library









Download 387.6 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2020
send message

    Main page