Appr teacher Evaluation Training



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APPR Teacher Evaluation Training

  • Robert Greenberg
  • Regina Cohn
  • December, 2012

Be present: minds and hands-on all day

  • Be present: minds and hands-on all day
  • Respect time boundaries
  • Recognize the need for quiet while working
  • Use electronics respectfully and appropriately when prompted
  • Return to large group attention when signaled

Mission

  • Mission
    • Chapter 103 of the laws of 2010
  • Implementation
    • Connecting legal changes to practice and learning
  • Approach
    • Collegial understanding of adapting regulations to good classroom practice
  • Biblical scholar Hillel asked to give the essence of the Old Testament while standing on one foot.
  • Do not do unto others that which is hateful to you.
  • All the rest is commentary.
  • SED has adopted a deeper, richer curriculum, wants teachers to use evidence (data) to assure it is learned, and administrators and supervisors to use evidence to assure that teachers are teaching it effectively.
  • All the rest is our legal obligation to incorporate this complexity into our daily administrative and supervisory practice!!!!!
  • The Saber Tooth Curriculum
    • Table Talk

Brief overview of the CCLS

  • Brief overview of the CCLS
  • in ELA and Mathematics

Measuring Text Complexity: Three Factors

  • Grade Band
  • Old Lexile Level
  • Lexile Aligned to the CCR Expectations
  • K-1
  • N/A
  • N/A
  • 2-3
  • 450-725
  • 450-790
  • 4-5
  • 645-845
  • 770-980
  • 6-8
  • 860-1010
  • 955-1155
  • 9-10
  • 960-1115
  • 1080-1305
  • 11-CCR
  • 1070-1220
  • 1215-1355
  • 1&2
  • Non-fiction Texts
  • Authentic Texts
  • 3
  • 4&5
  • Focus on command of evidence from text: rubrics and prompts
  • 6
  • Academic Vocabulary
  • Common Core Assessments
  • Common Core Implications

  • TABLE TALK
  • Q – What does “starting” look like in your district?
  • Q – How can districts “find the time” to develop one CC aligned unit each semester?
  • Q – What is the best way to disseminate messages about the new teacher evaluation system?
  • engageNY – Commissioner King

Standard 10

  • Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
  • 11-12
    • By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, history/social studies, science/technical texts in grades 11-CCR band proficiently with scaffolding at the high end of range
    • By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, history/social studies, science/technical texts at the high end of grades 11-CCR band independently and proficiently
  • Grades
  • Literature
  • Informational
  • K-2
  • 50%
  • 50%
  • 3-5
  • 50%
  • 50%
  • 6-12
  • 30%
  • -fiction
  • -poetry
  • -drama
  • -Shakespeare
  • 70%
  • “substantially more literary non-fiction”
  • -essays
  • -speeches
  • -opinion pieces
  • -biographies
  • -journalism
  • -historical
  • -scientific
  • -contemporary events
  • -nature
  • -the arts
  • -Founding Documents

Argument – persuasion

  • Argument – persuasion
    • Defend with evidence from text
    • History/social studies – interpretation & judgments with evidence from multiple sources
    • Science – claims and conclusions that answer questions or address problems
    • K-5 – opinion = argument

Informational/Explanatory

  • Informational/Explanatory
    • Information to provide data
    • Explanatory – clarification
    • Wide array of genres including academic genres (scientific/historical reports/summaries)
  • Narrative
    • Experience – real, imaginary – to inform, instruct, persuade, or entertain
  • Level
  • Argue
  • Explain/Inform
  • Narrative
  • Elementary
  • 30%
  • 35%
  • 35%
  • Middle School
  • 35%
  • 35%
  • 30%
  • High School
  • 40%
  • 40%
  • 20%
  • These forms are not independent. Informing and arguing rely on using information or evidence drawn from texts.

Changes in the CCLS for Mathematics

  • Changes in the CCLS for Mathematics

Shifts in Mathematics

  • Shifts in Mathematics
  • Focus
  • Coherence
  • Fluency
  • Deep Understanding
  • Application
  • Dual Intensity
  • 1
  • Intense Focus
  • 2
  • Linking Back
  • 4, 5, 6
  • Mathematical Modeling
  • Common Core Assessments
  • Common Core Implications
  • Grade
  • Required Fluency
  • K
  • Add/subtract fact families within 5
  • 1
  • Add/subtract fact families within 10
  • 2
  • Add/subtract within 201 Add/subtract within 100 (pencil and paper)
  • 3
  • Multiply/divide within 1002 Add/subtract within 1000
  • 4
  • Add/subtract within 1,000,000
  • 5
  • Multi-digit multiplication
  • 6
  • Multi-digit division Multi-digit decimal operations
  • 7
  • Solve px + q = r, p(x + q) = r
  • 8
  • Solve simple 2.2 systems by inspection
  • Concept / Skill
  • 2005 NYS Core Curriculum
  • 2010 Common Core
  • Number Systems:
  • Decimals - Comparing & Ordering
  • 5.N.8 - Read, write, and order decimals to thousandths
  • 5.N.10 - Compare decimals using <, >, or =
  • 4.NF.6 - Use decimal notation for fractions with denominators 10 or 100. For example, rewrite 0.62 as 62/100; describe a length as 0.62 meters; locate 0.62 on a number line diagram.3
  • 4.NF.7 - Compare two decimals to hundredths by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two decimals refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual model.3
  • 5.NBT.3 - Read, write, and compare decimals to thousandths.
  • b. Compare two decimals to thousandths based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
  • Number Systems:
  • Percents - Meaning of
  • Not directly addressed

Imagine you are in the classroom of a highly effective teacher:

  • Imagine you are in the classroom of a highly effective teacher:
    • What would you see?
    • What would you hear?
    • What would the students be doing or saying?
  • Individually, write one idea per post-it note.
  • Standard 7
  • Professional Growth
  • New York State Teaching
  • Standards

Standard 1: Knowledge of Students & Student Learning

  • Standard 1: Knowledge of Students & Student Learning
    • Knowledge of child development
    • Knowledge of research…
    • Knowledge of diverse learning needs
    • Knowledge of individual students
    • Knowledge of economic, social
    • Knowledge of technological literacy…
  • Standard 2: Knowledge of Content & Instructional Planning
    • Knowledge of content…
    • Connect concepts across disciplines…
    • Uses a broad range of instructional strategies
    • Establishes goals & expectations
    • Designs instruction
    • Evaluate / utilize resources

Standard 3: Instructional Practice

  • Standard 3: Instructional Practice
    • Research-based practices
    • Communicates clearly…
    • High expectations…
    • Variety of instructional… to engage student
    • Engage students in multi-disciplinary skills
    • Monitor and assess progress

Standard 4: The Learning Environment

  • Standard 4: The Learning Environment
    • Creates a respectful, safe and supportive environment
    • Creates an intellectually stimulating environment
    • Manages the learning environment
    • Organize and utilize available resources (e.g. physical space, time, technology…)
  • Standard 5: Assessment for Student Learning
    • Range of assessment tools
    • Understand, analyze, use data for differentiation*
    • Communicates assessment system*
    • Reflect upon assessment system and adjust*
    • Prepare students for assessments
    • * - assessed through “multiple measures”

Standard 6: Professional Responsibilities

  • Standard 6: Professional Responsibilities
    • Upholds standards and policies
    • Collaborate with colleagues
    • Communicate & collaborate with families
    • Perform non-instructional duties
    • Complies with laws and polices

Standard 7: Professional Growth

  • Standard 7: Professional Growth
    • Reflect on practice
    • Set goals for professional development
    • Communicate and collaborate to improve practice
    • Remain current in knowledge of content and pedagogy

 

  •  
  • Table Talk: Using knowledge of the Teaching Standards, when you observe a lesson, what evidence do you see of learning?
  • Re-sort your table’s post-it notes as appropriate to the standard, element and indicator

Pete the Cat

  • Danielson's Framework for Teaching - ASCD Model
  • Danielson's Framework for Teaching - Teachscape
  • Marzano's Causal Teacher Evaluation Model
  • NYSTCE Framework for the Observation of Effective Teaching - Pearson
  • NYSUT - Teacher Practice Rubric
  • Approved rubrics:
  • http://usny.nysed.gov/rttt/teachers-leaders/practicerubrics/home.html
  • The students should be working harder than the teacher.
  • Level
  • State Assessments
  • Local Measures
  • 60% Other Measures
  • Ineffective
  • Results are well-below State average for similar students (or district goals if no State test).
  • Results are well-below district or BOCES-adopted expectations for growth or achievement of student learning for grade/subject
  • Overall performance and results are well below standards.
  • Developing
  • Results are below State average for similar students (or district goals if no State test).
  • Results are below district or BOCES-adopted expectations for growth or achievement of student learning standards for grade/subject.
  • Overall performance and results need improvement in order to meet standards.
  • Level
  • State Assessments
  • Local Measures
  • 60% Other Measures
  • Effective
  • Results meet State average for similar students (or district goals if no State test).
  • Results meet district or BOCES-adopted expectations for growth or achievement of student learning for grade/subject
  • Overall performance and meet standards.
  • Highly Effective
  • Results are well-above State average for similar students (or district goals if no State test).
  • Results are well-above district or BOCES-adopted expectations for growth or achievement of student learning standards for grade/subject.
  • Overall performance and results exceeds expectations.

Ineffective– Teaching shows evidence of not understanding the concepts underlying the component - may represent practice that is harmful - requires intervention

  • Ineffective– Teaching shows evidence of not understanding the concepts underlying the component - may represent practice that is harmful - requires intervention
  • Developing– Teaching shows evidence of knowledge and skills related to teaching - but inconsistent performance
  • Levels of Performance

Effective- Teaching shows evidence of thorough knowledge of all aspects of the profession. Students are engaged in learning. This is successful, accomplished, professional, and effective teaching.

  • Effective- Teaching shows evidence of thorough knowledge of all aspects of the profession. Students are engaged in learning. This is successful, accomplished, professional, and effective teaching.
  • Highly Effective– Classroom functions as a community of learners with student assumption of responsibility for learning.
  • Levels of Performance

Read the descriptors for Element III.4 of the NYSUT rubric or Domain 3C of the Danielson Framework.

  • Read the descriptors for Element III.4 of the NYSUT rubric or Domain 3C of the Danielson Framework.
  • Highlight the words / phrases that distinguish the differences among the levels of performance
  • Engagement in Action
  • Video observation:
  • Observe what students are doing that shows evidence of cognitive engagement, constructing meaning, or critical thinking.
  • Collect evidence from the video, be prepared to share your evidence later.
  • Observing and Evaluating Practice
  • The dos and don’ts…
  • What’s wrong with teacher evaluation?
  • Why hasn’t it traditionally resulted in professional growth?
  • What conditions support professional growth?

Fairness

  • Fairness
  • Reliability
  • Validity

Six Best Practices

  • Six Best Practices
  • 1) Annual Processes, 2) Clear, rigorous expectations, 3) Multiple measures. 4) Multiple ratings, 5) Regular feedback, 6) Significance
    • From Teacher Evaluation 2.0
  • http://www.tntp.org/index.php/publications/issue-analysis/teacher-evaluation-2.0/

Man on Fire – Data informs practice

  • Man on Fire – Data informs practice
  • Table Talk – What made Creasy’s analysis effective?

Evidence is a factual reporting of events.

  • Evidence is a factual reporting of events.
    • It may include teacher and student actions and/or behaviors.
    • It may also include artifacts prepared by the teacher, students, or others.
    • It is not clouded with personal opinion or biases.
    • It is selected using professional judgment by the observer and / or the teacher.

Verbatim scripting of teacher or student comments:

  • Verbatim scripting of teacher or student comments:
  • “Bring your white boards, markers and erasers to the carpet and sit on your square.”
  • Non-evaluative statements of observed teacher or student behavior:
    • Teacher presented the content from the front of room.
  • Numeric information about time, student participation, resource use, etc.:
  • [9:14 – 9:29] Warm-up. 8 of 22 Ss finished at 9:20, sat still until 9:29
  • An observed aspect of the environment:
    • Desks were arranged in groups of four with room to walk between each group.

Actions, by teacher or students

  • Actions, by teacher or students
  • Statements or questions, by teacher or students
  • Observable features of the classroom
  • Review the evidence collected previously – is it evidence? Or opinion?

Today’s activities are an extension of the math unit.

  • Today’s activities are an extension of the math unit.
  • The pacing of the lesson was slow, allowing for student restlessness, disengagement, and disruptive behavior.
  • The new table arrangement encourages concentration and controlled interaction with students.
  • The teacher clearly has planned and organized for maximum effect.
  • As the activity progressed students started calling out, “What should we do next?”
  • The last activity discussed on the key scene was rushed.
  • The teacher said the Civil War was a tragedy for the U.S. civilization.

Definition:

  • Definition:
  • Attaching positive or negative meaning to elements in our environment based on personal or societal influences that shape our thinking.
  • A biased judgment is based on outside influences and is not necessarily related to a teacher’s effectiveness.
  • Example:
  • “Mrs. T does so much for the school, she is an excellent teacher.”
  • The actual classroom evidence may not support the rating of the teacher as “excellent.”

Imagine that you are the parent of a school age child. You are walking down the hall of your child’s school while classes are in session. The doors to several rooms are open and you have the opportunity to look in on teachers.

  • Imagine that you are the parent of a school age child. You are walking down the hall of your child’s school while classes are in session. The doors to several rooms are open and you have the opportunity to look in on teachers.
  • What would cause you to think favorably about what you saw and what would cause you to think negatively? Write your response.

Assessor bias

  • Assessor bias
  • Leniency
  • Central Tendency
  • “Halo” or “Horns” Effect

Reflection:

  • Reflection:
  • As your reflect upon your individual and group responses to these activities, make your own personal list of biases to be aware of when you assess teaching performance.
  • Determine if the bias leads you to assign a higher or lower rating when evaluating teacher performance.
  • COLLECT DATA
  • (Evidence)
  • SORT TO
  • ALIGN
  • WITH YOUR
  • RUBRIC
  • Interpret:
  • Clarify
  • Conclusions
  • Impact on learning…
  • Support needed…
  • NO!

Script the lesson in your style

  • Script the lesson in your style
  • Hold conclusions
  • Beware of bias

Observe the video

  • Observe the video
  • Collect evidence of Standard 3 Instruction or use your district’s rubric:
  • With a partner, sort your evidence so that it aligns with the appropriate criteria in your rubric for instruction
  • Be prepared to share your evidence

Use the self-check questions to review your evidence collection

  • Use the self-check questions to review your evidence collection
    • Have I recorded only facts?
    • Is my evidence relevant to the criteria being examined?
    • Whenever possible, have I quantified words such as few, some, and most?
    • Have I used quotation marks when quoting a teacher or student?
    • Does my selection or documentation of evidence indicate any personal or professional preferences? 
    • Have I included any opinion (in the guise of fact)?

With your partner, develop questions you have about the lesson you observed that must be answered before you rate the teacher’s performance?

  • With your partner, develop questions you have about the lesson you observed that must be answered before you rate the teacher’s performance?
  • Be prepared to share your questions

“After 30 years of doing such work, I have concluded that classroom teaching … is perhaps the most complex, most challenging, and most demanding, subtle, nuanced, and frightening activity that our species has ever invented. ..The only time a physician could possibly encounter a situation of comparable complexity would be in the emergency room of a hospital during or after a natural disaster.”

  • “After 30 years of doing such work, I have concluded that classroom teaching … is perhaps the most complex, most challenging, and most demanding, subtle, nuanced, and frightening activity that our species has ever invented. ..The only time a physician could possibly encounter a situation of comparable complexity would be in the emergency room of a hospital during or after a natural disaster.”
  • Lee Shulman, The Wisdom of Practice

Professional learning never ends.

  • Professional learning never ends.
  • It is every teacher’s responsibility to engage in professional development.
  • Teaching is so complex that it is never done perfectly.
  • Every educator can always become more skilled. Making a commitment to do so is part of the essential work of teaching.
  • Charlotte Danielson
  • The Handbook for Enhancing Professional Practice

Infuse a school’s practices related to professional development;

  • Infuse a school’s practices related to professional development;
  • Be reflected in the school’s practices surrounding mentoring and teacher evaluation; and
  • Regard mentoring and evaluation as ongoing learning.
  • Charlotte Danielson
  • The Handbook for Enhancing Professional Practice

“Teacher evaluation can be an opportunity for genuine professional learning. When organized around clearly established and accepted standards of practice, teacher evaluation offers an opportunity for educators to reflect seriously on their practice, and promote learning.”

  • “Teacher evaluation can be an opportunity for genuine professional learning. When organized around clearly established and accepted standards of practice, teacher evaluation offers an opportunity for educators to reflect seriously on their practice, and promote learning.”
  • Charlotte Danielson
  • The Handbook for Enhancing Professional Practice

Discuss the content of the previous four slides with your colleagues.

  • Discuss the content of the previous four slides with your colleagues.
    • How do you create a culture of professional inquiry in the current climate of teacher accountability?
    • In what ways does the type of questions observers ask of teachers promote – or inhibit – such a climate?
  • Be prepared to share your discussion.

Thoughts, Comments, Questions

  • Thoughts, Comments, Questions
  • Thank you for your participation!

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