Anim sci 2367: Animals in Society Fall Semester, 2012 Lecture



Download 198 Kb.
Page1/2
Date11.09.2018
Size198 Kb.
#64174
  1   2
ANIM SCI 2367: Animals in Society

Fall Semester, 2012
Lecture: Wednesday and Friday; 1:50-2:45am, Location TBD

Recitations: Monday; 8-9:50, 10:05-11:55, 12:10-2:00; 2:15-4:55
Instructor: TBA, Department of Animal Sciences

TBA.1@osu.edu, 292-TBA

Office hours: TBA, TBA Animal Science Building.


TA: TBA; e-mail: TBA.2@buckeyemail.osu.edu
Prerequisites: Successful completion of First Writing course (English XXXX)
Required Text: “They Say/I Say”: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing with Readings (2nd edition) by Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein and Russell Durst
Students are encouraged to spend time with this text and read the chapters when they are assigned. The content of the course – focused on the relationship between humans and animals, when and how this relationship developed and the importance of this relationship in current and future societies – provides the fodder for thought that needs to be expressed, either orally or written. In the words of the authors, this text “will spark students’ interest in some of the most pressing conversations of our day and provide them with some of the tools they need to engage in those conversations with dexterity and confidence.” (Graff, Birkenstein and Durst, p. xviii). The subject of this course, “Animals in Society”, is one of those ‘pressing conversations’!
A goal of this text, and of the course is the “show students that they can best develop their arguments not just by looking inward but by doing what they often do in good conversation with friends and family – by listening carefully to what others are saying and engaging with other views…to stretch what they believe by putting it up against beliefs that differ, sometimes radically, from their own. In an increasingly diverse, global society, this ability to engage with the ideas of others is especially crucial to democratic citizenship.” (Graff and Birkenstein, p. xxix)
Additional reading that is required will be available either as a PDF file that is available through the course Carmen site, via a link to an appropriate outside internet site, or through the OSU library system (http://www.lib.ohio-state.edu/). Students will also find links on the course Carmen site to any videos they are required to view outside of class and to websites that they may be required to visit. Students who have a slow internet connection at home will be advised to download and either print or view the files using computers on campus.
Optional Texts, Reading and Resources:

“Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat – Why It’s So Hard to Think Straight About Animals” by Hal Herzog


“The Animal Connection – A New Perspective on What Makes Us Human” by Pat Shipman
“Writing Analytically” (6th edition) by David Rosenwasser and Jill Stephen – a text used in first year writing courses that talks about the rhetorical nature and process of writing
For assistance with grammar, the mechanics of writing and APA style, see:

      • The Ohio State University Library, APA Style Guide - http://library.osu.edu/help/research-strategies/cite-references/apa/

      • The Ohio State University Center for the Study and Teaching of Writing, Writing Center - http://cstw.osu.edu/writingcenter

      • The Purdue Owl - http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/

      • Grammar Girl - http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/

      • Expository Writing - http://www.stanford.edu/~arnetha/expowrite/info.html



Goals and Objectives: This course is designed to build skills in written communication and expression, reading, critical thinking, knowledge acquisition and evaluation, collaborative group work, and oral expression. These skills are taught through the lens of a diverse topic with multiple opportunities for thought-provoking discussion, Animals in Society. Students learn about the systematic study of human behavior and cognition; of the structure of human societies, cultures and institutions; and of the processes by which individuals and groups interact, communicate, and use human, natural and economic resources in the context of the study of the role that non-human animals have in human society. Students will learn various methods of communication, mostly written, to express their thoughts and reactions as comprehensive and well thought-out compositions.
Learning Objectives:

Writing and Communication 2

Goal: Students build upon skills in written communication and expression, reading, critical thinking, and oral expression
Generic Expected Learning Outcomes:

1. Students apply basic skills in expository writing.

2. Students demonstrate critical thinking through written and oral expression.

3. Students retrieve and use written information analytically and effectively.


Expected Learning Outcomes specific to Level 2:

  1. Through critical analysis, discussion and writing, students extend their ability to read carefully and express ideas effectively

  2. Students further develop basic skills in expository writing and oral expression

  3. Students develop skills in effective communication and in accessing and using information analytically


Social Science Individuals and Groups

Goals: Students learn about the systematic study of human behavior and cognition; of the structure of human societies, cultures, and institutions; and of the processes by which individuals, groups, and societies interact, communicate, and use human, natural, and economic resources.
Generic Expected learning outcomes:

1. Students understand the theories and methods of social scientific inquiry as they are applied to the studies of individuals, groups, organizations, and societies.

2. Students understand the behavior of individuals, differences and similarities in the contexts of human existence (e.g., psychological, social, cultural, economic, geographic, and political), and the processes by which groups, organizations, and societies function.

3. Students develop abilities to comprehend and assess individual and social values, and recognize their importance in social problem solving and policy making.


Specific Individuals and Groups Expected Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students understand the theories and methods of social scientific inquiry as they are applied to the study of individuals and groups

  2. Students understand the behavior of individuals, differences and similarities in social and cultural contexts of human existence, and the processes by which groups function

  3. Students develop abilities to comprehend and assess individual and group values, and recognize their importance in social problem solving and policy making


General Course Objectives

  1. Students demonstrate understanding of the principles of adaptation, evolution and domestication and appreciate the significance of reciprocal human-animal relationships in shaping the development of human sensations, thoughts, language and culture, as well as the physical and psychological characteristics of many animals

  2. Students analyze in some detail many of the current roles that animals play within human societies, including their roles in human health and well-being, education, sport, recreation and entertainment, and as pets and companions, resources, co-workers, units of exchange, pests and competitors

  3. Students comprehend the complexity of debate concerning the potential costs and benefits to humans and animals of having animals embedded within our future societies in various different ways, including understanding that some community members believe that animals should be valued independently of their usefulness to humans, and that this potentially raises issues of balancing human desires and species conservation against the well-being of individual animals

  4. Students demonstrate an understanding of the behavioral, cognitive and emotional capabilities of non-human animals, the applicability of science and applied ethics to ‘animals in society’ issues, and limitations to our current knowledge about animals


How students meet objectives through this course: This course provides a broad range of students with the knowledge, reading, communication and critical thinking skills required to analyze and address questions, concerning how non-human animals can and might co-exist within modern human societies, in an informed and objective manner. Through a common theme with widely varying opinions from many backgrounds, students learn to effectively communicate through written and oral reasons their thoughts and insights on topics within Animal in Society. Throughout the course, students are provided a broad and critical overview of theories and methods of social scientific inquiry as they apply to the study of human-animal relationships, with an emphasis on developing and communicating practical solutions to challenging social issues. In the final weeks of the course, students are encouraged to formulate their own, well-informed, views about how animals should be maintained within future human societies and to articulate these views via written and oral venues.
Students in this course are introduced to the historical context within which human-animal relationships evolved and will reflect on and consider the social, cultural, economic, and legal frameworks within which current human-animal relationships exist. Through in-class discussions, small group inquiry and debate, and student-led analysis and discussion of current and real social issues relevant to the use of animals by humans, students also critically explore a wide range of current animal roles, with a view to broadening their understanding of how integral human relationships with animals are in maintaining human physical, social and psychological health and well-being. The growth of the animal advocacy movement will be described and students will consider whether the leading frameworks used to address human moral issues can be effectively applied to animals. Students learn why scientific knowledge about animals is required to objectively inform the attitudes and beliefs that shape social decision-making processes and become familiar with leading scientific approaches to the assessment of animal welfare.
Through multiple face-to-face and electronic communication opportunities, students also extend skills in effective written and oral communication and expression and in assessing and using information (“information literacy”). These skills equip students both for their future studies and for informed decision making in daily life. Assessment for the course is multi-dimensional and focuses on skills acquisition. Students work in groups to develop analytical skills and are taught how to access, evaluate and present scientific information. They are required to extract critical points from each lecture, reading, and video material presented in class, and there are ample opportunities for class discussions considering a range of scientific, legal and moral issues. An on-line discussion group is used to develop electronic literacy skills, and students are also encouraged to research contemporary issues by discussing them with the wider community.

Animal Sciences 2367 Learning Outcomes:
Successful students will be able to:

  1. Use the knowledge acquired in the course to objectively and critically evaluate current issues involving animals in society

  2. Utilize concepts presented in class or obtained through peer reviewed or unbiased information sources, as well as through societal and personal values, to participate in informed discussion (and to make informed decisions) regarding issues surrounding the roles animals serve in human society

  3. Participate in informed and respectful debate, regarding uses of animals in human society, with peers, utilizing concepts discussed in class or obtained through peer reviewed or unbiased information sources

  4. Effectively execute important generic skills in critical analysis, teamwork, computer-assisted learning and academic writing

  5. Differentiate types of oral and written communication and information – opinion versus fact-based, peer-reviewed versus un-refereed, biased versus neutral, etc. – and utilize this information selectively in class assignments, discussions and the decision-making process

  6. Formulate an effective written composition by using the university library system as well as the internet to obtain reliable information (peer reviewed, fact-based, neutral sources, etc) on a topic of choice relating to a role animals play in human society, developing a thesis regarding this role, developing a case to support this thesis, demonstrating an understanding of the opposing perspective, and drawing a conclusion based on evidence

  7. Provide constructive feedback to peer students regarding course writing assignments, using an assignment-specific rubric that focuses on mechanics as well as content (e.g., thesis development, knowledge, critical thinking, use of scientific evidence, and impact); gain an understanding of the peer review process

  8. Utilize constructive feedback from peers and instructors to revise and improve writing assignments; gain an understanding of the value of revision in written communication

Course Rationale

The place of nonhuman animals in our global and local communities has long been the topic of controversial and emotive debate. Most humans in developed countries accept that we have a moral and social obligation towards animals, whether they are wild, farmed, kept in zoos, kept as companions or used for research. Most people also accept that animals inextricably affect human health and welfare in many diverse ways. This reciprocal interconnection is greatest where humans and animals have formed symbiotic relationships due to the process of domestication, but human population growth and the continued expansion of our habitat mean that very few animal species remain unaffected by human activities. Unfortunately, it has proved difficult to achieve consensus on the fair and humane treatment of animals; the extent of society’s obligations towards animals; and standards of animal welfare that society should provide. A wide range of views about animals exist, often based on misinformation and poorly informed value-based judgments. These have direct implications for agriculture, science, some sporting activities and pet owners. Divergent views also have indirect implications for the wider community, with differences of opinion about animal issues causing substantial social disharmony.

An evaluation of the various roles for animals within our global society, which is informed and objective, requires that our community learn to integrate moral views with biological, social and cultural facts. This requires an understanding of theories and methods of social science and familiarity with factors underlying those human actions that affect other species. In recent years, the welfare implications of many animal practices and the response of animals to these practices have been identified. Considerable information about the physical, psychological and social benefits of human engagement with animals has also accumulated, whether this occurs as companions, food sources, recreational participants or medical models. Unfortunately, there is limited transfer of this knowledge to people employed to work with animals and, more generally, to those with an interest in human-animal relationships.

A university course is the ideal mode by which to facilitate the general transfer of knowledge about the diverse roles and obvious impact that animals have within human communities. Very few such courses exist in the USA although successful models have been developed internationally, most notably in Australia. In recent years, the Department of Animal Sciences at OSU has developed close collaborative links with social and physical scientists from the Animal Welfare Science Centre, a cross-institutional centre that facilitates animal welfare science and education in Australia and internationally. This collaboration provides OSU with access to the expertise required to develop a comprehensive, cutting-edge, social science course about animals in society.



The Animals in Society course is an innovative and attractive program that demonstrates responsiveness to the needs of the community. It provides a unique opportunity for OSU graduates to lead community debate about animal issues and to acquire generic academic skills in the context of studying material that is both engaging and socially relevant. In addition, this course enhances opportunities for the Department of Animal Sciences at OSU to further develop a reputation of national and international significance in this area of research and training. Students who satisfactorily complete this course will be knowledgeable, skilled, reflective and compassionate. They will be innovative in their approach to, and solution of, problems in the area of animals in society. They will be skilled at accessing, appraising and applying the best available evidence to their everyday practice and will be inspired to maintain high standards throughout their professional and personal lives.

Course Description
Animal Sciences 2367 is divided into three main modules that demonstrate the origin and evolution of the human-animal relationship, providing opportunities for reflection, discussion and presentation of ideas in oral and written modalities. Each week, students attend two lectures and one recitation class or, as appropriate, complete equivalent online learning activities. They are also expected to undertake activities outside class time. The recitation classes are utilized for the development of oral and written communication skills, in context with the content provided in the lecture series, including time for reflection and discussion (face-to-face and electronic). An important component of the recitation classes is exposure to written and video material presenting different ideas about the human-animal relationship. Each writing and video will be critically analyzed during the class in which it is assigned or presented. Students also spend time in most classes developing oral and written communication and expression skills.
MODULE A: Humans and Animals Living Together in the Past
The main objective in this module is for students to acquire an extensive knowledge base concerning how interdependent humans and animals are and reflect on how this interdependence has historically permeated all aspects of human existence and cultural development. An important part of this first module is setting the scene for how the course is to proceed, based on a modern ‘community of inquiry’ model, with student participation encouraged and an emphasis on shared exploration of topics and individual/group reflection rather than didactic ‘expert’ teaching.
MODULE B: Humans and Animals Living Together in the Present
Having established some of the historical factors that have influenced the co-evolution of humans and animals, and the legal, social and cultural context within which our society currently operates, it is of relevance to analyze current human-animal relationships in some depth. In this module students consider a variety of ways in which humans and animals interact, with particular attention to historical, cultural and individual differences. Students explore the concepts used to describe and categorize animals in society and apply these concepts to the analysis of visual and written media from a variety of sources (e.g., advertising, science, advocacy groups). What does it mean when we say that an animal is a resource or a scientific model or a racehorse or an endangered species? Can only specific animals assume some of these roles or are roles for animals culturally, socially and historically determined? The aim is to demonstrate to students that it is not necessarily something intrinsic to an animal species that determines how it is perceived and treated by humans but, more often, something in our own psychology.
MODULE C: Places for animals in future societies
At this point students should understand that animals have been and continue to be integral to human societies in a number of different ways. They should also understand that roles for animals are largely socially constructed, being relative to time, place and context, and be able to articulate this understanding relative to their own experience with animals. This knowledge means that current roles for animals are not inevitable or immutable, but merely provide a contemporary background against which future roles can be defined. The aim in this module is to provide students with the knowledge and skills required to make informed decisions regarding how animals will exist within future societies, and utilize the concepts learned to form and express and informed opinion utilizing written and oral communication skills.
Lecture (Wednesday and Friday) and Recitation (Monday) Schedule (may be adjusted for holidays or to accommodate semester schedule)


Module A

Lecture Topics (Wednesday and Friday)

Module A

Recitation (Monday)




Preparation for Recitation

Recitation Activities

Assignment(s) following recitation

LA.1 Humans – Sensing Animals
LA.2 Humans – Thinking Animals

LA.3 Humans – Talking Animals


LA.4 Adaptation: the key to individual and species survival.
LA.5 Co-domestication: adapting to living with each other.
LA.6 Time, place, culture and our understanding of animals in society –Nature video “Holy Cow!”

LA.7 Recent changes in human-animal relationships I: industrialization and science.


LA.8 Recent changes in human-animal relationships II: attitudes and laws.
LA.9 How human brains make sense of animals


1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Introduction

  • Ch 1: “They Say”

2. Notice and discuss animal-related issues discussed in the media. Find and bring to class a current media item about any animal related event, activity or story


3. Start looking for an event to use for Press Release/Media Item assignment



R1.A1

1.Get to know each other


2.Review course and assessment requirements
3. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
4. Application (Small Group) – share media item with group-mates. What is the author saying (use concepts from Ch 1)?
5.Complete group exercise exploring how humans and nonhumans relate to each other
6. In class writing #1 – Reflection: Describe how the person you are has been formed by your experience with animals? How have your senses contributed to this experience?
7. Review assignments for R2.A2

1. Re-read In class writing #1 – edit, paying attention to grammar, sentence structure, clarity, flow of thought. Share with a friend or family member and ask for their input and edits. Revise again – to be submitted to instructor during R2.A2.


2. Finalize idea for Writing Assignment #1-Press Release/Media Item assignment: Select a current event, issue, symposium or forum, about which you will be responsible to write a Press/Media Release. Any issue/event that has or will occur during Autumn semester is eligible.


1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 2: “Her Point Is”

2. Bring to class current revision of In class writing #1 to submit to instructor for feedback


3. Bring to class idea for Press Release/Media Item assignment


R2.A2

1. Submit revised In class writing #1 for instructor input


2. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
3. Watch Nature video: “Animal Minds: Are animals conscious?”
4. Application (Large Group) – Summarize the major points of the video; what is/are the take home message(s)?
5. Review Writing Assignment #1 – Press Release/Media Item; Tutorial on writing a press release/media item; guidelines for the assignment
6. In class writing #2 – Explain: What does it mean to be “conscious”; are animals conscious? All animals? Some animals? What does society say? Where do you draw the line?
7. Submit idea for Press Release/Media Item – 1st draft due in R3.A3
8. Review assignments for R3.A3

1. Read the paper by Serpell (2003: Anthropomorphism and anthropomorphic selection – beyond the “cute” response).
2. Watch the Colbert video (available on Carmen)
3. Think about what the Colbert video and the Serpell paper say about relationships between humans and animals? Ask your friends, family and classmates (via Carmen discussion groups) what they think about the importance of these relationships for the health and well-being of current and future humans?
4. Re-read in-class writing #2 – edit, paying attention to grammar, sentence structure, clarity, flow of thought. Share with a class-mate and ask for their input and edits. Revise again – to be submitted to instructor during R3.A3.
5. Write 1st draft of Press Release/Media Item writing assignment, following guidelines provided in R2.A2


1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 3: “As He Himself Puts It”

2. Bring to class current revision of In class writing #2 to submit to instructor for feedback


3. Bring three copies of first draft of Press Release/Media Item


R3.A3

1. Submit revised In class writing #2 for instructor input


2. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
3. Application – Discuss how quotes can be utilized to make a point, provide anecdotal evidence, support a statement, or generate interest (using quotes in your Press Release/Media Item assignment)
4. Complete activity exploring legal issues involving animals
5. Review assignment rubric; tutorial on providing constructive feedback using grading rubrics.
6. Peer/instructor review of draft of Press Release/Media Item assignment using class rubric
7. In class writing #3 – Reflection: How has the role of animals in society changed from the earliest co-evolution of humans and animals to today? How has your understanding of the role of animals in society changed or been impacted by what you have learned so far in this course?
8. Review assignments for R4.B1


1. Re-read in-class writing #3 – edit, paying attention to grammar, sentence structure, clarity, flow of thought. Share with a friend or class-mate and ask for their input and edits. Revise again – to be submitted to instructor during R4.B1.
2. Revise Press Release/Media Item based on peer/instructor feedback; Revised submission due in R4.B1
3. Find out what your family, friends and classmates think about some of the legal issues discussed in class.



Module B

Lecture Topics (Wednesday and Friday)

Module B

Recitation (Monday)




Preparation for Recitation

Recitation Activities

Assignment(s) following recitation

B.1 Animals as family


B.2 Animals as objects

B.3 Animals as pests and competitors


B.4 Animals as educational tools

B.5 Animals as threats to human health


B.6 Animals as participants in sport, recreation and entertainment

B.7 Changing animals – how genetic technologies allow humans to both modify animals and create ‘new’ ones.


B.8 Valuing animals


1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 4: “Yes/No/Okay, But”

2. Bring to class current revision of In class writing #3 to submit to instructor for feedback


3. Bring to class final revision of Press Release/Media Item assignment to submit to instructor for assessment

R4.B1
1. Submit revised In class writing #3 for instructor input
2. Submit revised Press Release/Media Item assignment for instructor assessment
3. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
4. Watch Nature video: “Animal Minds: Are animals intelligent?”
5. Application (Small Group) – Consider the question of the video – Are animals intelligent? – utilizing the response methodology presented in the text reading; share conclusions of small group with large group
6. In class writing #4 – How does the way we categorize animals affect our consideration of whether animals are intelligent?
7. Review assignments for R5.B2


1. Re-read in-class writing #4 – edit, paying attention to grammar, sentence structure, clarity, flow of thought. Share with a friend or class-mate and ask for their input and edits. Revise again – to be submitted to instructor during R5.B2.
2. Watch Sue Savage-Rumbaugh video (2004: The real-life culture of Bonobos, Apes that write, start fires and play Pac-man). Think about whether you think animals are intelligent or not and ask your friends, family and classmates what they think. Think about whether some animals are more intelligent than others? Does this have implications for how we should treat them?
3. Perform a library or internet search: “Health Benefits of Pets” or “Health Benefits of Assistance Animals” – find, read and summarize one article from your search to share with class in R5.B2. Include in your summarization the sources of the evidence that is provided to support claims made in the article
4. Think about your emotional reactions to animals and talk to family, friends and classmates about theirs. Consider why it is that different animal species elicit different emotions. Could you love a snake or a hippo? Why or why not?


1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 5: “And Yet”

2. Bring to class current revision of In class writing #4 to submit to instructor for feedback


3. Bring to class your “Health Benefits” article and summary


R5.B2
1. Submit revised In class writing #4 for instructor input
2. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
3. Application (Small Group): Share results of library/web search on health benefits of pets or assistance animals. Based what the articles (they) say: Are there benefits? Are the benefits ‘real’? Are ‘all’ animals equally suited for the role of pet or assistance animal? What are the characteristics of good pets? Good assistance animals? How credible is the information? What do you say?
4. In class writing #5 – Reflect on what you heard in your group discussion; put in writing your thoughts on the benefits (or lack thereof) of animals in human society
5. Review Writing Assignment #2 – Essay; Present Essay topics and discuss Essay assignment; Review how to access and evaluate scientific literature and internet-based information
6. Review assignments for R6.B3


1. For in class writing assignments #1, #2 and #3 - consider instructor feedback and your preference; choose two of the three assignments to revise and submit to instructor in R6.B3 for grading (15 points each)
2. Re-read in-class writing #5 – edit, paying attention to grammar, sentence structure, clarity, flow of thought. Share with a friend or class-mate and ask for their input and edits. Revise again – to be submitted to instructor during R6.B3.
3. Read the paper by Howard Frumkin (2001: Beyond toxicity: human health and the natural environment). Be prepared to contribute to the class summarization of what the author is saying, and provide at least one criticism or objection to what is being stated in this article – come from the role of skeptic! (see Ch 6 of your text)
4. Review Essay topics and read background references; select topic for your Essay



1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 6: “Skeptics May Object”

2. Bring to class current revision of In class writing #5 to submit to instructor for feedback


3. Bring to class final revision of Module A in class writing assignments (choice, two of #1, #2 or #3) to submit to instructor for assessment
4. Bring to class the Essay topic you have chosen and a copy of the related background reference

R6.B3
1. Submit revised In class writing #5 for instructor input
2. Submit re-revised Module A in class writing assignments (student choice, two of #1, #2, #3) for instructor assessment
3. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
4. Application (Large Group): As a group, summarize the Frumkin paper – What are the claims? What is the evidence? Are there objections or criticisms based on personal experience (anecdotal evidence) or concepts we have learned in class? What do you conclude?
5. In class writing #6 – How does the way we categorize animals determine whether we find them to be an ally or competitor? Benefit or threat? Can the same animal be all of the above?
6. Form Essay groups based on selected topics; discuss background reference and brainstorm ideas for finding additional sources
7. Tutorial on writing and referencing academic essays
8. Review assignments for R7.B4



1. Re-read in-class writing #6 – edit, paying attention to grammar, sentence structure, clarity, flow of thought. Share with a friend or class-mate and ask for their input and edits. Revise again – to be submitted to instructor during R7.B4.
2. Find and briefly summarize 2-3 scientific papers and 2 websites relevant to your Essay topic.
3. Read the paper by Dale Jamieson (1985: Against Zoos). Think about your own recreational experiences involving animals and talk with family, friends and classmates about theirs. What roles, if any, should zoos and wildlife reserves fulfill in our modern societies? How do you feel about hunting as a form of species preservation?



1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 7: “So What? Who Cares?”

2. Bring to class current revision of In class writing #6 to submit to instructor for feedback


3. Bring to class summaries of Essay sources

R7.B4
1. Submit revised In class writing #6 for instructor input
2. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
3. Watch the Theo Jansen video (2007: The art of creating creatures)
4. Application: Individual – make a list of reason(s) the creations of Theo Jansen matter when we think about how we define “animals”. Small group – share lists and discuss: Who cares that someone can take non-living materials and make something that has attributes of life? Why does this matter?
5. In class writing #7 – What criteria do you use to place a value on animal? How do these criteria help you define what an animal is and is not?
6. Share summaries of selected references with peers in Essay group
7. Review assignments for R8.C1

1. Re-read in-class writing #7 – edit, paying attention to grammar, sentence structure, clarity, flow of thought. Share with a friend or class-mate and ask for their input and edits. Revise again – to be submitted to instructor during R8.C1.
2. Formulate the introductory paragraph with thesis statement of your Essay and complete your ideas map.
3. Watch the TED video by Robert Full: Learning from the gecko's tail (http://www.ted.com/talks/robert_full_learning_from_the_gecko_s_tail.html). Think about the role that animals play in scientific discovery; discuss with family and friends.


Module C

Lecture Topics (Wednesday and Friday)

Module C

Recitation (Monday)










Preparation for Recitation

Recitation Activities

Assignment(s) following recitation

C.1 The animal advocacy movement as a determinant of how animals will exist within future societies

C.2 How humans traditionally make decisions about right and wrong actions
C.3 Moral reasoning based on consequences

C.4 Moral reasoning beyond consequences


C.5 Incorporating welfare into decisions affecting animals
C.6 How welfare scientists think about animal welfare
C.7 What does the future look like for wild animals?

C.8 What does the future look like for companion animals?


C.9 What does the future look like for animals in industry?

1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 8: “As a Result”

2. Bring to class current revision of In class writing #7 to submit to instructor for feedback

3. Bring to class draft of your Essay ideas map, introductory paragraph including your thesis statement



R8.C1
1. Submit revised In class writing #7 for instructor input
2. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
3. Watch first episode of video: Animal Pharm
4. Application: Small group discussion – what did you learn in the video about how animals might be used in the future using science and genetic technologies? What do you think could be the results of these technologies – for human health and well-being? For animal health and well-being? Are the results opposing or synergistic or both?
5. Discuss progress on Essay with group members – share introductory paragraphs and get feedback; discuss challenges; share suggestions
6. Form groups for group presentation and receive guidelines for topic selection, group assignment and Oral Presentation format; group discussion and planning
7. Review assignments for R9.C2


1. Continue to work on your Essay using suggestions and feedback from your Essay group
2. Communicate with Oral Presentation group – outline presentation, assign tasks
3. Think about how you would feel about accepting an organ from an animal? How would friends, family and classmates feel? How do you feel generally about medical and agricultural research involving animals?

1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 9: “Ain’t So/Is Not”


R9.C2
1. Discuss progress on Essay with group members
2. Review: Essay grading rubric
3. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
4. Application: In small groups, complete the activity, introduction to ethics and moral reasoning - listen to what others say and gain an understanding of their perspective, and provide your insights based on your perspective and personal experience; acknowledge the value of each person’s voice in the conversation
5. Meet with Oral Presentation group – status check
6. Review assignments for R10.C3


1. Complete the first draft of your Essay.
2. For in class writing assignments #4, #5, #6 and #7 - consider instructor feedback and your preference; choose two of the four assignments to revise and submit to instructor in R10.C3 for grading (15 points each)
3. Communicate with Oral Presentation group – formalize presentation structure, status check on task


1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 10: “But Don’t Get Me Wrong”

2. Bring to class final revision of Module B in class writing assignments (choice, two of #4, #5, #6 or #7) to submit to instructor for assessment


3. Bring three copies of first draft of Essay


R10.C3
1. Distribute first draft of Essay to two peers within Essay group and instructor (bring 3 copies)
2. Review: providing constructive feedback using grading rubrics (see R3.A3)
3. In class: read two group member’s Essay drafts and provide feedback using grading rubric.
4. Return peer feedback of first draft of Essay and instructor feedback of introductory paragraph (including thesis statement and conclusion).
5. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
6. Application: Use the concepts in the chapter from the text to form discussion in small groups - How to interpret the feedback you received on your Essay; how to respond. Use class time to read feedback and ask questions of peer reviewers for clarification.
7. Watch the Nature video: “Animal Minds: Do animals have emotions?” Complete activity: the challenge of establishing animal sentience
8. Meet with Oral Presentation group – status check
9. Review assignments for R11.C4



1. Revise Essay utilizing peer and instructor feedback.
2. Spend some time surfing the internet for animal advocacy groups other than those discussed in class. Take note of their aims and methods and also of their current campaigns. Discuss these campaigns with family and friends; note your findings and discussions and bring to R11.C4
3. Following lectures C.3 and C.4, and prior to Recitation R11.C4, read the short papers by Peter Singer (1985: Ethics and the new animal liberation movement) and Tom Regan (1985: The case for animal rights). These papers marked the beginning of the modern animal advocacy movement. Note the different approaches to animal ethics and think about your own views. Query friends, family and classmates about the views they hold.
4. Continue work with Oral Presentation group

1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 11: “I Take Your Point”

2. Bring to class in one packet (stapled or clipped together – top to bottom): Final revision of Essay; peer reviews of first draft (rubric and copy of the Essay stapled together); instructor review of first draft; ideas map


3. Bring notes from animal advocacy group information gathering exercise

R11.C4
1. Submit final draft of Essay plus supporting documents.
2. Discussion of any difficulties encountered during feedback task
3. Assess quality and helpfulness of peer feedback received
4. Review and discuss assigned reading from text and papers by Singer and Regan
5. Application: Identify, compare and contrast communication strategies (via internet, traditional media, etc.; use of fact, emotion, etc.) of animal advocacy groups; compare and contrast the moral frameworks utilized by Singer and Regan and the advocacy groups with which they align
6. Preparation for Writing Assignment #3 – Reaction Paper – watch and discuss video: Louis Theroux goes hunting; generate idea map for written response – concepts that will be used to respond to the prompt; evidence provided in the video; pros and cons; anecdotal evidence from personal experience, etc.
7. Meet with Oral Presentation group – status check
8. Review assignments for R12.C5


1. Write first draft of third writing assignment (Reaction Paper); respond to prompt provided
2. Finalize Oral Presentation assignment; arrange practice session with instructor

1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 12: “What’s Motivating This Writer?”

2. Bring first draft of third writing assignment (Reaction Paper) for peer evaluation
3. Groups 1 and 2 prepared to give Oral Presentation



R12.C5
1. Exchange first draft of third writing assignment (Reaction Paper) with a classmate for feedback using class rubric
2. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
3. Application: Complete activity - Using science to determine the welfare of animals; what is science trying to tell us? How do the approaches to welfare reflect the perspectives of the proponents of the approaches?
4. Oral Presentations (2 groups) – obtain peer, instructor and invited guests feedback and assessment
5. Review assignments for R13.C6


1. Revise third writing assignment (Reaction Paper) based on peer feedback and personal reflection
2. Watch the Jane Goodall video (2003: What separates us from the apes?)
3. Finalize Oral Presentation assignment; arrange practice session with instructor

1. Read:

“They Say/I Say”



  • Ch 13: “Analyze This”

2. Bring revised third writing assignment (Reaction Paper) for instructor assessment


3.Groups 3, 4 and 5 prepared to give Oral Presentation

R13.C6
1. Review and discuss assigned reading from text
2. Application: Using all the concepts we have discussed in class, your personal experience, and the insights you have gained through hearing the perspectives of your classmates - Discuss how future animals might contribute to human society, human health and well-being (including health benefits associated with companion animals, assistance animals, etc.); What is the role for animals in society? What, if any, is human responsibility toward non-human animals?
3. Submit final draft of third writing assignment – Reaction Paper to video: Louis Theroux goes hunting – to instructor for assessment
4. Oral Presentations (3 groups) – obtain peer, instructor and invited guests feedback and assessment
5. Writing reflection – recall the Jane Goodall video (2003: What separates us from the apes) and think about what you’ve learned in this course. Do you feel positively or negatively about the future of animals in society? Would you recommend the ‘Roots and Shoots’ program to your friends and family members?
6. Course evaluation







Evaluation
1. “In class” Recitation Writing Assignments (to reflect, analyze, articulate an opinion, etc.)

Multiple opportunities for students to utilize course concepts will be provided during recitation sessions 1 through 7. These will take the form of short (10 minutes, approximately 200 words) “in class” writing assignments and will be focused on the content of the corresponding lectures and relate to the writing skills emphasized in the text assignment. Students will select and submit 2 writings for assessment at the completion of modules A and B after receiving feedback and having the opportunity to revise; each will be worth up to 15 points (30 points total per module; total 60 points for “in-class” writing activities).


2. Group Oral Presentation

The group oral presentation will provide students the opportunity to demonstrate oral communication skills as well as comprehensive integration of the concepts of the course, while considering a selected role of animals in society and how this role differs by culture, by context or in time (i.e., past to present to future). Students will form groups of 5 within the recitation section, will consider and select a topic utilizing guidelines provided by the instructor and will submit the topic for approval. Students will be provided limited in class time to work on the group presentation but will be expected to meet outside class for the majority of the preparation required for this assignment. The group presentation is worth a total of 30 points toward the final grade. The points for this assignment will be distributed:



  • Group points (up to 20 points of the total 30) will incorporate feedback from peers in the audience utilizing a class rubric,

  • Individual points (up to 10 points of the total 30) will be based on feedback from group members as to contributions of the individual toward the final presentation and will utilize a class rubric.


3. “Out-of-class” Writing Assignments with peer and/or instructor review and write-rewrite opportunities


Download 198 Kb.

Share with your friends:
  1   2




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2023
send message

    Main page