Als, DepEd, CamSur



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Funding Cycle


The municipal and barangay budget submissions are due in September/October each year. It is very important for PSDSs, BLWFPs, DALSCs, and MTs to begin consultation early with the municipal government. Consultation should begin in August/September to give ample time to develop and refine their proposals for the BLW Program. If provincial funding is required, submissions should be made through the ALS Division Supervisor, who will include this in the ALS funding submission to the provincial government in August/September.

  1. BLW Program General Funding Proposal

  1. BLW Program Calendar of Events


  1. BLW Recruitment


    The purpose of this section is to instruct the BLW Focal Person (BLWFP) on how and when to conduct BLW recruitment activities, and which community stakeholders should be involved in these processes. The section will cover recruitment rules and recommendations, including selection criteria, key competencies, qualifications, and personal attributes, the recruitment process, and the recruitment cycle, as well as explain the Memorandum of Agreement (MoA). The activities outlined herein reflect those described in the Provincial BLW Ordinance and should be adhered to whenever possible. Some local variations may arise depending on the input of key stakeholders in each district.
    1. BLW Key Competencies, Qualifications, and Personal Attributes


A Barangay Literacy Worker must possess or demonstrate the following key competencies:

  • confidence in the delivery of learning modules and facilitation of classes comprising both youth and adults;

  • ability to use methods and strategies appropriate to teaching learners with diverse needs;

  • good community organization skills, including advocacy and program coordination;

  • good problem solving skills, particularly in relation to the resolution of practical real-world problems;

  • demonstrated capacity to work both as part of a team and autonomously; and

  • demonstrated proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking both Filipino and English


The successful applicant will also be at least 18 years of age and possess a high school diploma, or equivalent, although preference will be given to those with a college degree. The applicant should have some experience in teaching, training, or community organizing. ALS Passers often express interest in joining the program as implementers; they should be afforded equal consideration.

A Barangay Literacy Worker must be passionate about serving the community as a volunteer and believe in the importance of education as an agent of social change. The BLW must possess excellent interpersonal skills and be both willing and able to forego the methods of formal teaching in order to cater to the diverse learning needs of Out-of-School Youth and Adults (OSYA). He or she must maintain a positive attitude in the face of challenges and obstacles and have the ability to take the initiative to develop creative solutions to problems. It is important that the Barangay Literacy Worker is able to communicate with, and relate to, a diverse range of community members. To be considered for the position, candidates must have no pending cases against them in the barangay, and no derogatory record in the municipality. Finally, inclusive recruitment should be practised, wherein applicants with a disability are afforded equal consideration.

BLWFPs, DALSCs, and MTs should consider the following groups as potential BLWs: former ALS Accreditation and Equivalency (A&E) Secondary passers; retired teachers; education graduates awaiting results of the Licensure Examination for Teachers; college graduates; and other respected members of the community. Those who already hold a position in the barangay council, for example the Barangay Captain or a barangay official, are not eligible to be BLWs with an honorarium.
    1. Recruitment Process


All BLW vacancies should be posted in conspicuous spaces in the barangay hall and common community areas, such as the plaza. Vacancies should also be advertised on the district’s ALS Facebook page. Whenever possible, BLW vacancy notices shall be posted at least 4 weeks prior the specified starting date of the appointment. Responsibility for posting these notices should fall to the Barangay Committee on Education. If the Barangay Committee on Education requires assistance, the BLWFP on should be willing and able to help.

All BLW applications should be submitted to the barangay council and subsequently discussed with the BLWFP. Shortlisted BLW applicants will then undergo an interview with the BLWFP, the Barangay Captain, and the Barangay Committee on Education. Ideally, this process should be completed before the end of December, in preparation for the BLW to begin their service in January.

  1. BLW Recruitment Advertisement

  1. BLW Interview Questions
    1. Recruitment Cycle


The BLW recruitment cycle shall commence each year in November. The BLWFP should instigate recruitment activities and the Barangay Captain should also play a role in recommending suitable candidates and participating in the interview process. Some barangay councils may wish to have greater participation in the recruitment process, but they should always consider the advice of the BLWFP.

Should a BLW terminate their service early, the BLWFP should be prepared to restart the recruitment process immediately. Ideally, the BLW should give 4 weeks’ notice before ceasing service, leaving time for a suitable replacement to be recruited and trained.

  1. BLW Program Calendar of Events
    1. Memorandum of Agreement (MoA)


The Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) outlines the responsibilities and duties of both the barangay council and the Barangay Literacy Worker. The MoA also stipulates the length of BLW service – usually this is 12 months. The BLW must give 4 weeks’ notice should they wish to exit the contract before completion of their service. Likewise, the barangay council, in consultation with the BLWFP, may choose to terminate the contract should the BLW be found to be unwilling or unable to perform their duties.

The MoA specifies the honorarium, hours of service, and the responsibilities of the BLW including, but not limited to, delivery of learning programs, annual literacy mapping, regular advocacy and recruitment activities, and completion of a monthly accomplishment report. The MoA also details the responsibilities of the Barangay Captain, including but not limited, to the facilitation of recruitment activities, annual planning, and monitoring and evaluation activities.

The MoA should be signed by relevant parties upon recruitment of a suitable candidate and shall be renewed annually. The MoA is a contract, which means that the individuals who sign it are obliged to ensure the responsibilities assigned to them therein are carried out in an adequate and timely manner.

When the BLW has signed the MoA they can then be issued with an identification card. This will signal his/her official BLW role to the community and give them a sense of belonging to the ALS team. They can also be issued with an ALS or BLW T-shirt.

  1. BLW Memorandum of Agreement

  2. BLW ID Card

  1. BLW Logo Photoshop Version for T-Shirts


  1. BLW Program Training


    It is essential for the longevity of the program that both ALS management and BLWs themselves have the knowledge, skills, and techniques to adequately perform their roles. The purpose of this section is to provide recommendations for training procedures.

    Training for ALS management staff will help team members understand their new BLW-related roles and responsibilities as well as offering the opportunity to discuss ideas and issues with fellow ALS team members.



    Training for Barangay Literacy Workers should aim to equip a BLW with the knowledge and skills they need to serve their community’s literacy needs through ALS. The resources outlined in this section include an example training schedule for BLW training, a sample training budget, and relevant PowerPoint presentations and activities for a 3 day orientation session. As professional development is a continuous process, strategies to further build the capacity of BLWs, such as work shadowing, mentorship, and enhancement training will also be discussed.
    1. Management Training for BLW Program


On an annual or biannual basis, BLWFPs, DALSCs, MTs, and EPSAs should receive a BLW Program refresher course, to be instigated by the BLW Program Coordinator (BLWC). The course should revisit the responsibilities of each role, discuss program progression, and give implementers and management the opportunity to workshop solutions to any program issues that have arisen. Participants will also be able to discuss awareness and advocacy activities with fellow implementers.
    1. Formal BLW Training


An initial training workshop is to be held for BLWs after signing their MoA; this workshop should introduce BLWs to the Alternative Learning System (ALS), and orient them to their functions and duties in the barangay. The training should, furthermore, introduce BLWs to their key responsibilities such as literacy mapping, conducting classes, and compiling learner portfolios. At this time, their responsibilities to report to various stakeholders, such as the BLWFP, DALSC/MT, Barangay Captain and barangay council should also be clearly explained. Trainers should make an effort to ensure that this initial training is interactive and engaging, and continues to spark enthusiasm for becoming a BLW.

Training should be conducted at the district level, or can be clustered to include a number of districts. The BLWFP, DALSC, and MT are responsible for instigating this training. They may also consider utilizing their colleagues in other districts as facilitators for various sessions.

It is important to take into account current BLW skills and knowledge, budget, and availability of resource speakers when designing a BLW training schedule. It is recommended that the training be 2 to 3 days in length.

  1. 3 Day BLW Training Matrix

The following is a list of BLW training topics for an initial training session. Each of these training topics consists of a single PowerPoint presentation and should be followed by a group activity. These presentations and activities can be modified to suit your needs.

  1. Introduction to the BLW Program Presentation

  2. Roles of a BLW Presentation

  3. Learning Styles and Strategies for BLWs Presentation

  4. BLW Basic Literacy Program Presentation

  5. BLW Accreditation and Equivalency Presentation

  6. BLW Essay Writing – Pagsulat ng Sanaysay Presentation

  7. BLW Monitoring and Evaluation Presentation

  8. BLW Awareness and Advocacy Presentation

  9. BLW Literacy Mapping and Learner Portfolio Presentation

Each BLW should also be given a copy of their own Resource Kit for BLWs. The kit contains an explanation of their job description and what is required from them in their day-to-day role. It also contains a range of tools that BLWs should be using, including templates of the Work Shadowing Reflection Sheet and Mentoring Agreement Form (see below).



  1. Resource Kit for BLWs
    1. Other BLW Training Methods


Aside from training workshops, other methods can be employed to build the skills and knowledge of BLWs, such as work shadowing (or on-the-job training), and mentoring. Brief descriptions of these supplementary methods are provided below.

Work Shadowing


Work shadowing is an experiential learning method where a BLW observes and participates in hands-on activities with an experienced ALS implementer. It is recommended that each BLW spend a minimum of 15 hours work shadowing before commencing BLW duties. Likewise, it is recommended that the BLW keep a log book documenting hours spent work shadowing and reflecting on their learning experiences. The log book may be checked by the BLWFP. It is also a useful self-reflection tool that may help new BLW recruits remember and improve new skills. Please refer to the Resource Kit for BLWs for a template of the Work Shadowing Reflection Sheet.

Mentoring


Relationships should be formed between School ALS Coordinators and BLWs for the purposes of mentoring. Where a School ALS Coordinator is unavailable or nonexistent the BLWFP should work with the PSDS to find a suitable substitute, such as a formal school teacher, a retired teacher, or former ALS implementer. Mentors should be available to guide those BLWs with little teaching experience, and to provide tools and support relating to teaching methods. Mentors are encouraged to meet with their BLW on a regular basis, in order to assist the BLW in resolving any issues related to their work in ALS. To set up the mentorship between the School ALS Coordinators and the BLWs, it may be necessary for the BLWFP to organize a meeting between these two parties to clarify expectations and responsibilities. Please refer to the Resource Kit for BLWs for a template of the Mentoring Agreement Form.

Enhancement Training


The BLWFP is responsible for ensuring that the BLWs in their district are well-trained and maintain adequate skill levels. Further enhancement training throughout the year should be held to improve knowledge and skills, and to create a sense of community among ALS implementers. The BLWFP is also responsible for ensuring that essential information received from DepEd ALS training is conveyed to the BLWs.
    1. Training Cycle


Successful BLW applicants shall undergo the required orientation(s) and training(s) as soon as possible after selection. Ideally, new BLW recruits should be selected and ready to begin work in January. Therefore, training should occur during November and December the previous year. Work shadowing should occur during the first month of the BLW’s contract, and mentoring should be ongoing throughout the school year.

The DepEd ALS Division conducts multi-phase training once per year, usually around July, which all BLW recruits should attend. BLWs should seek financial assistance from the municipal government or barangay council for transportation, meal, and snack costs.

  1. BLW Program Calendar of Events


  1. Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E), and Reporting


    Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) is an essential component in the management of the BLW Program. M&E tools are used to ensure that the BLW Program achieves its vision and benefits through the prescribed implementation activities. This section discusses the key evaluation questions of ‘implementation’, ‘effectiveness’ and ‘impact’ of the BLW Program and then goes on to summarize various monitoring mechanisms that can be used to gather information for evaluation. Reporting is an essential tool for the communication of results of M&E to those interested in the BLW Program. Below a clear reporting structure is detailed, outlining the information that should be disseminated to each key stakeholder.
    1. BLW Program Evaluation


Broadly defined, evaluation is the assessment and judgement of whether an action has resulted in the intended outcomes and benefits. The evaluation of the BLW Program occurs across three key areas: effectiveness, impact and implementation. These areas have been established based on the BLW Program vision, benefits, and outcomes (see Section 1 of this Manual, Program Vision and Benefits), which are themselves derived from broader DepEd ALS objectives.

The ALS Division Supervisor should monitor the outcomes and benefits of the BLW Program and ensure that these are being realized through the BLW Program implementation activities. If it is repeatedly found that the Program has been unsuccessful in realizing targeted outcomes and benefits, the ALS Division Supervisor should investigate why and adjust implementation strategies accordingly.

The tables below specify a range of questions related to the BLW Program’s effectiveness, impact, and implementation, and indicate how these things can be measured. ALS staff should refer regularly to these tables to help them determine how and to what extent the BLW Program is operating successfully.

To what extent has the BLW Program been effective in increasing literacy rates?


Question

Measure

Monitoring Mechanism

How has the BLW Program contributed to improving basic literacy?

Number of enrolments to BLP through a BLW

MIS 002a

Number of completers of BLP through a BLW

MIS 002a

How has the BLW Program contributed to increasing continuing education?

Elementary




Number of enrolments to A&E Elementary through a BLW

MIS 002a

Number of completers of A&E Elementary program through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of registrants for A&E Elementary test through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of test takers of A&E Elementary through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of passers of A&E Elementary through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

Secondary




Number of enrolments to A&E Secondary through a BLW

MIS 002a

Number of completers of A&E Secondary program through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of registrants for A&E Secondary test through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of test takers of A&E Secondary through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of passers of A&E Secondary through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

To what extent has the BLW program improved awareness of, and access to, ALS programs in the community?

Number of barangays being served

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of school-less barangays being served

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of Persons with Disability (PWDs) enrolled through BLWs

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of BLW Awareness and Advocacy events held

Provincial and Annual Plan Review

Is ALS delivering quality education through BLWs?

Number of BLWs trained

BLW Monitoring Board

Learner Satisfaction with BLW teaching methods

Learner Satisfaction Survey

Number of BLP completers through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of A&E Elementary completers through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of A&E Secondary completers through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of A&E Elementary passers through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of A&E Secondary passers through a BLW

BLW Monitoring Board

To what extent are the government units of CamSur participating in improving literacy within their communities?

Number of ordinances / resolutions passed

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of LCC meetings convened

BLW Monitoring Board

Funding allocated for BLW Program (increasing / decreasing)

Provincial and District Annual Reports


What are the impacts of the BLW Program within the community?


Question

Measure

Monitoring Mechanism

To what extent has the quality of learners’ lives and social status changed?

Most significant change story in this domain

Most Significant Change Stories

To what extent have there been changes to the continuation of the learners’ skills and knowledge development?

Most significant change story in this domain

Most Significant Change Stories

To what extent have there been changes in the learners’ engagement within their communities?

Most significant change story in this domain

Most Significant Change Stories

Are there any unexpected impacts of the BLW Program?

Most significant change story in this domain

Most Significant Change Stories


How well is the BLW Program being implemented?


Question

Measure

Monitoring Mechanism

To what extent is the BLW Program supported by a legal basis?

Provincial ordinance passed

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of municipal ordinances / resolutions passed

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of barangay ordinances / resolutions passed

BLW Monitoring Board

To what extent is there an established partnership between DepEd and Government units?

Number of PLCC meetings held

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of MLCC meetings held

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of BLCC meetings held

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of BLWs with an honorarium

BLW Monitoring Board

Funding allocated for BLW Program (increasing / decreasing)

Provincial and District Annual Reports

To what extent are DepEd staff contributing to the implementation of the BLW Program?

Number of DepEd and ALS staff meeting BLW-related KRAs

Performance Reviews

Number of BLWs recruited

BLW Monitoring Board

Number of BLWs trained

Provincial and District Annual Reports

To what extent are BLWs performing the duties set out for them?

Number of learners per BLW

MIS 002a

Literacy mapping completed

Provincial and District Annual Reports



To what extent is the BLW Program’s effectiveness and impact documented and distributed?

Number of Quarterly and Annual Reports generated

Evidence of Provincial and District Quarterly and Annual Reports

Number of reports forwarded to LCCs

Minutes of PLCC and MLCC meetings / emails

To what extent are the ALS Division Supervisor and BLW Program Coordinator (BLWC) continuously improving the BLW Program implementation?

Review, update and distribution of the manual and toolkit

Updated manual / toolkit, change in date, published on website

Number of ALS implementers who attend biannual refresher training

Attendance sheets and certificates of attendance in ALS implementer accomplishment reports


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