Alone on a Wide Wide Sea



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Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2008.

This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom




Arthur Hobhouse

is a Happening

OHT 1: Chapter 1 title





Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2008.

This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom





I should begin at the beginning. I know that. But the trouble is that I don’t know the beginning. I wish I did. I do know my name, Arthur Hobhouse. Arthur Hobhouse had a beginning, that’s for certain. I had a father and a mother too, but God only knows who they were, and maybe even he doesn’t know for sure. I mean, God can’t be looking everywhere all at once, can he? So where the name Arthur Hobhouse comes from and who gave it to me I have no idea. I don’t even know if it’s my real name. I don’t know the date and place of my birth either, only that it was probably in Bermondsey, London, sometime in about 1940.



Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2008. This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom

OHT 2: Opening paragraph



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Alone on a Wide Wide Sea


esson 2: Hook that reader!



Framework Objectives

Wr1 Plan, draft, edit, revise, proofread and present a text with readers and purpose in mind

Wr5 Structure a story with an arresting opening, a developing plot, a complication, a crisis and a satisfying resolution

Wr7 Use a range of narrative devices to involve the reader

S&L1 Use talk as a tool for clarifying ideas

Thesauruses and dictionaries should be available to students in this lesson.

Starter


  • Look back at Lesson 1 and remind students of how they formed a number of questions about the first chapter of the novel from reading the opening. Recap the discussion from the Plenary, and note that making a reader ask questions is one of several key ways to hook them into a story.

  • Put students into pairs or groups of three. Give each pair or group a set of cut-up cards from Worksheet 3. They can then work to match each of the hooks with an example. Take feedback and write the seven different kinds of hook on the board.

Introduction


  • Explain to the class that different writers and readers prefer different narrative hooks. However, they will need to try all different kinds of opening if they are to develop as writers.

  • Distribute Worksheet 4. Using the notes they made about an early memory for Lesson 1 homework as a basis, students write opening sentences using each style of narrative hook. (The number of styles they are asked to attempt can be differentiated according to ability.)

  • Students share their work within their previous pairs and groups. Then, as a class, discuss their findings. Which openings did they think were most successful, and which were particularly difficult or easy to write?

Development


  • Students develop one or more of their styles into an opening paragraph, story outline and, if time allows, a full story. (Higher ability students could be encouraged to develop more of their openings.) Before they begin writing, point out that what informs a writer’s decision when choosing how to open a piece of writing is their consideration of purpose and audience. The purpose of narrative writing is to entertain and inform. The audience, in this case, will be their classmates (however, language should be kept fairly formal rather than colloquial).

Plenary


  • Students read their work to each other in their pairs/threes and discuss. Gather feedback from groups to identify which styles suited which writers/stories.

  • Ask students how they will use these ideas in future writing? (Aim to discuss purpose and audience again).



Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2008.

This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom



Worksheet 3: Narrative hooks





Narrative hook

Example

The Puzzler – raises questions that puzzle the reader

I’m never really sure if it’s a real memory or just something that’s become more solid over time. But I’m sure that my brother once tried to murder me.

The Salesperson – stops the reader in their tracks and addresses them directly

So you want to know all about me? Well, stay there and I’ll begin…

The Hinter – the subtle approach, drops hints so the reader has to put the pieces together

It wasn’t as if we hated each other. I don’t really think he knew what he was doing. I wasn’t much better.

The Weatherman – sets the atmosphere

The sky was dark, the pavements shining with drizzle and reflected lights from lamp-posts and car headlights. I sploshed along in my cosy wellies.

The Painter – paints a visual image of the scene

My bright red wellies shone as they splashed through the puddles on the black tar pavement. Multi-coloured cars raced past, cutting through the drizzle and the dark of the winter…

The Comedianthe funny approach

Being splashed by a car so comprehensively that you are soaked to your underwear is really funny. Unless it happens to you.

The Interrupter – brings you in during a conversation

I can’t believe he did that! What happened next?” Liz demanded…


Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2008.

This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom



Have a go at using each Narrative Hook by writing an opening sentence in each of the different styles. You may find that you need to change your opening focus as well as your style.

Worksheet 4: Opening lines





The Puzzler – raises questions that puzzle the reader

The Salesperson – stops the reader in their tracks and addresses them directly

The Hinter – the subtle approach, drops hints so the reader has to put the pieces together

The Weatherman – sets the atmosphere

The Painter – paints a visual image of the scene

The Comedian – the funny approach

The Interrupter – brings you in during a conversation

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Alone on a Wide Wide Sea


esson 3: What’s in a name?

Framework Objectives

R8 Infer and deduce meanings using evidence in the text

R14 Recognise how writers’ language choices can enhance meaning

S13a Revise the stylistic conventions of information writing

Wr11 Select and present information using detail, example, diagram and illustration as appropriate

Students should have read up to ‘Wes Snarkey’s revenge’ (page 40)

Starter


  • Show OHT 3 and ask students to unpick the names and phrases.

  • Discuss how the language adds meaning to them – introduce concept of denotation and connotation.

  • Add the name ‘Piggy Bacon’ and ask students to unpick and explain how its difference warns the readers about this character.

Introduction


  • Ask students what they would expect an instruction text to do, i.e. it tells you (how) to do something. What key features they would expect of an instruction text, if any? (Expect answers including: Heading, sub-headings, sequenced lists, illustrations with captions, connectives for cohesion, subject-specific vocabulary, imperative verbs).

  • Either show OHT 4 or a relevant text of your own choice and ask students to identify these features.

  • Keep a list of them on the board.

Development


  • Imagine a new batch of children are being delivered to Cooper’s Station. Students have to write the instructions that will help them to survive it. They should remember these are instructions to children from children – they won’t been seen by Piggy Bacon or his wife. Students should draw on as much info from the text as possible.

  • They need to remind themselves of the conditions and try to use the conventions of instruction writing.

Plenary


  • Use the peer-evaluation sheet to assess the writing (Worksheet 5)

  • Look at the vocabulary used – does it keep the writing impartial or does it hint at the horrors at Cooper’s Station?

Homework
Change the writing into a different non-fiction piece, using the appropriate conventions. Ask students to now write an advert written by Mr Bacon to persuade children to come and work at Cooper’s Station.


Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2008.

This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom






Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2006.

This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom



Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2006.

This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom




M

OHT 3: What’s in a name?


ighty Marty

Silver dancing dolphins
Lady Luck


Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2008.

This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom





Starting school: how to do it perfectly

  1. Establish what time you are meant to be there and what you are meant to take.

  2. Ensure you have the correct school uniform. Shirts must be tucked in and ties should be tied correctly (see diagram).

  3. Take a full pencil case which should include:

    • Blue and black pens (check they work)

    • Ruler

    • Pencils (sharp)

    • Highlighters

    • Rubber

    • Sharpener

    • Paper clips (really useful for keeping all the little bits of paper together)

  4. Take a small dictionary, reading book and notebook in your bag. These are guaranteed to impress teachers.

  5. Take a packed lunch, but also take some cash in case your new friends are going to the canteen – this means you can stick with them and get yourself a drink or snack.

  6. Have a good night’s sleep the night before and get a good breakfast.

  7. Try to enjoy it!



Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2008. This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom

OHT 4: How to have a perfect start to school



Worksheet 5: Peer-Assessment sheet

Date:

Name:


Class:

The assignment involved...

What were the good points about the writing?

What needs to be improved?

Writing overview:

Focus

Poor

Average

Good

V Good

Sentence structure and punctuation (the way your sentences are put together; the accuracy and effect of your use of punctuation)













Text structure and organisation

(the way your writing is organised; for example, whether your paragraphs help the reader to follow what you want to say)















Composition and effect (the particular choices of words and phrases used to fit the sort of text you are writing) plus how well you interest the reader.













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Alone on a Wide Wide Sea


esson 4: How do you feel?

Framework Objectives

W15 Use a dictionary and a thesaurus with speed and skill

Wr2 Collect, select and assemble ideas in a suitable planning format

Wr3 Use writing to explore and develop ideas

S&L13 Work together logically and methodically to solve problems, make deductions, share, test and evaluate ideas.

Small squares of paper/sticky notes and thesauruses and dictionaries are required for this lesson.

Students should have read up to the end of ‘Couple of Raggedy Little Scarecrows’ (page 106).


Starter


  • Put students into groups of three of four, each student with a thesaurus and dictionary and a stack of small squares of paper (or sticky notes)

  • They are to undertake a vocabulary race. Each team has to find and write down as many words describing emotions as possible in three minutes. One word is to be written on each piece of paper/sticky note. Remind them they can use the thesaurus to find new words but they also need the dictionary to check exact meaning. (Might be worth reminding them of the terms synonym and antonym).

  • When they are done, share some of their favourites and check understanding. As a group they now need to organise their word bank – they can arrange the vocabulary into a mind map or a shape that means similar emotions are together. You might want to give them sugar paper to glue these onto.

Introduction


  • Show OHT 5 and, as a class, sketch the changing emotions Arthur has experienced since the start of the novel. The line should go up and down according to emotional intensity and students should label where individual emotions such as happiness or fear occur on this line.

  • Ask the group to divide these experiences between them and allocate appropriate vocabulary from their word bank. (You might like to differentiate for students at this point, or allow them to self-differentiate).

Development


  • Students are to write a personal recount of their experience, as if they are Arthur. However, they need to try to use some of their new vocabulary.

Plenary


  • Each group puts their pieces together and crafts it to ensure it works.

  • Ask: Have the new words helped or have they gone a bit over the top?

  • Ask: Should there be a rule about using new vocabulary?

  • Lead a discussion about this.


Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2008.

This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom



OHT 5: Emotion chart





Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2008.

This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom



On the boat

Cooper’s Station

Journey to Cooper’s Station

Journey with the Aborigines

Meeting Aunty Megs

Lesson 5: Analysing character



Framework Objectives

R12 Comment, using appropriate terminology on the how writers convey setting, character and mood through word choice and sentence structure

Wr11 Select and present information using detail example, diagram and illustration as appropriate

Wr19 Write reflectively about a text, taking account of the needs of others who might read it

S12 Organise ideas into a coherent sequence of paragraphs, introducing, developing and concluding them appropriately.

Students should have read up to the end of ‘You’re my Boys, Aren’t You?’ (page 139).

Starter


  • Show OHT6 and ask students what it tells us about Aunty Megs. Remind them of the connotations of what is said – they often have to read between and beyond the lines.

  • Can they find a phrase or short quotation that tells us something about Aunty Megs? Ask students to explain what they have chosen and why they have chosen it to a learning partner.

Introduction


  • Remind students of the PEE rule (Point, Evidence, Explanation). The quotations they have been working with act as the evidence and the unpicking they have been doing is the explanation. All they need to do is add a point to create an analytical paragraph.

  • Model this or use OHT7 to show students how this works. Get them to identify the different parts of the paragraph.

  • Mini plenary: Why are quotations needed in analysis paragraphs?

Development


  • Students write a series of analysis paragraphs about Aunty Megs using the PEE Rule.

  • They should aim to explore the following:

    • Her character and personality

    • Her behaviour and beliefs

    • Her relationship with the boys

    • How the author prepares us for what might happen in the future.

  • You might like to display OHT8 which has these ideas and some phrases that might help the students analyse their chosen quotations.

Plenary


  • Hear and evaluate some of the paragraphs.

  • As a class, write the rules for successful analytical paragraphs.

  • Lead a discussion about the hints that the author has given us about what might happen next – why and how has he done this?

Homework

Find and note down places in the book where the author gives us hints of what is going to happen in the future.

Extension: why has he done this?


Alone on a Wide Wide Sea Scheme of Work © HarperCollins Publishers 2008.

This page may be photocopied for use in the classroom



OHT 6: Aunty Megs



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Alone on a Wide Wide Sea


he made it perfectly clear that this wasn’t an excuse in sentimentality, wasn’t just to make herself feel good. It was to give them a second chance of life, a chance they all deserved. It was a chance everyone deserved, she said, animals and people alike.

OHT 7: Analysing Aunty Megs

Aunty Megs is direct and matter-of-fact, ‘this wasn’t an exercise in sentimentality, wasn’t just to make herself feel good.’ This shows us that she has real purpose to her actions and she has thought about what she is doing. It also tells us that she has the strength to do what she feels is right rather than what she would prefer to do – this makes us think about what might happen to Arthur and Marty in the future.

OHT8: Analysing Aunty Megs

Write about



    • Her character and personality

    • Her behaviour and beliefs

    • Her relationship with the boys

    • How the author prepares us for what might happen in the future.

You might like to use some of these phrases to help analyse the quotations you have chosen:

This shows...

This tells us...

These words suggest...

From this we can see...

This language is ______ and suggests...

This implies...

She seems to be...

We can see that...

This suggests...

Lesson 6: Leading the reader through

Framework Objectives

S8 Recognise the cues to start a new paragraph and use the first sentence effectively to orientate the reader

S12 Organise ideas into a coherent sequence of paragraphs, introducing, developing and concluding them appropriately

W20 Expand the range of link words and phrases used to signpost texts

Wr10 Organise texts in ways appropriate to their content and signpost this clearly to the reader.

Students should have completed the task in lesson 5.

Starter


  • Show students OHT9 and ask them to write the connectives in the correct categories on Worksheet6

  • Lead discussion of why connectives are useful – they act as warning flags so your reader knows what is about to happen in your writing.

  • Check understanding of each one.

Introduction


  • Ask students to look back at their analysis paragraphs about Aunty Megs. They’ll probably find they stand alone rather than flow. This is where connectives can be really useful as they can help cohesion and coherence – inside and between paragraphs.

  • Challenge students to work out how connectives can make the analysis on OHT 10 better.

Development


  • Students to work in pairs or small groups to craft their analysis and use connectives to improve the cohesion and coherence.



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