Aire application & Prep Packet Name



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AIRE Application & Prep Packet

Name________________________________________________


County_______________________________________________

District _______________________________________________



READ CAREFULLY: This application should be filled out in detail. Please print or type.

Four (4) copies of the application & all required components should be submitted. * Note: The applicant’s packets should be submitted in individual folders with the applicant’s name and county appearing on the outside or tab on each folder.

Mail to: Dr. Mitzi Downing, Assistant State 4-H & FCS Program Leader, Campus Box 7655 NCSU Raleigh, NC 27695-7655.

* Fed Ex or UPS Address: 520 Brickhaven Rd. Raleigh, NC 27606

Postmarked no later than - May 15, 2017

Please rank the 4-H Programs in the order of your preference to attend (1st being your top selection, 2nd being your next and 3rd being your final program of choice). *If you have attended one or more of the programs below please indicate so by placing an “X” in the ranking column.

( ) National 4-H Congress – Is held in November. Interview at NC 4-H Congress - Spending money is needed.

( ) National 4-H Conference – Is held in March/April. Interview at NC 4-H Congress. The actual cost to the 4-H’er is $100 plus spending money.

( ) National Leadership Conference – Is held in June: Interview at NC 4-H Congress - The 4-H’er pays all travel cost, except registration. *Trip is for June 2018

The North Carolina 4-H Program is an equal opportunity program. You may request any needed accommodations to participate in the application or interview process.

Please limit your answers to the space provided.

*NATIONAL CONGRESS APPLICANTS ONLY: Please rank the curriculum categories in which you want to compete by placing a rank order in the box. Example: Citizenship & Civic Education = 1, Communications Arts = 2, etc. You may select up to 3 curriculum category options. Under Animal Science, please circle if you are applying for Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Sheep, or Swine.

*National 4-H Conference and ILC Applicants do not select curriculum categories.

GENERAL CATEGORIES FOR NATIONAL CONGRESS

Animal Science _____ (Select Area)

___Beef ___Dairy ___Poultry___Sheep ____Swine



Citizenship & Civic Education _____

Communication Arts _____

Environmental Science _____

Healthy Lifestyles (Peanuts, Nutrition, Breads etc. _____


Leadership, Citizenship, Community & Public Service _____


Leadership & Personal Dev. _____

Plant Science ________

Science & Technology _____





AIRE Applicant Information
Name:

Last First Middle


Home

Address: Gender:

City: State: NC Zip Code: Telephone:

County: District: Email:

Years Date

In 4-H: Age: of Birth:




PREVIOUS AIRE EXPERIENCE REQUIRED PARTS OF YOUR APPLICATION

I have received an AIRE Trip in the past: Application & Signatures: __________

–––––– Yes Essay: __________

­ If so, what year _________ Resume: ________


and trip_____________________________? Interview: ________ (I plan to participate)

_______ No




Certification Statement:

I certify that the information on this application is accurate and complete. These events operate under the NC 4-H Code of Conduct and Disciplinary Procedure Guidelines. Please be sure you have read this document.



http://www.nc4h.org/publications/forms/4-H_codeofconduct.pdf

Should I be selected to represent North Carolina at a National Event, I promise to abide by all rules.

Signature of 4-H’er Date



Signature of Parent Date



Signature of 4-H Agent Date



AIRE Personal Essay

(Select 1 of the 2 essay prompts below and submit it with your AIRE Packet.)


PROMPT # 1: “Reflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you make the same decision again?”

Keep in mind how open-ended this prompt truly is. The "belief or idea" you explore could be your own, someone else's, or that of a group. The best essays will be honest as they explore the difficulty of working against the status quo or a firmly held belief, and the answer to the final question--would you make the same decision again--need not be "yes." Sometimes in retrospection we discover that the cost of an action was perhaps too great. However you approach this prompt, your essay needs to reveal one of your core personal values. If the belief you challenged doesn't give the reader a window into your personality, then you haven't succeeded with this prompt.


PROMPT #2: “Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma--anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.”
This question is beautiful and broad. Here again, you have a lot of options for approaching the question. With the ability to write about an "intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma," you can essentially write about any issue that you find important. Note that you do not have to have solved the problem, and some of the best essays will explore problems that need to be solved in the future. Be careful with that opening word "describe"--you'll want to spend much more time analyzing the problem than describing it. This essay prompt, like the options, is asking you to be introspective and share with the reader what it is that you value.
Which Essay Prompt Should You Choose?

You should choose the essay prompt that best allows you to tell the readers something about you that they won’t get from your high school transcript or test scores. Note that these are all “touchy-feely” topics, not questions about your SAT scores or where you placed in the Math Olympics.

This type of reflection can be difficult (the hardest topic to write about is usually you!), but just know that college admissions officers aren’t perfect, they know you’re not perfect, and you’re frankly more interesting when you show something other than how perfect you are. It’s okay to reveal a weakness or a fear, or to share something that seems silly, as long as it helps admissions officers feel like they got to know you better and it makes it easier for them to imagine you walking around their campus a year or two from now. Being real is better than simply being impressive.

Essay Word Limits

You can submit only one essay, and it must be no more than 650 words. You don’t need to use all 650 words… “650 words is your limit, not your goal.” If you can tell your story in an impactful way in just 400 words, then great. Note that there is a minimum word limit: 250 words so, don’t cut yourself too short.



Essay Instructions for the AIRE Process

Submit your essay on a separate piece of paper using the following formatting requirements.



  • Type your paper on a computer and print it out on standard, white 8.5 x 11-inch paper.

  • Create a header that numbers all pages consecutively in the upper right-hand corner.

  • Double-space the text of your paper, and use a legible font (e.g. Times New Roman). Whatever font you choose, MLA recommends that the regular and italics type styles contrast enough that they are recognizable one from another.

  • The font size should be 12 pt.

  • Leave only one space after periods or other punctuation marks.

  • Set the margins of your document to 1 inch on all sides.

  • In the upper left-hand corner of the first page, list your name, your county, and the year.

  • The selected prompt (essay question) should be copied and pasted below your demographic information.

  • Give your essay a title. Double space between the title and the first line of the text.

  • Essay’s should be no more than 650 words and no less than 250.

Use the “Essay Brainstorming Worksheet” to help you get started and gain comfort in writing personal essays. Be creative. Be yourself. Don’t forget to give your essay a title, and proofread (ask a friend, parent or teacher to proofread your essay for content and grammar).



Essay Brainstorming Worksheet

Essays are generally about one thing. You! Most essay questions are designed for one reason “to tell the reader about you.” Here’s a simple brainstorming worksheet that you can use to prepare for writing essays. You’ll discover your strengths and weakness as you move through the topics.



  1. Ask a few family members or friends to describe you. Use adjectives or personality traits.

____________________________________

____________________________________

____________________________________

____________________________________



  1. List at least three to five things you feel knowledgeable about and that you could give a speech or presentation on.

____________________________________

____________________________________

____________________________________

____________________________________

____________________________________


  1. What five people have influenced you the most and why?

____________________________________

____________________________________

____________________________________

____________________________________

____________________________________


  1. What is you favorite book or movie, and why?



  1. In chronological order, what are the five most important / memorable events in the story of your life?



  1. What is favorite quote? Write it down and explain why it’s meaningful to you.



  1. Write an “Opening Sentence:” Write a compelling opening sentence. Ask yourself, “Does it distinguish me from others I know?”

S
Sample Essay

1

am Clover



Clover County

2015


Prompt #*10: “Share with the reader a page out of your autobiography.”

Wisdom: page 217 of my autobiography (title of the essay)

The image was one of kindness, warmth, and love. The sliver lines of her hair shimmered in the sunlight, and the pale wrinkled cheeks smoother when she smiled. I sat there beaming at her. She sat there smiling at me. Life was simple.

“Beep, Beep, Beep” the machine interrupted. It commanded my attention. Sitting at the side of the bed, my eyes became alert once more, glancing at my grandmother. “Why did this have to happen now? She was recovering from lung cancer. Now, hepatitis too?”

Glancing at her hands made me reminisce. Hands that had helped me to reach the ice cream sandwiches my tiny fingers couldn’t quite grasp. Hands that had knitted my doll’s clothes, my baby blanket, my bright tri-colored scarves. Hands that had come together in prayer at my grandfather’s funeral. How many times had I held those hands? I saw the ring in her hand. I remembered the scene earlier, when she had tried to give me the ring, telling me to take it before she passed away. At that time I could see the frightened child in her. She was not ready.

I had been so busy over the years placing the urgent over the important. I thought of all those letters unwritten, phone calls unmade, and visits forgotten, while I was stressing about tennis matches, homework, and friends. Everything was so trivial.

Looking at her face, I saw the resemblance to my own mother. Imagine the hurt my mom must be going through. Losing a mother is one of the greatest pains in the world, a knife wound to the heart. I remember the stories of my mother as a child, always asking the unanswerable question and dreaming to be the successful professional. Those were similar stories I had also heard about myself. How I longed to hear another story. Reaching out my hand to touch her forehead, I saw her eyelids flutter open, revealing mocha coffee colored eyes that held warmth, sprinkled with sweet love. “Still sharp,” I thought to myself.

“We were wrong,” the doctor said. All three came into the room to apologize, too happy to be ashamed. “The results turned out to be negative. You don’t have . . . “ The man’s voice was interrupted by clapping. My grandmother sat smiling like a young puppy.

Functional Resume
A functional resume focuses on your skills and experiences, rather than on your chronological 4-H History. It is used most often by youth who are involved in a variety of 4-H programs, youth who have less than five years of 4-H experiences, or youth who wish to focus on their experiences and skills vs. leadership positions and previous accomplishments.
I. Header: Name, address, email address, phone number

II. Professional Statement: This is a short statement describing your career aspirations (including college / work plans). OR

AIRE Summary Statement: This is a short statement that describes your purpose for applying (state what trip you are applying for and what subject area). You can briefly mention your 4-H career highlights, including past roles and your strongest skills.

III. Education: This contains middle school / high school or college information, expected date of graduation and course of study. Include academic honors.

IV. 4-H Project Experience: For each project or activity, format it after the following example and include:

• Amount of time you were involved, • size, scope of project,

• extent and diversity of knowledge and skills, • reflection of competency,

• extent and level of responsibilities, personal growth,

• how you extended your knowledge into your community

V. 4-H Citizenship & Leadership Experience: In this section, provide information about 4-H related activities in the areas of citizenship and leadership.
VI. Community Service, Citizenship & Leadership Experience: Organizations: In this section, provide information about activities within 4-H and non 4-H in the areas of community service. Format it after the following example and include: the duration and extent of your involvement,

• your roles and responsibilities, the size and scope of your effort,

• time spent, impact and resources committed, and what you accomplished individually or as a team.

Chronological Resume
A chronological resume starts by listing your 4-H history, with the most recent position listed first. Your leadership positions are listed in reverse chronological order with your current, or most recent position, first. This type of resume works well for youth with a strong, solid 4-H history.
I. Header: Name, address, email address, phone number
II. Professional Statement: This is a short statement describing your career aspirations (including college / work plans). OR

AIRE Summary Statement: This is a short statement that describes your purpose for applying (state what trip you are applying for and what subject area). You can briefly mention your 4-H career highlights, including past roles and your strongest skills.
III. 4-H Project Experience: Begin with your most recent major 4-H accomplishments and continue backward to report your 4-H history. List and explain accomplishments (briefly) including dates and level (county, district, state, etc.).


  • Try to begin each bulleted sentence with an action word.

  • Write about your experience and skills to aim toward the accomplishment.

  • Provide the most information about your most recent accomplishment. For example: write a brief description consisting of a few sentences followed by a short list of bulleted items.

  • Show growth and progress with responsibilities.

  • Stress achievements and accomplishments.


IV. Education: This contains middle school / high school or college information, expected date of graduation and course of study. Include academic honors.
V. 4-H Citizenship & Leadership Experience: In this section, provide information about 4-H related activities in the areas of citizenship and leadership.
VI. Community Service, Citizenship & Leadership Experience: In this section, provide information about activities you’ve been involved within 4-H and non 4-H in the areas of community service. Format it after the following example and include: the duration and extent of your involvement,

• your roles and responsibilities, the size and scope of your effort,

• time spent, impact and resources committed, and what you accomplished individually or as a team.

Combination Resume
A combination resume lists your skills and experience first. Your 4-H history is listed next. With this type of resume you can highlight the skills you have that are relevant to the 4-H trip you are applying for, and also provide the chronological 4-H history reviewers prefer.


  1. Header: Name, address, email address, phone number




  1. Professional Statement: This is a short statement describing your career aspirations (including college / work plans). OR

AIRE Summary Statement: This is a short statement that describes your purpose for applying (state what trip you are applying for and what subject area). You can briefly mention your 4-H career highlights, including past roles and your strongest skills.
III. Summary of Qualifications: Statement that describes your expertise, leadership abilities, and skill set. The summary should give the reviewer an idea of who you are, except it allows you to focus more on your 4-H experience than on your goals. You can briefly mention your 4-H career highlights, including past roles and your strongest skills.
IV. Accomplishments: Begin with your most recent major 4-H accomplishments and continue backward to report your successes in 4-H, school, work and / or volunteer service.
V. 4-H Experience: In bulleted format outline your 4-H experiences, starting with the most recent and significant.

VI. Education: This contains middle school / high school or college information, expected date of graduation and course of study. Include academic honors.
VII. 4-H Community Service, Citizenship & Leadership Experience: In this section, provide information about 4-H and non 4-H related activities in the areas of community service, citizenship and leadership.

Examples of Action Words

Expanded

Presented

Negotiated

Operated


Evaluated

Invented


Established

Supervised

Analyzed

Organized

Exhibited

Prepared


Maintained

Handled


Taught

Directed


Developed

Designed


Administered

Improved


Trained

Reorganized

Edited

Produced


Contacted

Conducted

Planned

Managed


Created

Supported

Researched

Implemented



15 College Interview Questions You Should Know

  1. What do you consider your greatest strengths and weaknesses?

  2. How do you handle criticism?

  3. How do you plan to achieve your career goals?

  4. What defines you?

  5. What is your proudest achievement?

  6. Why do you want to attend our college / take part in our program / work here, etc.?

  7. How did you spend last summer?

  8. What's the most difficult situation you've faced?

  9. If you could change one thing about your high school, what would it be?

  10. How do you respond to academic demands and pressure?

  11. Which authors, books or articles have had a profound impact on you?

  12. If you could take a year off, what would you do and why?

  13. How would your friends describe you?

  14. What has been your most challenging leadership experience?

  15. What do you plan to major in and why?

15 College Interview Questions You Should Ask Your Interviewer

  1. What are the most popular majors / colleges on campus?

  2. How does the advising system work?

  3. What are the students here like?

  4. How are roommates matched?

  5. How many students in last year's freshman class returned for their sophomore year?

  6. What is the relationship between those who belong to the Greek system and those who don't?

  7. What are some of the issues that concern students on campus? Howa re these issues being resolved?

  8. Are there any big changes in store for campus? Construction Projects (are there any underway or slated to begin – if so, when and where)?

  9. What activities are available for freshmen to meet other students?

  10. What are the weekends like?

  11. Library and Lab hours of operation? Other special services?

  12. What are the big campus events during the year?

  13. What do alumni say about the school?

  14. What do current students like the most about school?

  15. What type of crime (criminal activity) has taken place on campus the last year years?

College Interview Mistakes

  1. Be Late. Admissions people are busy. Alumni interviewers are probably taking time out of their full-time jobs to meet with you. Lateness disrupts schedules and shows irresponsibility on your part. If you can’t avoid being late – call and let the interview know of your situation and ask to either reschedule or push your interview time back to a comfortable time.

  2. Under dress. Business casual is your safest bet, but the main thing is to look neat and put-together. You'll look like you don’t care if you show up wearing ripped jeans or and a vintage t-shirt.

  3. Talk to Little. Your interviewer wants to get to know you. If you answer every question with a "yes," "no," or a grunt, you're not impressing anyone, and you're not demonstrating that you can contribute to the intellectual life of the campus. On the flip side – don’t be a babbling brook – answer the questions and be yourself but don’t dominate the conversation.

  4. Chew Gum. It's distracting and annoying.

  5. Bring your parents. The interviewer wants to get to know you, not your parents. Also, it's hard to look like you're mature enough for college if Dad is asking all the questions for you.

  6. Lie. This should be obvious, but some students do get themselves in trouble by fabricating half-truths or exaggerating during the interview. Remember they have SEEN your grades and your test scores as well as your reference letters.

  7. Fail to research the college. If you ask questions that could easily be answered by the college's website, you'll send the message that you don't care enough about the school to do a little research. Ask questions that show you know the place: "I'm interested in your Honors Program; could you tell me more about it?"

  8. Be rude. Good manners go a long way. Shake hands. Address your interviewer by name. Say "thank you." Introduce your parents if they are in the waiting area. Say "thank you" again. Send a handwritten thank you note.

­­­­­

Format for the AIRE Interview


The one–on–one interview is designed to strengthen the applicant’s interview skills, and for the selection committee to get to know individual applicant’s. Each applicant will have approximately 10 -12 minutes with the selection committee. The selection committee will focus on getting to know as much information about each candidate as possible. Applicants should be prepared to share information about their 4-H experiences, high school and community experiences, family, career goals, educational plans, and personal beliefs.

Interview Process


  • Applicant enters room, introduces him/herself to the interview team and sits in the chair. Each applicant will make a one (1) minute for an opening statement about him/herself.




  • Committee members will begin the interview process immediately following the applicants opening statement.




  • The selection committee will ask questions from the list below (Critical Thinking, Cause/Effect, Behavioral & General 4-H) as well as, questions that arise from the interview process itself.




  • Each applicant will be given the opportunity to make closing remarks and to thank the committee for their time.



Making an Opening Statement


  • Briefly, tell us about yourself.

    • Include things like: Who are you? What are you passionate about? Why you chose to in 4-H. How has 4-H impacted your life? What national trip you’re interested in and why?



Making an Closing Statement


  • Wrap-up and/or follow-up on any questions that you feel need a final concluding remark (re: your time with the interview team).

    • Thank the interview team for their time and attention.

AIRE Interview Question Pool

Critical Thinking


  1. Currently, 32% of NC public school students drop out of high school. What do you think should be done by administrators, parents and communities to reduce this alarming number?

  2. Our society has become much more conscience of the food we eat from both a safety and nutritional perspective. Whose responsibility is it to protect the US food supply and how far should we go with this protection?

  3. NC is experiencing a teacher shortage. Why is this a problem and what must we do to attract and retain quality individuals to teach?

  4. What can the school system do to prevent students from bringing weapons to school aside from using metal detectors?

  5. What are your goals in life?  (Career, Personal, etc)

  6. The Governor has chosen you to accompany her to the National Governor’s conference to speak on concerns of the youth in our nation.  What concerns would you share?

  7. If chosen to go on a volunteer mission to another country, what country would you choose and why? What volunteer work would you do based on the needs of the country?

  8. What are your strengths and weakness'?

  9. What is favorite quote? Explain why it’s meaningful to you.

  10. What do you expect to be doing in five years?

  11. Which is more important: creativity or efficiency? Why?

Cause/Effect


  1. Tell me about a time in your life when you had to make a tough decision? What was the situation and how did you handle it?

  2. Give me an example of a time when you had to show personal integrity?

  3. Describe your work ethic.

  4. Give me an example of a time when you used your fact-finding skills to solve a problem.

Behavioral


  1. What form of punishment would you recommend for students with behavior problems in school?

  2. If you could take a year off, what would you do and why?

  3. How are you involved in your community?

  4. Tell me about a time when you were forced to make an unpopular decision.

General 4-H Questions

How can you use your 4-H experience to help encourage more youth to become citizen leaders in their communities?


  1. Share one of your most memorable 4-H experiences. What made it memorable?

  2. Why should we (judges) select you for one of these National trips? And, if you are selected to attend, how do you plan to use the knowledge you gained in your county, district, and state?

  3. Has your 4-H experience had an impact on your life? Be specific.

  4. You have been awarded a million dollar grant to spend on 4-H youth programs, how would you spend this money?

  5. What type of 4-H involvement do you plan for the coming year?

  6. Give us an example of a time when you set a goal in 4-H and were able to meet or achieve it.

  7. Which “H” (Head, Heart, Hands, Health) has had the most significant impact on your life and why?

North Carolina AIRE

Essay Score Sheet

Name: County:

Possible Points Actual Points

General Appearance 2

& Use of Format Requirements

Creative Content 5

Organization 5

Use of Language 3

Grammar, Spelling & 5

Sentence Structure

TOTAL 20

North Carolina AIRE

Resume Score Sheet

Name: County:

Possible Points Actual Points

General Appearance 5


Page limit (2), neatness, easy to read,

Distinct margins, font size

Professional Statement Career aspiration if know and/or field of study 2

4-H Project Experience 10

4-H Community Service, 8

Citizenship & Leadership

Non 4-H Community Service, 3

Citizenship & Leadership

Education 2

TOTAL 30


North Carolina AIRE

Interview Score Sheet

Name: County:

Possible Points Actual Points


PERSONAL APPEARANCE 3

& ATTIRE

OPENING/CLOSING REMARKS 6


4-H KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS 15

DEMONSTRATED (as reflected

in resume and through interview)

ABILITY TO RESPOND TO 9

YOUTH ISSUES

ABILITY TO RESPOND TO 7

CURRENT EVENTS

POISE/CONFIDENCE LEVEL 10

ABILITY TO ARTICULATE

TOTAL 50


Questions about the AIRE Application Packet and support materials can be sent directly to:
Dr. Mitzi Downing

Campus Box 7655

NCSU

Raleigh, NC 27695-7655



Tele: 919.515.8487

Email: mitzi_downing@ncsu.edu

Developed by:

M. Downing, Assistant State 4-H & FCS Program Leader

NC 4-H Youth Development

NC State University






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