Advanced filipino abroad 2008-2011 a proposal to The U. S. Department of Education Fulbright-Hays, Group Projects Abroad for Advanced language study at De La Salle University in Dasmariñas, Cavite, Philippines



Download 87.42 Kb.
Page1/3
Date19.02.2017
Size87.42 Kb.
  1   2   3
ADVANCED FILIPINO ABROAD 2008-2011

A Proposal to

The U.S. Department of Education

Fulbright-Hays, Group Projects Abroad

for Advanced language study

at De La Salle University in Dasmariñas, Cavite, Philippines
Table of Contents

1. Plan of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

1.1 Sponsorship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

1.2 Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

1.3 Testing and selection of participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

1.3a Criteria for selection of participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

1.4 On-site preparation and orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

1.5 Teacher training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

1.6 In-country administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

1.7 Program of study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

1.8 Curriculum topics and activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

1.8a Student schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

1.8b Description of daily schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

1.9 Materials and methods used in the program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

2. Quality of Key Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

3. Budget and Cost Effectiveness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

4. Evaluation Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

5. Adequacy of Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

5.1 Description of the De La Salle University-Dasmariñas . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

6. Impact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

6.1 Impact on Philippine studies and the study of Filipino . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

7. Relevance to Institutional Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

8. Need for Overseas Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

8.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

8.2 Need for advanced Filipino overseas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

8.3 Potential participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

8.4 Need for an in-country language program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

9. Program Priorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

9.1 Absolute priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

9.2 Competitive priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

9.2.1 Strengths of the program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

9.2.2 Weaknesses of the program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34



1. Plan of Operation

1.1 Sponsorship

This program will be administered by the Division of Languages, Linguistics and Literature at the University of Hawai`i (UH) and the De La Salle University (DLSU) in Dasmariñas, Cavite, Philippines. As in the 2007 Advanced Filipino Abroad Program (AFAP) project, in 2008, Dr. Ruth Mabanglo, the project director, assisted by Dr. Teresita V. Ramos will coordinate the work at the University of Hawai`i and undertake any preliminary preparations. Unlike previous Advanced Filipino Abroad programs, the new cycle will split the work of the in-country director into two—one to handle administration solely and the other concentrates on language coordination. It has been found that the coordination of the teaching aspect of the program suffers due to the administrative duties of the same person. Dr. Mabanglo will consult regularly with Dr. Myrna Torreliza, Chair of the Department of Filipino and Literature, DLSU-Dasmariñas, who will be responsible for the administration of AFAP. Dr. Teresita F. Fortunato, Professor of Filipino, DLSU-Manila as Language Coordinator of AFAP, will be responsible for the on-site training of teachers, curriculum development, and testing of students. Dr. Ramos will assist in working on the numerous correspondence involved in preparing for the program such as publicity, selection of candidates, travel arrangements, notification, pre-departure orientation, and writing of the final report. Dr. Fortunato will assist in the selection of teachers and in the planning and the execution of the language program. Dr. Torreliza and the members of the DLSU staff will handle the logistics of setting up the program. The project directors will be present on the site to supervise the program and monitor the day-by-day activities.

In addition to the University of Hawai`i, which has regular Filipino programs, the Southeast Asian Studies National Resource Center (NRC) universities (University of California at Berkeley, University of California at Los Angeles, University of Michigan, Northern Illinois University, University of Wisconsin, University of Washington, Cornell University, and Ohio University) enthusiastically support this project (see Appendix 3-A, Letters of Support). Other non-NRC institutions that offer Filipino courses, such as San Francisco State University, City College of San Francisco, New York University, Stanford University, University of San Francisco, University of Pennsylvania, University of Pittsburgh, Loyola Marymount University, University of California at Riverside, University of California at Hayward, University of Florida, Mesa Community College, Delta Community College, Southwestern Community College, Palomar Community College, Leeward Community College, and Kapiolani Community College also support this project.
1.2 Preparation

Packets containing posters and announcements about the project will be sent to all universities having Southeast Asian Studies programs during the fall semester. The project will be announced at foreign language conferences such as the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) in November 2007 and the Hawai`i Association of Language Teachers (HALT) in October 2007. The same will be done at the Association of Asian Studies Conference in March 2008. The announcement will also be printed in the UH Center for Southeast Asian Studies and Philippine Studies Newsbulletin, the AAS Newsletter, the Council of Teachers of SEA Languages Newsletter, the SEALS Teachers list serve and the Consortium for the Advancement of Filipino Newsletter. Both directors of the Center for Philippine Studies and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies are cognizant of this project.

The preliminary announcements, processing of applications, visa preparations, and the like will be handled by Dr. Ramos.

Dr. Fortunato will select the teachers for the program. She is familiar with the language teaching staff, having been chair of the Filipino Department at DLSU-Manila. Dr. Fortunato has also worked with a number of local language programs in the Philippines. She will recruit and interview the program’s instructional faculty in the Philippines. The Project Directors are familiar with the De La Salle University language faculty and teachers of language at other Philippine institutions. Dr. Fortunato will oversee the recruitment advertisements to be sure they are so located that they will reach qualified minorities, women, the elderly, and handicapped candidates as well as other qualified persons. Her resume is in Appendix 1-C.

Dr. Mabanglo, AFAP Project Director, is the Coordinator of the Filipino and Philippine Literature Program of the Department of Indo-Pacific Languages at the University of Hawai`i. Her expertise in Filipino is well known. She has won the Palanca Awards in the Philippines several times, the highest award for literary accomplishment. She is working on a U.S. Department of Education funded project using technology to teach advanced Filipino and a textbook to accompany the video lessons. She is a full Professor of Filipino at the University of Hawai`i. Her curriculum vitae is provided in Appendix 1-A. Dr. Ramos is an internationally known author for her books on teaching Tagalog (Filipino). Her expertise is in teaching Filipino. She was the Director of AFAP from 1991-2007 (16 years). See Appendix 1-B for her resume. The only additional cost of this additional position to the project is the addition of another plane fare. The per diem will be split between Drs. Mabanglo and Ramos. With the assistance of Dr. Ramos, Dr. Mabanglo will plan the curriculum, oversee the training of the instructional faculty, and the structure of the classes, and monitor both proficiency and regularly scheduled testing. In short, Dr. Fortunato with Dr. Mabanglo’s approval will have control of the academic aspects of the program, leaving only logistical arrangements to Dr. Torreliza. Dr. Torreliza will communicate regularly with her staff concerning logistical arrangements and coordination of the program there. Her resume is in Appendix 1-D. The University of Hawai`i will administer the federal funds granted for this program through its Office of Research Services.
1.3 Testing and selection of participants

The pedagogic efforts of this program are in full compliance with the federal regulations encouraging proficiency in foreign language teaching. The Directors have not only undergone the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) training; Dr. Ramos especially has developed tests for Filipino in compliance with ACTFL recommendations. In 1983, with funds from a Title VI grant, Dr. Ramos developed a proficiency test, “Tagalog Proficiency Test,” accompanied by a manual and picture cues. She has piloted her test in University of Hawai`i classes. In the 1989 Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute (SEASSI), where she held the position of Director of the Language Program, Dr. Ramos developed tests for five Southeast Asian languages with her associate, Dr. J. D. Brown. Dr Brown has considerable expertise in the field of testing, having developed and refined tests, which currently serve as models for other languages whose proficiency testing procedure are still being developed. The SEASSI Proficiency Examination is given to the participants before and after the program.

All participants to the 2008 UH-DLSU Filipino Program will be required to take a simulated oral proficiency test that will be administered by phone. Dr. Ramos discussed the matter of presentation of test materials in detail with her colleague, Dr. James Collins, a past director of the Advanced Indonesian Abroad Program which was administered in Hawai`i for several years. He advised her of the difficulty of controlling the test materials, especially audiotapes, once they leave the UH campus. Thus after consideration of several methods of testing applicants, Dr. Ramos, in consultation with Dr. Mabanglo, selected conference telephone conversations as the best method. Dr. Mabanglo will implement ACTFL oral proficiency testing procedures in these tests, accepting only applicants who demonstrate proficiency beyond intermediate level. The test will be composed of a three-way conversation in a simulated situation requiring the applicant to make intelligent responses and demonstrate his or her fluency at the language level desired. Dr. Ramos and Dr. Mabanglo will conduct the telephone interview.

All applicants who meet the minimal expectation of an ACTFL rank of post-intermediate will be considered viable candidates for the program. After each oral telephone interview Dr. Ramos and Dr. Mabanglo will evaluate the applicant’s fluency and language ability and rate him or her for acceptance into the program. Only those students exhibiting intermediate or above proficiency in spoken Filipino will be accepted into the program.


1.3a Criteria for selection of participants

All students who meet the minimal expectation of an ACTFL rank of low-intermediate will be considered candidates for the program. Their test results, as well as other information about their academic status and career plans, will be evaluated by a committee of Tagalog/Filipino professors who are members of the national organization, the Consortium for the Advancement of Filipino. This committee will determine admission to the program. A pool of approximately thirty likely candidates for the project is expected.

An assurance of the University of Hawai`i’s compliance with civil rights policies, guidelines, and requirements is on file with the Department of Education. The associate project director will advertise the program throughout the United States and make every effort to attract minorities, women, the elderly, and the handicapped. The project director herself is a minority woman and is sensitive to the United States Department of Education’s effort to assist persons in these categories. Since it is assumed that all of the teachers in the program will be Filipinos, it goes without saying that hiring procedures will pay close attention to minority applicants.
1.4 On-site preparation and orientation

Prior to 2002 Advanced Filipino Abroad Program, Dr. Ramos visited DLSU and found its facilities more than adequate for the program. During this period, Dr. Ramos checked the adequacy of DLSU facilities for housing, board, living arrangements, and office and classroom facilities. She found the dormitories comfortable and the food service appropriate. Unlike previous programs, following the participants’ recommendations, the 2008 program will have participants stay entirely in a rural area (Dasmariñas) for eight weeks. DLSU-Dasmariñas is located in the midst of a Filipino-speaking community and it will not be difficult to find families who live in close proximity to the campus to host the students for eight weeks. Dr. Mabanglo was well satisfied with the DLSU classrooms and office facilities that were offered for the program. See Letter of Invitation from DLSU Academic Chancellor in Appendix 2-A, Letters from Host Institution. Staff orientation and training will take place during the five days prior to the beginning of classes. During that time the project directors will discuss with the staff such topics as learning strategies, grammar, and advanced supplementary materials in addition to rigorous teaching for proficiency and testing techniques, which will occupy the time allotted. Since teaching is content based, part of the training will be selection and development of materials on political science, history, religion, art and literature as well as other relevant topics.


1.5 Teacher training

The faculty will undergo intensive teacher training during the week before language classes start. The focus of the training will be on teaching for proficiency and communicative competence. Hands-on activities will include teaching receptive skills (listening, reading); teaching the productive skills (speaking, writing); classroom test construction and grading; materials development; and lesson planning. Procedures for selecting and teaching authentic materials, especially reading for academic purposes will be discussed and samples prepared. The techniques of class management will also be discussed.

Before the actual commencement of classes the language coordinator and an invited multicultural expert will discuss cross-cultural sensitivities with the participants, explaining the local customs and generally advising the students how best to foster positive relationships with their host families and the local citizenry and avoid unintentional discourtesy and anxiety.

During the student orientation period, the project director will administer proficiency examinations to the students. This will assist the staff, as well as the language coordinator, in helping each student to focus on his or her language goals for the summer. A reading, listening, dictation and cloze test (the SEASSI Proficiency Test) will also be administered with the same goals in mind.


1.6 In-country administration

Dr. Torreliza will coordinate the program at DLSU in consultation with Dr. Mabanglo. Dr. Fortunato, in consultation with Dr. Mabanglo, will oversee all aspects of the language program and will play a significant role in the selection and training of the teachers, and the invitation of guest lecturers. Most of the lecturers will come from the Manila academic community with which both Dr. Fortunato and Dr. Mabanglo are familiar. Dr. Torreliza will secure clerical workers and any other non-language instructional personnel necessary for the smooth operation of the program and will also interview and select the families who will house the students for their eight-week home stay. She will also administer the planning and logistics of the weekly field trips.


1.7 Program of study

The program will consist of two days of orientation, testing, and a placement session; eight weeks of intensive language and cultural study; two days of entrance/placement and exit/testing; eight weeks of home stay; and four days of touring Cavite and the surrounding areas.

The number of students will be limited to 15-17. Student selection will focus on intermediate level to post-intermediate level students (S2 to S3 in speaking proficiency).

The staff will consist of two American project directors, professors of Filipino at the University of Hawai`i, in-country language administration and coordinator, and three instructors. The administrator, language coordinator and the instructors will be hired in the Philippines.

Both directors, alternately, will administer the program, approve the teacher-training program, observe classes, conduct the exams, and supervise curriculum development.

Dr. Mabanglo with the assistance of a consultant will conduct the training and supervision of the teachers. She will direct the development of instructional materials and assist the teachers in the production of supplementary teaching aids.

The planned program of study for one day consists of four morning hours of classroom work, an afternoon hour of consultation with the teachers, if needed, and the rest of the afternoon hours devoted to task-based practical language use in the community such as meeting with non-governmental organizations (NGO), DLSU students, government officials, etc. A one-hour discussion of the results of the tasks assigned will be scheduled for the next day. This schedule will be in place five days a week during the eight-week program. The typical day will begin with two hours of communicative exercises conducted by teachers under the supervision of the language coordinator. In some cases, review drills or remedial modules may be necessary because of the diversity of the participants’ language backgrounds. The following two hours will include grammar contact sessions with discussions administered by the project directors or language coordinator, plus a discussion section based on listening exercises and/or pre-assigned readings from current periodicals or literature. There will also be seven university-level lectures in Filipino, one each week with exception of the final week. These will cover a variety of subjects and fields and will be delivered entirely in Filipino by relevant faculty members from the DLSU campus or from other educational institutions. Background readings will be assigned for these lectures. The students will be given reading assignments from the press, periodicals, or literature. As the students will be made to provide readings that appeal to their myriad interests, students will be assigned readings that will be discussed in class under the leadership of a faculty member. The discussion leader will also point out language problems that might arise in the course of the discussion. He or she will be prepared to provide on-the-spot exercises or use materials that are already available to help the students overcome these problems. The communicative sessions will present an integrated program designed to improve the students’ control of grammatical and social patterns in Filipino and in the use of formal and colloquial speaking styles. Afternoon or evening screenings of videotaped films, television programs or movies will occasionally supplement class time. When they are utilized, communicative exercises will be based on these videotapes the following day and writing assignments will be based on the films the class viewed. Methods might include discussion, dramatization, or use of newly learned idioms and phrases.

Students will be obliged to participate in seven selected field trips. They will be cultural field trips relevant to the topic taken up for the week and organized by the in-country administrator. Other obligatory extracurricular activities will involve attending local ceremonies such as baptisms, weddings, funerals, and local fiestas. Since a great number of extracurricular activities are available on campus and in the town, most of which are open to student participation and most of which will prove useful for language learning, the participants in this program will be encouraged to take advantage of these opportunities. This program is exceptionally intensive with classes and language related activities scheduled throughout the day, in the evenings and on weekends. Because of this degree of intensity, the faculty and staff involved in the program planning opted to have the program run for eight weeks, rather than seven.


1.8 Curriculum topics and activities

Week 1: Local life in Cavite (June 16-20, 2008)

Cultural Orientation (Speaker)

Campus Tour

Field Trip (Saturday, June 21): Cavite immersion – working in the fields; attending town fiesta; visit other Cavite towns

Week 2: Education and History of the Filipino People

Speaker on Philippine history

Field Trip (Saturday, June 28): Visitation of Cavite schools and the Aguinaldo Shrine

Week 3: Politics and Government

Speaker on Philippine politics and government

Field Trip (July 5): Visitation of Philippine Assembly in Quezon City and a municipal government

Week 4: Literature and Performing Arts

Speaker (a Philippine writer)

Field Trip (July 12): Visitation of Cultural Center of the Philippines


Watch a performance and visit various museums in Manila

See a Tagalog movie

Week 5: Economy and Globalization

Speaker (an economist or expert on globalization)

Field Trip (July 19): Island of Cebu – exposure to the effects of globalization

Week 6: Music and Visual Arts

Speakers on visual arts and music

Field Trip (July 26): Laguna and Angono, Rizal – visit the homes and exhibits of the Angono artists, and the crafts of Laguna

“Conspiracy Night” – visit the Conspiracy Club in Quezon City run by artists—exposure to Filipino poetry and music. Participants perform.

Week 7: Religion: Indigenous as well as popular religions

Speaker

Field Trip (August 2): Visitation of Catholic churches, Iglesia temples, Aglipay churches and Babaylan-run churches in Laguna


1.8a Student schedule: June 13-August 9, 2008

Weekdays Residence/Cultural Trips

June 13-14 Travel to De La Salle University--Dasmariñas, Cavite

June 14-August 9 Homestay with Dasmariñas parents

June 15 (Sunday) Dasmariñas Orientation

Week 1 June 16-20 Beginning of classes

June 16 (Monday) Proficiency testing and campus orientation

June 21 (Saturday) Cavite Immersion

Week 2 June 23-27

June 28 (Saturday) Cavite schools, shrine

Week 3 June 30-July 4

July 5 (Saturday) Philippine Assembly, Quezon City

Week 4 July 7-11

July 12 (Saturday) Cultural Center of the Philippines

Week 5 July 14-18

July 18 Mid-term & Proficiency Examinations

July 19-20 (Saturday-Sunday) Island of Cebu

Week 6 July 21-25

July 26 (Saturday) Tour of Angono, Rizal and Laguna

Visit Conspiracy Club, Quezon City

Week 7 July 28-August 1

August 2 (Saturday) Visitation of churches, temples, etc.

Week 8 August 4 (Monday) Achievement Test

August 5 (Tuesday) Proficiency Test

August 6 (Wednesday) Completion of projects

August 7 (Thursday) Closing program for Filipino families & friends

August 8 (Friday) Program evaluation/student feedback

August 9 (Saturday) Travel to US



Download 87.42 Kb.

Share with your friends:
  1   2   3




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2020
send message

    Main page