Aa history Lovers 2006 moderators Nancy Olson and Glenn F. Chesnut page



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occasionally written articles for the AA Grapevine, their service histories

and personal perspectives are in danger of getting lost for all time.

Chrm.'s Alexander, Estelle, Glynn, and McDowell are still alive but this

opportunity to preserve AA history languishes.


Yours in fellowship,

Rick T., Illinois


-----Original Message-----

From: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

[mailto:AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of ArtSheehan

Sent: Saturday, September 30, 2006 12:26 PM

Subject: RE: [AAHistoryLovers] List of Chairmen of the Board of Trustees?

...


Misc: (not board chairs but milestones for trustees)

11/41 to 05/44 - Margaret Farrand. First non-alcoholic woman trustee.

04/62 to 01/66 - Mary B. First alcoholic woman trustee.

...
.


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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++++Message 3753. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: Re: Multilith copies marked Loan

Copy


From: Mitchell K. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/3/2006 7:48:00 PM
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I too have examined several (at least 6 - 10) original

multiliths over the years and none have had loan copy,

review copy or any other such marking on them. I

reviewed copies at the NYC Archives with both Frank M

and Nell Wing, copies in Arizona, Ohio and one years

ago at an archives workshop. I know that Clarence's

copy never had such a stamp either. I do believe I saw

a copy at Stepping Stones on a few of my visits to see

Lois.
> --- In AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com,

> Shakey1aa@... wrote:

> >

> > With so many new AAHL's out there, I would like to



> know

> > if any have seen a multilith copy

> (pre-production) of

> > the book Alcoholics Anonymous stamped "loan copy."

>

> >


> > I have heard that they may exist but I have never

> seen


> > one.

> >


> > YIS,

> > Shakey Mike

> >

> >


> > [Non-text portions of this message have been

> removed]

> >

>

> I own Jim Burwell's copy of the Multilith edition



> (bought at auction

> from his niece in 2001). Interestingly, the title

> page has the hand-

> written notation: "#2 Copy / Dec. 8, 1938".

>

> There is not mention anywhere in this copy of it



> being a 'loan'

> copy - stamped or otherwise.

>

> I was also able to personnaly inspect the multilith



> copy sold at

> auction a few years ago - this one being the

> 'master' copy where all

> of the suggested corrections and edits to the Big

> Book were

> recorded. (NOTE: this copy was clearly NOT the

> 'printer's' copy

> since some of the suggestions listed there did not

> make it into the

> first edition, first printing of our Book. I

> remember, for instance,

> that the New Jersey psychiatrist had suggested that

> the last line of

> Dr. Bob's story - Your Heavenly Father will never

> let you down! - be

> amended to remove the "Heavenly Father" language.)

> This copy, being

> the 'master' office copy, did not have any 'loan'

> stamp either.

>

> I know that there are other copies surviving but



> these are the only

> two that I have actually seen. None of the other

> reports of

> multilith copies that I have read over the years, by

> people who have

> visited archives and private collection, mention a

> 'loan copy'

> stamp.


>

> Best,


>

> Old Bill

>

>

>



>

>

>



>

>

>



>
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++++Message 3754. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: Significant October Dates in

A.A. History

From: Mitchell K. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/4/2006 7:49:00 AM
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Just one correction...
October 5, 1941 - The dinner honoring Dr. Bob (not

Bill D.) was held at the Hotel Statler in Cleveland.

According to the press relears issued by the Cleveland

Central Committee, over 850 people from Cleveland and

about 16 out of town groups attended. The newspaper

had an article stating - "900 Reformed Alcoholics Hold

Anonymous Dinner. The list of people who spoke or were

introduced from the podium were: Mr. and Mrs. Borton

(non-alcoholic hosts of the Borton Group), Grace G.

(Abby's wife) Edna McD. (George McD.'s wife) Dorothy

Snyder, Anne Smith, Henrietta Seiberling, Wally G.

Bill D., Bill Wilson and Doc. Smith (Dr. Bob)


According the the Buletin to All Groups (the precursor

to the Central Bulletin), Cleveland AA didn't lose any

money on the dinner...they even made money.... a whole

90 cents.


> Oct 1936 - Bill C. a Canadian alkie staying at

> Bill's house,

> committed suicide using a gas stove.

> Oct 1939 - 1st central committee formed in

> Cleveland; 1st example

> A.A. rotation.

> Oct 1942 - 1st issue of Cleveland Central Bulletin

> is published.

> Oct 1944 - First non American branch started in

> Sydney, Australia by

> Father T V Dunlea and Rex.

> Oct 1951 - Lasker Award given to AA by American

> Public Health Assoc.

> Oct 1951 - Sister Ignatia wrote "Care of Alcoholics

> - St.Thomas

> Hospital and A.A. Started Movement Which Swept

> Country" article

> in "Hospital Progress" the journal of Catholic

> Hospital Association.

> Oct 1954 - The "Alcoholic Foundation" renamed the

> "General Service

> Board of A.A."

> Oct 1958 - Playhouse 90 TV airs "The Days of Wine

> and Roses".

> Oct 1, 1941 - Local news reports 1st AA Group in New

> Haven, CT.

> Oct 1, 1957 - Book "A.A. Comes of Age" published.

> Oct 2, 1944 - Marty M. founded National Committee

> Education

> Alcoholism, later became National Council on

> Alcoholism.

> Oct 3, 1945 - AA Grapevine adopted as national

> publication of AA.

> Oct 5-7, 1972 - 2nd World Service meeting held in

> New York.

> Oct 5, 1988 - Lois Burnam Wilson died.

> Oct 6, 1941 - 900 dine at Cleveland dinner for Bill

> D, AA #3.

> Oct 8, 1988 - Memorial Service for Lois W at

> Stepping Stones, NY.

> Oct. 9-11, 1969 - 1st World Service meeting held in

> New York with

> delegates from 14 countries.

> Oct 10, 1943 - 6 of 1st 9 AA's attend clubhouse

> anniv. in Toledo.

> Oct 10, 1970 - Lois reads "Bills Last Message" at

> annual dinner in

> NY.


> Oct 10, 1988 - Lois is buried next to Bill in

> Manchester, Vermont.

> Oct 13, 1947 - "The Melbourne Group" held its first

> meeting in

> Australia.

> Oct 14, 1939 - Journal of American Medical

> Association gives Big

> Book unfavorable review.

> Oct 15, 1904 - Marty M, early AA woman, is born in

> Chicago.

> Oct 17, 1935 - Ebby T, Bills sponsor, moves in with

> Bill and Lois.

> Oct 20, 1928 - Bill wrote promise to Lois in family

> Bible to quit

> drinking. By Thanksgiving added second promise.

> Oct 21, 1939 - Cleveland Plain Dealer begins series

> of articles on

> AA of by Elrick Davis.

> Oct 22, 1963 - E M Jellinek, alcoholism educator and

> AA friend dies.

> Oct 24, 1942 - L.A. Times reports AA groups in 14

> California cities.

> Oct 24, 1943 - Wilson's start 1st major A.A. tour,

> returned Jan 19,

> 1944.

> Oct 24, 1973 - Trustee's Archives Committee of AA



> has its 1st

> meeting.

> Oct 28, 1994 - National Council on Alcoholism and

> Drug Dependence

> celebrates 50 years.

>

>



>

>

>



>

>

>


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++++Message 3755. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: 12 and 12 Search Engine

From: William Middleton . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/3/2006 11:36:00 PM


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Jeff:

AAWS used to sell a disk with the "12and12" on it.

Part of the program was a "search engine."

It was not perfect because hyphenated words were missed it the search.

I don't have a current literature catalogue, so don't know if it is still

available.

LOVE in Service!

Bill Middleton


Jeff Clymer wrote:

HI,
Does anyone know of a 12 and 12 Search Engine?


Jc
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++++Message 3756. . . . . . . . . . . . Part 1 PIONEERS OF A.A. (pg 169) -

"thirty years" ?

From: davidgiven . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/4/2006 8:48:00 AM
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I was unable to find this in the archives of this group.
I was recently told that in earlier editions of the big book

the line "Today, hundreds of additional A.A. members

can be found who have had no relapse for more than thirty

years" reads 'fifty years' in some earlier editions. Can someone

help me verify this?
Thanks, David S
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++++Message 3757. . . . . . . . . . . . Tradition 11: how about television

and the internet?

From: Wendy . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/4/2006 8:09:00 AM
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Has there ever been any attempt to change Tradition 11

to include television, the internet, or the like?


Thanks in Advance,
Wendy
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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++++Message 3758. . . . . . . . . . . . The Texas Pamphlet 1940 (Part 1a)

From: Jim M . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/29/2006 7:22:00 PM


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The Texas Pamphlet: originally written by Larry J. in

Houston, Texas, in the form of six articles about

AA published in the Houston Press newspaper in late

January and early February 1940. In April 1940,

these six newspaper articles were published as AA's

first pamphlet. For further background information,

see AAHistoryLovers Message #3741.

____________________________________


Hi Cheryl,
The following is a series of six articles from

The Houston Press -- by Larry J. -- April 1940

(the others will follow in seperate posts).
Ever Grateful,

Jim M,


silkworth.net
THE FIRST "A.A." PAMPHLET

As Derived from The Series of Six Articles from "The Houston

Press"

by -Larry J.* -April 1940


*Larry J. came to Houston from Cleveland with only a Big Book and a

Spiritual Experience resulting from having taken the Steps while

hospitalized. His Sponsors were Dr. Bob and Clarence S. He had not

attended an A.A. meeting before coming to Houston.

____________________________________
THE TEXAS PAMPHLET (1940)
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS is an informal society of ex-alcoholics who aim to

help fellow problem drinkers recover their health.


Rapidly growing, now numbering about 8000, our Fellowship is

spreading throughout the country. The first member recovered seven years

ago. Strong chapters, over one hundred alcoholic men and women each, are

to be found in Cleveland, Ohio--Akron, Ohio--New York City. Vigorous

beginnings have been made in Los Angeles. Baltimore, Milwaukee, Kansas

City, Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, Washington D. C., St. Louis, and

Houston, Texas.
We of A.A. believe that two-thirds of our number have already laid

the foundation for permanent recovery. More than half of us have had no

relapse at all despite the fact we have often been pronounced incurable.
This approach to alcoholism is squarely based on our own drinking

experience, what we have learned from medicine and psychiatry, and upon

certain spiritual principles common to all creeds. We think each

man's religious views, if he has any, are his own affair. No member

is obliged to conform to anything whatever except to admit that he has

the alcoholic illness and that he honestly wishes to be rid of it.


While every shade of opinion is expressed among us we take no

position as a group, upon controversial questions. We are only trying to

aid the sick men and distracted families who want to be at peace. We

have found that genuine tolerance of others, coupled with a friendly

desire to be of service is most essential to our recovery. There are no

dues or fees; our alcoholic work is an avocation.


The Alcoholic Foundation of New York is our national headquarters.

Your inquiries will be answered if addressed to Post Office Box 658,

Church Street Annex, New York City.
The Fellowship publishes a book called "Alcoholics Anonymous"

setting forth our experience and methods at length. An excellent review

of the volume by Dr. Harry Emerson Fosdick appears on page 27 of this

booklet. Directions for obtaining the book and a detailed description of

the Alcoholic Foundation will also be found there.
On page 32 physicians will find an excellent medical paper describing

our approach. This paper appeared last year in The Journal Lancet

(Minneapolis) and was written by Dr. W. D. Silkworth, Chief Physician at

the Charles B. Towns Hospital, New York, where our work had its

inception five years ago.
We can no better present the spirit and purpose of Alcoholics

Anonymous than to invite reading of six articles which recently appeared

in The Houston Press. These pieces were written by one of our newer

members, a newspaperman who, scarcely two years ago, found himself in

that shadowy No Man's Land which lies just between Here and

Here-after. Due to grave alcoholism and pulmonary trouble, two

institutions had refused to admit him--too nearly dead, they thought.

Then he found the Cleveland A.A. Fellowship. Now he's on a Texas

newspaper!
Let Mr. Anonymous of Houston and his editor tell you about it----
AN EDITORIAL
(As published by the Houston Press)
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Age-old, but still alive, is the question as to when the drinking of

alcoholic beverages ceases to be a social lubricant, an aid to

conviviality, a solace to the weary and distressed, a tonic to the body

and spirit; and when it becomes a devourer of health, success and

happiness.
People of independent spirit like to settle the question for

themselves.


People inclined to reform their neighbors--and even many otherwise

reticent people, because they are honestly and generously concerned over

the welfare at least of those near to them--sometimes come to the front

with suggestions for the control of drinking, or even for its abolition.


But neither of these attitudes is the concern of Alcoholics

Anonymous, a group of several hundred ex-drinkers who have taken to the

wagon by a technique of their own, and who are riding there today after

most of them had been pronounced hopeless by friends, families,

employers, physicians, ministers, psychiatrists, hospitals and

sanitariums.


The call themselves true alcoholics--people in whom alcohol becomes a

disease for which medical and psychiatric science has not yet found a

specific cure.
They say their cure works. They show as witness hundreds of lives

restored to health and usefulness, hundreds more among their families

relieved of terror and despair, and restored to happiness through the

alcoholics' changed lives.


The Press thinks their problem and their unusual success with it is

so important that it begins today a series of six articles on Alcoholics

Anonymous, written by "One of Them," now living in Houston.
The series should provoke thought among the friends and families of

"alcoholics," among physicians and psychiatrists, ministers,

social workers, employers, men's and women's clubs--and

alcoholics.


The Press takes a liberal attitude on drinking. It stood for repeal

of prohibition. But even the liquor industry, we believe, would wish

success to a technique that promises much to the men and women who

cannot handle their drinks.


Inquiry and comment are invited.
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++++Message 3759. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: Significant October Dates in

A.A. History

From: LES COLE . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/4/2006 12:23:00 PM
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Hi: Another correction to this.... Lois is buried along with Bill in EAST

DORSET, Vermont (Not Manchester ...Oct 10th listing).

Les Cole "an old Vermonter"
----- Original Message -----

From: Mitchell K.

Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2006 5:49 AM

Subject: Re: [AAHistoryLovers] Significant October Dates in A.A. History


Just one correction...
October 5, 1941 - The dinner honoring Dr. Bob (not

Bill D.) was held at the Hotel Statler in Cleveland.

According to the press relears issued by the Cleveland

Central Committee, over 850 people from Cleveland and

about 16 out of town groups attended. The newspaper

had an article stating - "900 Reformed Alcoholics Hold

Anonymous Dinner. The list of people who spoke or were

introduced from the podium were: Mr. and Mrs. Borton

(non-alcoholic hosts of the Borton Group), Grace G.

(Abby's wife) Edna McD. (George McD.'s wife) Dorothy

Snyder, Anne Smith, Henrietta Seiberling, Wally G.

Bill D., Bill Wilson and Doc. Smith (Dr. Bob)


According the the Buletin to All Groups (the precursor

to the Central Bulletin), Cleveland AA didn't lose any

money on the dinner...they even made money.... a whole

90 cents.


> Oct 1936 - Bill C. a Canadian alkie staying at

> Bill's house,

> committed suicide using a gas stove.

> Oct 1939 - 1st central committee formed in

> Cleveland; 1st example

> A.A. rotation.

> Oct 1942 - 1st issue of Cleveland Central Bulletin

> is published.

> Oct 1944 - First non American branch started in

> Sydney, Australia by

> Father T V Dunlea and Rex.

> Oct 1951 - Lasker Award given to AA by American

> Public Health Assoc.

> Oct 1951 - Sister Ignatia wrote "Care of Alcoholics

> - St.Thomas

> Hospital and A.A. Started Movement Which Swept

> Country" article

> in "Hospital Progress" the journal of Catholic

> Hospital Association.

> Oct 1954 - The "Alcoholic Foundation" renamed the

> "General Service

> Board of A.A."

> Oct 1958 - Playhouse 90 TV airs "The Days of Wine

> and Roses".

> Oct 1, 1941 - Local news reports 1st AA Group in New

> Haven, CT.

> Oct 1, 1957 - Book "A.A. Comes of Age" published.

> Oct 2, 1944 - Marty M. founded National Committee

> Education

> Alcoholism, later became National Council on

> Alcoholism.

> Oct 3, 1945 - AA Grapevine adopted as national

> publication of AA.

> Oct 5-7, 1972 - 2nd World Service meeting held in

> New York.

> Oct 5, 1988 - Lois Burnam Wilson died.

> Oct 6, 1941 - 900 dine at Cleveland dinner for Bill

> D, AA #3.

> Oct 8, 1988 - Memorial Service for Lois W at

> Stepping Stones, NY.

> Oct. 9-11, 1969 - 1st World Service meeting held in

> New York with

> delegates from 14 countries.

> Oct 10, 1943 - 6 of 1st 9 AA's attend clubhouse

> anniv. in Toledo.

> Oct 10, 1970 - Lois reads "Bills Last Message" at

> annual dinner in

> NY.


> Oct 10, 1988 - Lois is buried next to Bill in

> Manchester, Vermont.

> Oct 13, 1947 - "The Melbourne Group" held its first

> meeting in

> Australia.

> Oct 14, 1939 - Journal of American Medical

> Association gives Big

> Book unfavorable review.

> Oct 15, 1904 - Marty M, early AA woman, is born in

> Chicago.

> Oct 17, 1935 - Ebby T, Bills sponsor, moves in with

> Bill and Lois.

> Oct 20, 1928 - Bill wrote promise to Lois in family

> Bible to quit

> drinking. By Thanksgiving added second promise.

> Oct 21, 1939 - Cleveland Plain Dealer begins series

> of articles on

> AA of by Elrick Davis.

> Oct 22, 1963 - E M Jellinek, alcoholism educator and

> AA friend dies.

> Oct 24, 1942 - L.A. Times reports AA groups in 14

> California cities.

> Oct 24, 1943 - Wilson's start 1st major A.A. tour,

> returned Jan 19,

> 1944.

> Oct 24, 1973 - Trustee's Archives Committee of AA



> has its 1st

> meeting.

> Oct 28, 1994 - National Council on Alcoholism and

> Drug Dependence

> celebrates 50 years.

>

>



>

>

>



>

>

>


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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++++Message 3760. . . . . . . . . . . . Texas Preamble

From: timderan . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/28/2006 1:27:00 AM


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"Does anyone know what this prayer says or where

I can find a copy?"


Go to:
http://a-1associates.com/aa/texas_preamble.htm
It has some other links at the bottom
tmd
__________________________________________________
http://a-1associates.com/aa/texas_preamble.htm
Texas Preamble
A few months after the Grapevine published the Preamble in June, 1947, Ollie

L.,


Dick F., and Searcy W. decided to beef it up for the drunks in Texas.

"We worked

on it, passed it around, and agreed on this version, " says Searcy W.

"It's now

read by groups throughout the state." It works for Searcy. He's been

sober 54


years. - February, 2001 Grapevine
For all who would be interested in it:
Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their

experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their

common

problem and help others to recover from alcoholism.


We are gathered here because we are faced with the fact that we are

powerless

over alcohol, and are unable to do anything about it without the help of a

Power


greater than ourselves.
We feel each person's religious convictions, if any, are his own affair, and

the


simple purpose of the program of AA is to show what may be done to enlist

the


aid of a Power greater than ourselves, regardless of what our individual

conception of that Power may be.


In order to form a habit of depending upon and referring all we do to that

Power, we must first apply ourselves with some diligence, but repetition

confirms and strengthens this habit, then faith comes naturally.
We have all come to know that as alcoholics we are suffering from a serious

disease for which medicine has no cure. Our condition may be the result of

an

allergic reaction to alcohol which makes it impossible for us to drink in



moderation. This condition has never, by any treatment with which we are

familiar, been permanently cured. The only relief we have to offer is

absolute

abstinence - a second meaning of AA.


There are no dues or fees. The only requirement is an honest desire to stop

drinking. Each member is a person with an acknowledged alcoholic problem who

has

found the key to abstinence from day to day by adhering to the program of



Alcoholics Anonymous. The moment he resumes drinking he loses all status as

a

member of AA. His reinstatement is automatic, however, when he again



fulfills

the sole requirement for membership - an honest desire to quit drinking.


Not being reformers we offer our experience only to those who want it.
AA is not interested in sobering up drunks who are seeking only temporary

sobriety. We have a way out on which we can absolutely agree and in which we

join in harmonious action. Rarely have we seen a person fail who has

thoroughly

followed our path. Those who do not recover are those who will not or cannot

lend themselves to this simple program--usually men and women who are

incapable

of being honest with themselves. You may like this Program or you many not,

but

the fact remains that is works.. and we believe it is our only chance to



recover.
There is a vast amount of fun included in the AA fellowship. Some people may

be

shocked at our apparent worldliness and levity, but just underneath there is



a

deadly earnestness and a full realization that we must put first things

firs.

With each of us the first thing is our alcoholic problem. Faith must work



twenty-four hours a day in and through us, or we perish.
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++++Message 3761. . . . . . . . . . . . The Texas Pamphlet 1940 (Part 1b)

From: Jim M . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/29/2006 7:24:00 PM


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STORY OF A "WAY OUT" FOR HOPELESS DRINKERS
How an Idea Originated by Ex-Alcoholics Has Helped 2000 to Recover
This is a series of six articles about a group of ex-drinkers who have

succeeded in a new method of going on the wagon and staying there. One

of their first principles is to pass their experience along, to help

others similarly afflicted. The Press will be glad to receive comments.

-- The Editor
By a Member of Alcoholics Anonymous
People who get around much need no telling that the problem of those

who drink too much for the good of themselves, their work and their

families is already serious and becoming worse.
And those who know most about it, either because they themselves are

drinkers of this type or because they are close to one who is, realize

it in all its lacerating, hopeless details.
It is an age-old problem. Prohibition undoubtedly intensified it. The

depression has multiplied its victims.


Today many people are taking the attitude of the English officer in

India, who hated his assignment. When reproved for excessive drinking,

he lifted his glass and said, "This is the swiftest road out of

India."
Now it is true that this part of Texas has escaped the worst part of

the depression; but not all of it. And trouble is always easy to find,

so that many, like the Englishman, have been indulging in excessive

elbow-bending to get away from their worries, their disappointments and

their fears in the unstable, war-crazy unsure world of today.


Free to begin drinking, some of them find they are not free to stop.
This series of articles is about them, for them, and for those who

are willing to help them.


It is the story of how hundreds of ex-alcoholics, by a method which

they themselves devised and perfected, have found the way out of the

squirrel cage.
Most of them, after all that medical and psychiatric science, and

even formal religion, could do, had been pronounced hopeless.


But if you think they are out to take the glass from the hand of

drinkers to whom the diagnosis "alcoholic" does not apply, you

are wholly mistaken. As one of them put it, "If anyone who is

showing inability to control his drinking can do the right about face

and drink like a gentleman, our hats are off to him. Heaven knows, we

have tried long enough and hard enough to drink like other people."


Thus the problem, as Alcoholics Anonymous sees it, is limited

strictly to those who have become, or are on the road to becoming,

drinkers headed straight for destruction, unless help beyond the usual

is brought within their reach.


If this series sometimes turns autobiographical, it will be because

it is difficult for a man who has been delivered of a ghastly fate to

write with the soberness and restraint required by a strictly objective

account.
Tried Many Cures


Jails, hospitals, attempts at suicide, psychopathic wards,

sanitariums, all sorts of "spiritual" and "faith" cures,

even hypnotism---these have all been mine without deliverance; some by

choice, some because society's hand was raised against me.


Society did not know I was sick. I had made my bed and society

insisted that I lie in it. But alcoholics are definitely sick, as this

series will try to show.
Nor did tears, pleadings or threats alter my course for long; and in

spite of my own utmost determination, I could never find the answer.


I have personally met at least one hundred "cured"

alcoholics---"fellow rummies" as they jokingly call each other.


Their stories parallel my own. Most of them are even worse. One man

had been in a sanitarium more than one hundred times.


Another came to see me while I was "taking a rest" in a

sanitarium---being defogged so I could use again what brains I had. A

livid scar around his neck stood out like the welt raised by a whip. His

wrists bore similar witness to the realization of the utter helplessness

that had driven him to try suicide as his "swiftest road" out of

the India of his perplexities.


I have been in the homes of some ex-alcoholics, Skeptical by nature,

an investigator by training, I took no one's unsupported word. But I

saw for myself, not only the new bearing of confidence, even of joy,

that exuded from the ex-drinker, but also the ordered life of his family

and the new hope and happiness in their faces. I heard it in the tone of

their voices.


Literally, these things are hard to believe unless you have had both

the experience of being damned and then the surprise of being rescued

out of "the jaws of hell," as the old-fashioned revivalists used

to put it.


No Mystery
Some of the experiences of these "cured" alcoholics will

enliven the serious business of these articles, which is to explain how

the alcoholic gets that way; why he or she is different from other

drinkers who are able to "hold their liquor" all their lives;

how the fellowship called Alcoholics Anonymous came into being and

spread from one man, who in desperation evolved the idea, to include now

nearly five hundred men and women, with centers being established in one

section of the country after another; in as much detail as space will

permit, just what the technique is, how it works, how the alcoholic may

avail himself of it; and how anyone interested may help.


Repeating what the advance notice of the series said: "No

medicine. No treatments. No cost. No mystery. No terrible battle of the

will. Ministers have preached about it. Physicians and psychiatrists

have praised it."


No one has an axe to grind. Members of the fellowship give of their

time---often their money---to help some victim. Why? The series will

also explain that.
An Inevitable End
One can get an eye-witness picture of what happens when several score

ex-alcoholics get together in a meeting. No more startling, unbelievable

contrast could be imagined than a comparison with what they would have

looked like had they assembled when each was at the end of his rope.


Physicians, perhaps more than any other group, know the alcoholic and

his hitherto almost inevitable end. Here are the words of two of them:


"I personally know 30 of these cases who were the type with whom

other methods had failed completely.


"Because of the possibilities of rapid growth inherent in this

group, they may mark a new epoch in the annals of alcoholism. These men

may well have a remedy for thousands of such situations.
"You may rely absolutely on anything they say about themselves.
"The subject seems to me to be of paramount importance to those

afflicted with alcoholic addiction. I say this after many years

experience as medical director of one of the oldest hospitals in the

country treating alcoholic and drug addiction."


The second says:
"Will the movement spread? Will these recoveries be permanent? No

one can say. Yet we at this hospital, from our observation of many

cases, are willing to record our present opinion as a strong

`yes' to both questions."


The head of a hospital and sanitarium in a nearby Texas city, who has

many alcoholics come to him, now requires all of them to read about the

methods of "Alcoholics Anonymous."
There must be fire where there is smoke.
I, for one, know this to be true.
(Taken from http://silkworth.net/aahistory/houston_press1940a.html )
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++++Message 3762. . . . . . . . . . . . The Texas Pamphlet 1940 (Part 2)

From: Jim M . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/29/2006 7:25:00 PM


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SEEMINGLY ALLERGIC TO DRINK:

ALCOHOLIC'S BURDEN


Craving, Plus Inability to Heed Warning of Own Weakness, Leads Inebriate

to Succumb

(Second of Six Articles)

____________________________________


What is an "alcoholic"? How does he differ from other drinkers?

An incident to illustrate:


Convinced that I had nothing to sell, puzzled that I did not come as

a patient either, the nurse finally ushered me into the office of one of

Houston's most eminent physicians. He is prominent also in other

activities that often have put him in the spotlight. He is a "big

name."
I had come, as an ex-alcoholic, to tell him about Alcoholics

Anonymous and to have him introduce me to an alcoholic victim among his

patients whom I might help; for I am a stranger in Houston.
One Needing Help
The good doctor, eyebrows bristling, welcomed me with gruff

suspicion. No, he had never heard of Alcoholics Anonymous. But he

listened. I felt he was showing more Texas courtesy than interest.
Half way through my recital he broke in: "Humph," he humphed,

"I have no patience with these fellows you call `victims.'"

His voice showed it. "Why, I can handle anything. So could they

control their drinking if they wanted to."


But he gave me the name of an able man whose excessive indulgence in

firewater was endangering the business he had built up, wrecking his

health, rendering his family desperate.
"He's just out of a cure," said the doctor. "But he

gave them the runaround some way. Hitting it up again. See what you can

do with him. Tell him I sent you. His family is crazy. I can do nothing

more."
There you have in one situation the two kinds of drinkers--the man

who can "handle anything," and the drinker who steps right out

of one of the usual "cures" and hoists a few before he even gets

home.
But our experience tells us that everybody cannot "handle

anything." The alcoholic cannot control his drinking. Sometimes the

dividing line over which he has slid is hard to place.
Some people are alcoholics with their first drink. Most of them

become such by degrees.


"Not an Alcoholic"
How can a drinker define his position on the scale? How can the

condition known medically as alcoholism be recognized before the

desperate stage?
To get drunk once in a while does not necessarily prove one is an

alcoholic in the sense in which the word is used here. A man may drink

steadily all his life with an occasional roaring bender, and not be thus

classified.


Just before writing this article, I lunched by chance with a

newspaperman of short acquaintance. This subject came up and I showed

him a draft of yesterday's story in this series.
"Humm!" he said. "That hits me. I've been on the

wagon for nine months now. I've never heard of Alcoholics Anonymous;

but I know it isn't the tenth drink that will get me down, but the

first one. But I'm not an alcoholic."


That's what they all say.
Nobody likes to admit that he is bodily and mentally different from

his fellows, especially if he imagines (though wrongly) that doing so

pegs him as somehow inferior in good taste, self-control,

gentlemanliness, or what have you.


"O.K., then," I said. "You're not an alcoholic.

However, here's a test I'll bet you're afraid to make.


"You can diagnose yourself, I'll get a bottle. Come to my

room this evening and we'll sit around and gas, while you try some

controlled drinking. Take several shots and see what happens.
The First Drink
"See if you can stop abruptly and forget about it. Try it several

times. It will not take long to decide if you are honest with yourself,

and it may be worth a bad case of jitters to learn the truth."
"Nothing doing," the gentleman of the press replied. He came

back with it so quickly that you couldn't doubt he meant it.

"Done that too many times already. It's the first drink that

sends me `off to the races.'"


He's an alcoholic. Perhaps not for a long time will he touch

another drop. Then some fine day when he isn't looking, one of the

insanely absurd and inadequate reasons with which the alcoholic deludes

himself when he wants a drink, will pop into his head, just when the

drinks are handy.
The first glass down, it's the old story again; but this time

he's older. The reasons for his former sobriety may be gone. The

picture is different. He has shamed himself, damaged his pride and

self-confidence. And perhaps he can't snap out of it by himself or

with the ordinary kind of help.
With true alcoholics, it is never a question of control or

moderation. Their only out is absolute abstinence.


Alcoholics Anonymous might well make the last two words of the

preceding paragraph the second meaning of "A.A."


Why is this total aversion necessary for the drinkers and not for

others?
Omar Khayyam, you remember, said of the juice of his well beloved

grape: "'Tis a blessing; we should use it, should we not? And if a

curse, why then, who put it there?"


The alcoholic can indulge in no such philosophical fancies, any more

than a diabetic can gorge himself on sweets


His body and his mind become sick, with alcohol.
It is as though he is allergic to drink. The allergy theory is

admitted by physicians who advance it to be only a theory. Nevertheless,

it explains many things that otherwise do not make sense.
Three things especially characterize the alcoholic as a different

breed of cattle.


The first is the phenomenon of craving. Not merely the thought that a

drink would be agreeable, but a definite, undeniable craving.


The second is the appearance of the curious mental phenomenon that,

parallel to the victim's sound reasoning which warns him of the

folly and danger, there inevitably runs some insanely trivial excuse for

taking the first drink. Insanely trivial because, measured against the

hell which from experience he knows he's in for, no one in the state

of mind called normal and sane would act on it for a minute.


Sound reasoning fails to hold him in check. The insane idea wins out.
Unable to Stop
The third distinguishing characteristic is the fact that the

alcoholic, actual or potential, is absolutely unable to stop drinking on

the basis of self-knowledge.
This point has been smashed home on many members of Alcoholics

Anonymous out of bitter experience.


How many are the dodges they have tried in vain! Here is a partial

list: Drinking whiskey only with milk, drinking beer only, limiting the

number of drinks, never drinking alone, drinking only at home, never

having it in the home, never drinking during business hours, drinking

only at parities, switching from Scotch to brandy or rum, drinking only

natural wines, agreeing to resign if ever drunk on the job, taking a

trip, swearing off forever (with and without a solemn oath), taking more

physical exercise, reading inspirational books, going to health farms

and sanitariums, accepting voluntary commitment to asylums--the list

could go on ad infinitum.


I can add a favorite of my own. Believing that the evil of drink lies

not in its use but in its abuse. I tried asking whatever you may choose

to call the higher Power to teach me control.
Well, it seems God didn't build me that way. I'm glad I found

out in time.


Alcoholism is an illness in a class by itself.
People feel sorry for the victim of cancer. No one gets angry about

it. But look at the alcoholic's trail of misunderstanding, fierce

resentments, financial insecurity, disgusted friends and employers,

warped lives of blameless and trusting children, sad wives and

parents--and more.
That is why Alcoholics Anonymous wants this message spread broadcast.

If you see no need for it now, who knows how soon you may have occasion

to remember it? It may not be a bad idea to clip this series and save it

against that day.


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++++Message 3763. . . . . . . . . . . . The Texas Pamphlet 1940 (Part 3)

From: Jim M . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/29/2006 7:26:00 PM


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HOW IT STARTED AND GAINED SPEED

Idea to Help Serious Alcoholics Originated In East;

Launched by Man Who Was "Incurable"

(Third of Six Articles)

____________________________________
"I see he's back again." said the orderly to the nurse as

Mr. X for the umpsteenth time turned up in the alcoholic division of a

hospital in a larger Eastern city.
He was a regular customer. But this time he came to grips with

himself on an idea brought by a friend. More ideas came later. He

examined and re-examined them. Already he had given himself up to the

fate of an incurable alcoholic, in he had nothing to turn to more

effective than he had found hitherto.
When hospital care had knocked the booze out of his brain and nerves,

he immediately began to put his ideas into practice. They worked. He

stayed sober.
"Later," said the head of the hospital, "he requested the

privilege of being allowed to tell his story to other patients here, and

with some misgiving we consented.
"The cases we have followed through have been most interesting;

in fact, many are amazing.


"The unselfishness of these men as we have come to know them, the

entire absence of profit motive, and their community spirit, is indeed

inspiring to one who has labored long and wearily in this alcoholic

field.
Five Years Old


Thus was Alcoholics Anonymous born about five years ago, out of one

victim's desperation. Growing very slowly at first, actually from

man to man, centers of information about it now are springing up in

widely scattered areas throughout the country.


In the doctor's comment you have the principle reason for the

idea's thus coming to nation-wide attention.


When a man makes a spectacular come-back--a right-about-face after

having made an ass of himself for years--people ask questions. They may

be skeptical at first, but secretly they are astonished, and curious.
Furthermore, the man thus set upon his feet cannot help being a kind

of missionary. But a missionary with what a difference! What missionary

to the savage was ever a savage? But the messenger of Alcoholics

Anonymous knows from his own checkered experience all the tricks, all

the curves in the road, all the answers to the alcoholic's self

delusions.


That's the thing that sold me, finally. These "rummies"

knew their onions. They weren't mealy mouthed. They didn't

lecture. When they talked to me, still unconvinced, their faces, their

"lingo," their gestures, their whole bearing, bespoke the

onetime experienced toper.
They were offering, not theory but fact. They acted as though they

had a sure thing. They merely wanted me to know about it, what it had

done for them.
Take It of Leave It
Go back now to four years ago. A man pacing the lobby of a hotel in a

strange city, He is a member of Alcoholics Anonymous.


Something has gone wrong with his business trip. Not only has he

failed, but he wonders how he is going to pay his hotel bill. The deal

that fell through has stirred up a bitter feeling in him.
He has only been sober a few months. As he feels the temptation of

the inviting bar at the end of the lobby, he realizes his predicament.


Should he join the gay crowd? Find release, scrape an acquaintance,

avoid a lonesome week-end?


Here he runs square up against one of the basic rules of the

fellowship. When tempted, it says, if possible work with another

alcoholic.
With music and gay chatter in his ears, he turns and seeks the lobby

church directory. At random he selects the name of a minister and

telephones him. His talk leads him to a former able and respected

resident who is on the rocks from excessive drinking.


How this man was reclaimed, how these two salvaged two others, how in

18 months the number grew to 10, and how one couple became so interested

that they dedicated their home to the work, is an absorbing story

related in the book, "Alcoholics Anonymous," published by the

fellowship.
Of this, more later; for the book, and the "Alcoholic

Foundation," have been other notable steps in making the message

available to all.
The only requirement for membership is the honest willingness to do

anything to quit drinking.


No Fees, No Dues
There are no fees, no dues. You need not buy the book if an alcoholic

cured by, and experienced in, the technique of Alcoholics Anonymous will

clearly give you an idea.
Buttressing the personal work of one alcoholic with another, informal

meetings are arranged in each center as soon as a small group can be

formed.
I never saw anything like them. Here centers the social life of the

group. Happiness, gaiety, good fellowship abound. After the brief

session devoted to the problems of alcoholics, and the words of advice

and encouragement and the interchange of experiences, there may be a

poker game, or several tables of bridge.
These birds don't turn sissy when they quit drinking. They get

back their real vitality. And the majority are clever, able, once

successful people. You see many business men, doctors, lawyers, star

salesmen, contractors, insurance men, brokers, merchants, as well as the

man whose field is more limited.
These gatherings present the vivid contrast of happy faces and the

strained, hungry faces of "prospects" hearing about this for the

first time.
The members take away with them a glow they never got out of the best

bottle they ever tipped. And it's there in the morning--a hangover

of relief, freedom, of strength to hit the new day's work and worry

right on the button.


The prospects take away at least the first thrill of wonder and of

hope. Is it strange that the group grows?


Ministers Approve
Ministers like Dr. Dilworth Lupton, widely known pastor of First

Unitarian Church in Cleveland, O., have personally investigated and then

devoted a whole sermon to the subject.
Newspapers like The Houston Press have offered space.
Physicians, nurses, psychiatrists, who have had personal experience

with alcoholics made well by this method, give it to other patients.


And alcoholics grab off prospects wherever they spy them, sometimes

right off the bar. Their telephones, when they ceased to be anonymous,

may ring at any hour of the night telling of someone in desperate

plight. They go. The movement spreads.


So far, in two weeks I have been in Houston, I have yet to find one

person who heard me talk even most casually about this, who hasn't

said, either, "Say, that sounds like something"; or, more often,

"I know a man who needs it bad. Here's his name."


Alcoholics Anonymous is the most infectious idea I ever caught. I am

quite likely to give it to anyone I come in contact with, for I take no

precautions.
My own experience well illustrates how the movement spreads.
Before I left Cleveland to come to Houston, for three weeks I had

been trying to straighten out a friend who was soused to the gills,

chiefly by drinking with him and trying to taper him off, and either

walking him home so he wouldn't break his neck, or pouring him into

a taxi.
He wound up in a liquor cure institution. I visited him. By that

time, Alcoholics Anonymous had got hold of him.


He told me about them. By accident or design--I never knew which--I

met two of them at his bedside one morning.


This friend took to this thing and went to town. It had me thinking,

because he had been in terrible shape. He wasn't far out of the port

of last call.
Problem of Control
It wasn't long afterwards when, "well in the bag," I

received a visit at my hotel from an Alcoholics Anonymous. I had never

even heard of him.
No soap. No dice. Like the good doctor mentioned at the beginning of

this article, I wasn't interested.


My problem was merely one of control. I wasn't an alcoholic (so I

thought). How did he get that way--telling me I was?


When the bottle in my room was empty, he suggested that we adjourn to

the bar. We did. He drank coffee, bought whisky for me.


Next morning all I could clearly remember was that this perfect

stranger spent time and money on me to get me to quit drinking, and I

didn't know why. Nothing like this had ever happened to me before.

So when he telephoned the next evening asking if he could come over, I

said, "Yes."
By the time he got there, I was even further "overseas" than

at the time of his first visit. He urged patiently that I should go to a

hospital, rest up, eat again like a human being, and think the thing

out.
The man had inhuman patience. He said he did this because he liked to

and because it helped him to stay sober. This was in a cafe.
"Nuts," I said.
But through a zero blizzard that night I finally let him drive me 50

miles to a sanitarium approved by Alcoholics Anonymous, and at 4 a. m.,

as he left me, after having talked with me for eight hours without once

doing the pleading act, he saw me take my last drink.


And I mean last.
For a week, sometimes as many as half a dozen members of Alcoholics

Anonymous visited me in the sanitarium every day. I regained my poise.

The fourth day I swallowed my pride and admitted that although I might

in all other things have equal omnipotence with God Himself, in regard

to drink I was licked before I started.
I began practicing the technique immediately. Then occurred the

change, to me still amazing.


Now then, when I decided to live in Houston, how could I help

spilling some of this stuff down here, where nobody seems to know about

it?
Wouldn't I be a heel if I kept such a priceless thing to myself?
Did you ever hear "Freely ye have received, freely give?"
(Taken from http://silkworth.net/aahistory/houston_press1940c.html )
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++++Message 3764. . . . . . . . . . . . History of "the Twelve Promises"

From: timderan . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/5/2006 1:07:00 AM


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I have another question.
Does anyone know the history of that section of

the Big Book on Pages 83 and 84 that so many call

the Promises?
tmd
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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++++Message 3765. . . . . . . . . . . . The Texas Pamphlet 1940 (Part 4)

From: Jim M . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/29/2006 7:30:00 PM


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SPIRITUAL ASPECT MOST IMPORTANT

Foundation for New Life Comes With Reliance Upon Power

Greater Than Human Ken

(Fourth of Six Articles)

____________________________________
As readers of these articles by now have doubtless suspected, the

core of the technique by which Alcoholics Anonymous has worked what

often seems like a miracle in the lives of men and women, is spiritual.
Not religious, but spiritual.
Not mental, not psychological---though it is all three of these

also---but spiritual.


The majority of the hundreds of alcoholics already reclaimed

probably could have been classed rightly only as unbelievers and

agnostics. Does it seem strange that this attitude proved no bar to

their laying hold on the central truth that is demonstrated by this

group?
No stranger than the fact that the membership embraces Jew and

Gentile, Catholic and Protestant, all creeds, denominations and faiths.


Universal Truth
There is no reason why Hindu, the Mohammedan, or the veriest

unreclaimed Hottentot could not translate the central truth about this

cure for alcoholism into his own faith, his own native customs.
It is universal because it depends on its effectiveness, and

depends absolutely on the recognition of a Power higher than man--the

Creative Spirit over all. The name is immaterial.
It will, however, simplify matters to use the familiar terminology

employed in the Christian religion, calling this power "God."


How you picture Him, say Alcoholics Anonymous in all reverence,

does not matter. To Smith He may be a patriarch up there somewhere, with

a dazzling robe. To Jones, the agnostic, His form is still a question

mark, if indeed He has any form understandable to man. And Brown may

almost literally feel the reassuring pressure of His hand as they walk

together through the tough spots of the day.


The Creative Spirit is in all things. It is not strange that

people should differ in the ways in which they realize this.


But the Power Itself is one and the same thing.
How did these ex-alcoholics get hold of this Power? By a simple

act of faith. It's really the way the Good Book tells about.


The alcoholic says in effect:
"I've beat this habit around the bush from hell to

breakfast and back again, and I can't whip it. It has me down. I

can't beat it alone. But there is a Power greater than I. I shall

call on it now; and forever more, daily, hourly if necessary, to

preserve me from this evil."
If this be said in absolute honesty, and adhered to, the

foundation of a new life is laid, this time on rock. No more shifting

sand.
Since "faith without works is dead," however, more has to

be done. This is only the beginning. And it is in the sequence of other

steps in the technique that the alcoholic soon realizes the unique and

amazing practical value.


Habit-Changing
The reward seems to go hand in hand with the deed.
Psychologists and psychiatrists will tell you that, to change a

person's ingrained habits, one of two things is necessary: either a

long and painful re-education of mind and body, by a supreme and often

agonizing effort of the will, so that one set of habits finally is

ousted and a new set learned by deliberate and diligent dally practice;

or else a change, such as a person experiences in a complete surrender

to spiritual principles.
This later is what is meant by a spiritual experience. It reaches

the inner man. The old passes away and behold all things are indeed

become new.
If it can be achieved, it is the simplest, the easiest, the

quickest, the surest way, and the safest from relapse.


William James, the noted psychologist, in his book "Varieties

of Religious Experiences," illustrates the myriad paths by which

this inner change may be wrought. But surrender to the higher Power, and

faith therein, are of the essence of all.


In non-religious terms, the experience is like the realization

that sometimes comes to a person who has never appreciated good music or

good books, and who all of a sudden "gets" the idea of the

pleasure, the value to be found in them. Thenceforth he proceeds with

delight to enjoy that in which he formerly had found no charm, no

meaning.
Similarly, the alcoholic come to a realization that the Higher

Power waits to help: that with God, truly "all things are

possible."


As outlined in the book "Alcoholics Anonymous," the steps

so far outlined in this article comprise the first three of twelve steps

in the entire technique. In the experience of alcoholics who have taken

all three, what has happened?


A New World
"I stood in the sunlight at last. Scales of pride and

prejudice fell from my eyes. A new world came into view."


Again: "After making this final agreement (not just for

another resolution) to let God be first in my life, the whole outlook

and horizon brightened up in a manner which I am unable to describe

except to say that it was `glorious.'


"There is no `cocky' feeling about this for me. I know

I am an alcoholic; and while I used to call on God to help me, my

conclusion is that I was simply asking God to help me drink alcohol

without its hurting me, which is a far different thing that asking Him

to help me not drink at all. So here I stand, and it is wonderful."
An artist: "A chart of my spiritual progress would look like

the graph of a business that had been hit by everything but an

earthquake; but there has been progress. It has cured me of a vicious

habit.
"Where my life had been full of mental turmoil, there is now

an ever increasing depth of calmness.
"Where there was a hit or miss attitude toward living, there

is now new direction and force.


"To me it makes sense, opens up a fascinating field of

endeavor, and is a challenge the acceptance of which can make of life

the `Adventure Magnificent'."
We Have to Live It
I myself, coming down from Cleveland, Ohio, to Houston on the

train, hardly out of my swaddling clothes on this thing, all of a sudden

felt so overwhelmingly illuminated and relieved by the idea that I no

longer had to think about "to drink or not to drink," that I dug

out my notebook and wrote down, How much of my life this realization

turned loose for things of real value!


As my oldest son wrote me yesterday: "Congratulations upon

your discovery that you and alcohol do not agree. Now that you give full

recognition to that fact, you cease to be on deceitful terms with

yourself and all of you can go in the same direction--which is

ahead!"
He hit the bullseye that time.
I'm free now because I'm all in one piece--no longer a

"house divided against itself."


But this spiritual life is not a theory. We have to live it.
Alcoholics Anonymous do not think it is enough merely for a man to

stay sober.


What of the swath of destruction the alcoholic has cut through the

lives of others by his refusal, failure or inability to consider the

needs of those who have trusted him and those who are dependent on him?
Remorse won't pay this off. There's some work to be done.
Now that the preliminaries of surrender and of faith are

established, the period of practice comes.


Here is where the other nine of the 12 points of the Alcoholics

Anonymous code comes into view.


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++++Message 3766. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: Richmond Walker

From: jenny andrews . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/5/2006 7:23:00 AM


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Is it true that Richmond W. did not get sober in AA?
________________________________________________
See http://hindsfoot.org/rwchrn.html and http://hindsfoot.org/rwfla1.html
Rich got sober the first time in the Oxford Group in

Boston in 1939. There was no AA group in Boston yet

at that time. He stayed sober in the Oxford Group for

two and a half years, before going back to drinking in

1941.
After a year and a half of drinking, he joined the

newly founded Boston AA group in May 1942, and never

drank again for the rest of his life.
In 1948, he put together the little meditational book

called "Twenty-Four Hours a Day," at the request of

the AA group in Daytona Beach, Florida.
The little book became the second most popular book in

AA history (exceeded only by the Big Book). It explained

how to carry out the eleventh step, how to practice the

presence of God, and how to attain soul-balance and inner

calm. It explained how to practice meditation by quieting

the mind and entering the Divine Silence in order to

enter the divine peace and calm and restore our souls.

(see http://hindsfoot.org/hp5rw.html )


His experience in the Oxford Group in 1939-1941 comes

out strongly in "Twenty-Four Hours a Day," coming partly

from Rich's own experience in the group, and coming partly

from his use of an Oxford Group work on prayer and meditation,

"God Calling," by Two Listeners. For those who would like

to bring modern AA back closer to Oxford Group beliefs and

practices, "Twenty-Four Hours a Day" is the most strongly

Oxford-Group-oriented work written by an early AA author.


Rich died on Mar. 25, 1965 (72 years old) with 22 years

of sobriety in AA.


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++++Message 3767. . . . . . . . . . . . The Texas Pamphlet 1940 (Part 5)

From: Jim M . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/29/2006 7:32:00 PM


IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
TWELVE STAGES TO OVERCOME ALCOHOLISM

Stumbling Blocks Must Be Removed by Patient Effort and

Daily Application of System

(Fifth of Six Articles)

____________________________________
If wishes were horses, beggars would ride; and the alcoholics

could come into his cure on the gallop.


True enough, the deliverance of the alcoholic already begun with

the soul-deep wish to be free of this weight that rides him relentlessly

and as odiously as the Old Man of the Sea rode Sindbad the Sailor in the

"Arabian Nights."


Then, as explained in the preceding article, has come the

recognition of human helplessness and complete reliance on the Supreme

Power as the one way out.
But the steps have only turned on the lights of faith and set the

stage for action. The leading man must now make his entrance, play his

part.
The first word of the first act is "honesty." To be

honest, says the dictionary, means to be straightforward in thought and

conduct; free from any deception or fraud.
How It Works
The chapter of the book, "Alcoholics Anonymous," entitled

"How It Works," begins: "Rarely have we seen a person fail

who has thoroughly followed our path. Those who do not recover are

people who cannot or will not completely give themselves to this

program, usually men and women who are constitutionally incapable of

being honest with themselves.


"There are such unfortunates. They seem to have been born that

way. They are naturally incapable of grasping and developing a manner of

living which demands rigorous honesty. Their chances are less than

average.
"There are those too, who suffer from grave emotional and

mental disorders; but many of them do recover if they have the capacity

to be honest."


You will note the cardinal emphasis on this business of being

truthful.


If the alcoholic who seeks relief by this technique is too

befogged, too jittery, to think honestly it is usually wise, on the

advice of a physician, for him first to be given the care that will

enable him to think straight, even if it means a period in hospital or

sanitarium.
You need your brain to beat alcohol. When the bees are buzzing in

it, and pink elephants are beginning to think you might soon have some

peanuts for them, it is hard, if not indeed impossible, to think

straight. Everybody is out of step but you.


The alcoholic, then, has to be his real self, and have the help of

God, to take the next steps on the road to freedom.


While Alcoholics Anonymous suggest a program numbering 12 stages,

individuals vary as to the ones they emphasize. Lives are different,

hence recoveries differ also.
Two General Units
The remaining nine steps therefore will be treated here as two

general units: one, "cleaning house"; and two, "helping

others." Let us examine them.
The alcoholic has been living an undisciplined , self-centered

life. Whether he admits it or not, competent outside observers could

demonstrate it in two minutes, The history of a leading physician in an

eastern city, whose guest I have been, may be extreme in illustrating

this, but it is typical.
After having been 35 years on the bottle, he has now been weaned

for nearly five years. He is one of the founders of Alcoholics

Anonymous. He told me this story:
"I had developed two dandy phobias that kept me in a spin. I

feared that I should not be able to sleep at night unless I went to bed

well oiled; and I feared that if I were under the influence during the

day, I should not be able to earn enough money to buy enough liquor to

get drunk enough to sleep at night so I could work the next day to get

more money to buy more liquor so I could go to sleep..... and so on and

so on, around the clock.
"So during the day I doped myself with heavy sedatives to hold

down the jitters, and at night, having sneaked my liquor in, I drank

myself to sleep.
"Where, in 35 years of such a squirrel-cage existence, was

there a chance for this doctor to live the generous life---one guided by

consideration for others? In the presence of his obsession with alcohol,

nothing else counted heavily, no matter how many or how frequent were

the isolated acts of kindness and generosity he performed.
He was living for his alcoholic self. All alcoholics, in varying

degree, live that way. Hence they have cluttered their lives with wrongs

to other people.




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