Aa history Lovers 2006 moderators Nancy Olson and Glenn F. Chesnut page



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It was put together by the late owner of this list,

Nancy Olson.

___________________________________


From: Ron Sessions

Try this link - it works for me...


http://www.a-1associates.com/aa/Authors.htm
Ron
___________________________________
From the moderator:
Al W. in Baltimore, who manages the website for

the East Baltimore AA Group, tells me that they have

recently changed to a new web server, which is case

sensitive. This has been what has been throwing

things off, and making people get error messages.
Since the new web server is case sensitive, this

means that if you put AA in capital letters, the

url won't work. If you type it as aa, the url

works just fine.


So we have two good places to look up this set of

Biographies of the Authors of the Big Book Stories:


http://www.a-1associates.com/aa/Authors.htm
http://silkworth.net/aabiography/storyauthors.html
I tested these just now, and both of the above

addresses work.

___________________________________
Nancy Olson (September 18, 1929 - March 25, 2005),

founded the AAHistoryBuffs in March 2000:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AAHistoryBuffs/
In March 2002, the group changed its name to the

AAHistoryLovers, the name under which it is still

known. Nancy continued to be the moderator down to

her death from congestive heart failure a little

over a year ago.
Nancy Olson was also the author of a major book on

AA history: "With a Lot of Help from Our Friends:

The Politics of Alcoholism"
http://hindsfoot.org/kno1.html

http://hindsfoot.org/kno2.html

http://hindsfoot.org/kno3.html
Her book is still considered almost mandatory

reading among the administrators at the U.S. Surgeon

General's Office and at a number of major national

foundations, because it gives the history of how

the Hughes Act was passed, the most successful piece

of alcoholism legislation enacted in the United States

in the twentieth century. All modern alcoholism

treatment facilities in the United States depend in

part on provisions originally laid out in the Hughes

Act and the other associated bills which Nancy helped

get passed in her capacity as aide to Senator Harold

Hughes.
The story of Nancy's life is given at:


http://hindsfoot.org/nomem1.html

http://hindsfoot.org/nomem2.html

http://hindsfoot.org/nomem3.html

http://hindsfoot.org/nomem4.html


-- Glenn C. (South Bend, Indiana)

Moderator of the AAHistoryLovers


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++++Message 3497. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: How many whom Dr Bob sponsored

stayed sober?

From: Mitchell K. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6/15/2006 3:55:00 PM
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mine said 2237 but I have to take into account the

U.S. Canadian exchange rate.


--- Jim B wrote:
> Carl wrote

> do you have any information on how many out of the

> five thousand people

> whom Dr. Bob sponsored stayed sober?

>

> My Ouija board says "3619."



> Jim

>

>



>

>

>


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++++Message 3498. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: How many whom Dr Bob sponsored

stayed sober?

From: edgarc@aol.com . . . . . . . . . . . . 6/16/2006 5:30:00 AM
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Carl wrote

do you have any information on how many out of the five thousand people

whom Dr. Bob sponsored stayed sober?
My Ouija board says "3619."

Jim


++++++++++++++++++

Mine says 3627, but it is admittedly an older model and some folks may have

gone out between editions....

Edgar C
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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++++Message 3499. . . . . . . . . . . . RE: How many whom Dr Bob sponsored

stayed sober?

From: Jan L. Robinson . . . . . . . . . . . . 6/17/2006 9:30:00 AM
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Mine says 5001, but it's from Alanon.
Jan R.
-----Original Message-----

From: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

[mailto:AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mitchell K.

Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2006 12:55 PM

To: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: [AAHistoryLovers] How many whom Dr Bob sponsored stayed sober?


mine said 2237 but I have to take into account the

U.S. Canadian exchange rate.


--- Jim B wrote:
> Carl wrote

> do you have any information on how many out of the

> five thousand people

> whom Dr. Bob sponsored stayed sober?

>

> My Ouija board says "3619."



> Jim

>

>



>

>

>


Yahoo! Groups Links
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++++Message 3500. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: Re: How many whom Dr Bob

sponsored stayed sober?

From: Robt Woodson . . . . . . . . . . . . 6/18/2006 10:25:00 AM
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Hello All,

I'm not the most knowledgeable member of this site by any means; and this

would be my first post here, if it passes by our good moderators...My own

belief


is that, perhaps the best response to this question would be

"enough".


Dr. Bob sponsored Henry "Clay" Pearce who worked the boilerrooms

of the


rubbershops when many of the other Akron members had no jobs and were fallen

on

hard times like Dr. Bob himself...he was always willing to give, was



described

as one of those who would give you the shirt off his own back if he thought

it

would help, he tried on several occaissions to give money to Dr. Bob, he was



described as a "stayer" (I have this from Sue and Smitty who

shared several

stories with me)...they laughed and said that whenever he came over he came

to

stay,... he, along with co-sponsor Jim Scott, the newsman, and booktrader,



also

sponsored by Dr. Bob, who was known to buy baskets of groceries too,

together

sponsored Bill Sipe, a very active twelfth stepper, (I have this from Bill's

son who has his Big Book inscribed with this information), who sponsored

Russ


Ickes, first manager of the Akron Intergroup Office, (I have this from a

tape


of Russ's lead at the East Akron Group) who in turn

sponsored my, now deceased, sponsor John Lietch, a past chairman of our

Akron

Intergroup, who worked for many years as Residential Life Co-ordinator at



Interval Brotherhood Home here in Akron and was a longtime Chairman of the

Founders Foundation, which then operated Dr. Bob's Home. John often told me

the

things that "old Russ" had told him.


He himself said without "Gratitude" we don't stay long...Russ said

"Without


Humility there is no Gratitude". The other thing he told me was perhaps

simplest of all...he said, "These oldtimer's aren't going to be here

forever

Woody; someone's got to keep this thing going!" I know today who he was



talking

about; and, if it is God's will, then it will be the fellows that I sponsor,

and

those that you sponsor too, who will do just that. And it is my hope that,



like

Dr. Bob's sponsee's, there are enough of them to do the job.


John was the youngest of those sponsored by Russ Icke's with Red Bates being

the oldest...John and Russ and their wives Jackie and Edith were neighbors

in

the Trailer Park at Sandy Beach off S. Main Street in the portage lakes here



in

Akron, Ohio.

I notice that there aren't a lot of people in between these few men, but I

know that those between are just not visible to the eye as each of these men

recieved and carried a very important message, faithfully and very

succesfully

over a long period of time. I may be an exception in knowing the history of

my

own sponsorship because there were so few between me and Dr. Bob, but the



action

of sponsorship, ...the unselfish principal which is illustrated here... is

the

same for each of us within this marvelous fellowship of Alcoholics



Anonymous,

these fellows just stayed awhile at the job and were good enough to pass

this

thing along to me.


A not too knowledgeable,

but very grateful,

Woody in Akron
edgarc@aol.com wrote:

Carl wrote

do you have any information on how many out of the five thousand people

whom Dr. Bob sponsored stayed sober?


My Ouija board says "3619."

Jim


++++++++++++++++++

Mine says 3627, but it is admittedly an older model and some folks may have

gone out between editions....

Edgar C
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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++++Message 3501. . . . . . . . . . . . The Origins of "Mocous"?

From: schaberg43 . . . . . . . . . . . . 6/19/2006 11:46:00 AM


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Here in Connecticut, I heard it again yesterday. The woman at the

meeting said she was feeling "mocous" (pronounced: Moe-cuss). It

is

a term generally (but not always) applied to newcomers and indicates



the jumbled, confused and usually foggy thought patterns that come

with early sobriety. "Befogged" might be a good synonym.


While this word is used with real regularity in our area and is

understood by all, I have been unable to find it in any dictionary.


Is this word in use elsewhere aroung the country?
Does anyone know the origins of the word and its use?
Is this an "AA-invented" word?
And, if so, is it the only one you know about?
Best,
Old Bill
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++++Message 3502. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: The Origins of "Mocous"?

From: sbanker914@aol.com . . . . . . . . . . . . 6/19/2006 1:29:00 PM


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In a message dated 6/19/2006 2:52:29 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,

schaberg@aol.com writes:


Is this word in use elsewhere aroung the country?
I heard it a lot when I got sober in NYC in the late '80's. We spelled it
MOCUS
"Mentally Out Cruising Uncharted Space"
Susan

NYC
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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++++Message 3503. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: The Origins of "Mocous"?

From: Tom Hickcox . . . . . . . . . . . . 6/19/2006 5:22:00 PM


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At 10:46 6/19/2006 , Old Bill wrote:
>Here in Connecticut, I heard it again yesterday. The woman at the

>meeting said she was feeling "mocous" (pronounced: Moe-cuss).

It is

>a term generally (but not always) applied to newcomers and indicates



>the jumbled, confused and usually foggy thought patterns that come

>with early sobriety. "Befogged" might be a good synonym.

>

>While this word is used with real regularity in our area and is



>understood by all, I have been unable to find it in any dictionary.

>

>Is this word in use elsewhere aroung the country?



>

>Does anyone know the origins of the word and its use?

>

>Is this an "AA-invented" word?



>

>And, if so, is it the only one you know about?


My lovely wife Jean, dos June 3, 1988, got sober and lived in the New York

City area for 17 years afterwards and says that the word is an A.A. word

and means "Moving slow and out of focus." The synonym she used is

"befuddled."


It is applied mostly to new comers but someone with a few twenty-four hours

may say, "I'm feeling mocous."


I had not heard the word used here in Baton Rouge A.A. until she used it.
Tommy H in Baton Rouge
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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++++Message 3504. . . . . . . . . . . . RE: How many whom Dr Bob sponsored

stayed sober?

From: ArtSheehan . . . . . . . . . . . . 6/20/2006 9:24:00 AM
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Hi
Dr Bob and Sister Ignatia together helped around 5,000 alcoholics

while they were patients in St Thomas Hospital. Dr Bob's main activity

was ministering to them as an attending physician (not as a sponsor)

during their hospital stay (and he never accepted any fee for his

services). For this, in his eulogy at Dr Bob's funeral, Bill W

rightfully called him "the prince of the 12th Steppers."


Dr Bob only lived for 15 years after sobering up. 15 years equals

5,475 days (leap years days not included). While Dr Bob may have

sponsored some of those 5,000 patients, the notion that he sponsored

5,000 members over the course of his 5,475 sober days on this planet

makes for an entertaining fable but little more than that.
Cheers

Arthur
-----Original Message-----

From: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

[mailto:AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jan L. Robinson

Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2006 8:31 AM

To: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

Subject: RE: [AAHistoryLovers] How many whom Dr Bob sponsored stayed

sober?
Mine says 5001, but it's from Alanon.


Jan R.
-----Original Message-----

From: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

[mailto:AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mitchell K.

Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2006 12:55 PM

To: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: [AAHistoryLovers] How many whom Dr Bob sponsored stayed

sober?
mine said 2237 but I have to take into account the

U.S. Canadian exchange rate.


--- Jim B wrote:
> Carl wrote

> do you have any information on how many out of the

> five thousand people

> whom Dr. Bob sponsored stayed sober?

>

> My Ouija board says "3619."



> Jim

>

>



>

>

>


Yahoo! Groups Links
------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

--------------------~-->

Yahoo! Groups gets a make over. See the new email design.

http://us.click.yahoo.com/phWpKB/lOaOAA/xGEGAA/219olB/TM

--------------------------------------------------------------------~-

>
Yahoo! Groups Links


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++++Message 3505. . . . . . . . . . . . Big Book Story Author Interview (1

of 4)


From: Bill Lash . . . . . . . . . . . . 6/21/2006 8:59:00 AM
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Interview With the Author of "Doctor, Alcoholic, Addict"

First in a series of articles on authors of Big Book stories

AA Grapevine, July 1995
Dr. Paul O.'s story, "Doctor, Alcoholic, Addict" is published in

the Third

Edition of the Big Book; his remarks on acceptance, which appear on pages

449 and 450, have been helpful to many AA members over the years. This

interview was conducted by telephone to Dr. Paul's home in California.
How did you come to write the story that's in the Big Book?
The editor of the Grapevine--a woman named Paula C.--was also the

chairperson of the committee to review the stories. She wrote to tell me

that the magazine was going to use an article I'd written on why doctors

shouldn't prescribe pills for alcoholics. So she knew my writing a little

bit and she asked me if I had a dual problem and would I be willing to write

an article about it for consideration in the Big Book. My reaction to that

was the same as my reaction when it was suggested I come to AA--I thought it

was one of the dumbest ideas I'd ever heard and I ignored her letter. Later

on she called and asked for the article, and I lied and said I hadn't had

time to write it. She extended the deadline and called me a second time. I

had a gal working in the office with me who was in the program, and she

thought it would be nice to have typed a story that might end up in the Big

Book, so she said to me, "You write it, I'll type it, and we'll send it

in."


So that's what we did. But by that time they had done another printing of

the Second Edition, and I thought, Fine, that means they won't use it. But

Paula said she liked it and the Grapevine published it with the title

"Bronzed Mocassins" and an illustration of a pair of bronze

mocassins.

Eventually it was put in the Big Book, but the title was changed, and my

guess is that they wanted to show that an alcoholic could be a professional

and be an addict, but that wouldn't make him not an alcoholic. It worked

well but maybe it overshot the mark, and now one of the most uncomfortable

things for me is when people run up to me at a meeting and tell me how glad

they are the story is in the book. They say they've been fighting with their

home group because their home group won't let them talk about drugs. So they

show their group the story and they say, "By God, now you'll have to

let me


talk about drugs." And I really hate to see the story as a divisive

thing. I


don't think we came to AA to fight each other.
Is there anything you regret having written in your story?
Well, I must say I'm really surprised at the number of people who come up to

me and ask me confidentially if what they've heard on the very best

authority--usually from their sponsor--is true: that there are things in my

story I want to change, or that I regret having written it, or that I want

to take it out because it says so much about drugs, or that I've completely

changed my mind that AA is the answer or even that acceptance is the answer.

I've also heard--on the best authority!--that I've died or gotten drunk or

on pills. The latest one was that my wife Max died and that I got so

depressed I got drunk. So, is there anything I'd like to change? No. I

believe what I said more now than when I wrote it.


Do you think that your story might help those who are dually addicted?
I think it does. I think the story makes clear the truth that an alcoholic

can also be an addict, and indeed that an alcoholic has a constitutional

right to have as many problems as he wants! But I also think that if you're

not an alcoholic, being an addict doesn't make you one. The way I see it, an

alcoholic is a person who can't drink and who can't use drugs, and an addict

is a person who can't use drugs and can't drink. But that doesn't mean that

every AA meeting has to be open to a discussion of drugs if it doesn't want

to. Every meeting has the right to say it doesn't want drugs discussed.

People who want to discuss drugs have other places where they can go to talk

about that. And AA is very open to giving the Steps and Traditions to other

groups who want to use them. I know this from my own experience, because I

wrote to the General Service Office and got permission to start Pills

Anonymous and Chemical Dependency Anonymous. I did that when I was working

in the field of chemical dependency. We started groups but I didn't go to

them because I get everything I need from AA. I don't have any trouble

staying away from talking about drugs, and I never introduce myself as an

alcoholic/addict.
I'm annoyed--or maybe irritated is a better word--by the people who keep

insisting that AA should broaden to include drugs and addictions other than

alcohol. In fact I hear it said that AA should change its name to Addicts

Anonymous. I find that a very narrow-minded view based on people's personal

opinions and not on good sense. History tells us that the Washingtonians

spread themselves so thin they evaporated. Jim B. says the greatest thing

that ever happened in AA was the publication of the Big Book, because it put

in writing what the program was and made it available all over the world. So

wherever you go it's the same program. I don't see how you could change the

program unless you changed the book and I can't see that happening.


It's a question of singleness of purpose?
That singleness of purpose thing is so significant. It seems to be working;

why would we change it? I can't think of any change that would be an

improvement.
Nowadays drunks seem to come to meetings already dried out, but that wasn't

always the case.


No, it wasn't. You don't get Twelfth Step calls as dramatic as they used to

be. Now I find that if you're called upon to make a Twelfth Step call, it'll

be on somebody who is in the hospital. You find out when they're available

and not in some other kind of meeting, and make an appointment. But this

might change as the number of treatment programs begins to fade out.
I used to make "cold turkey" calls, where the alcoholic hadn't

asked for

help. One time I went to see this guy who was described to me as a big husky

fellow. He was holed up in a motel. I found out from the manager of the

motel that he was on the second floor, and as I was walking up the outside

stairs to get to his place, I thought to myself, if this guy comes charging

out the door, he could easily throw me over the stair railing and I'd end up

on the concrete. So I thought, well, the good news is I'd probably be one of

AA's first martyrs. Then I thought, yeah, but I'd be an anonymous martyr. I

made the call anyhow, and he got sober for a while.


In your Big Book story, you say that acceptance is the key to everything. I

wonder if you've ever had a problem accepting what life hands you.


I think today that my job really is to enjoy life whether I like it or not.

I don't like everything I have to accept. In fact, if everything was to my

specifications and desires there would be no problem with acceptance. It's

accepting things I don't like that is difficult. It's accepting when I'm not

getting my own way. Yes, I find it very difficult at times.
Anything specific?
Nothing major, though it sometimes seems major that I have to accept living

with my wife Max and her ways of doing things! She is an entirely different



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