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wrote:

hi history lovers,


Page 140 of To Employers says: "Can it be appreciated that he has been

a victim of crooked thinking, directly caused by the action of alcohol

on his brain?"
One of our members asked why would Bill put such an important piece of

information in the chapter to employers,instead of perhaps one of the

chapters at the beginning of the book.
Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks from Tracy

The Barking Big Book Study Group

England
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++++Message 3263. . . . . . . . . . . . RE: Crooked thinking

From: ArtSheehan . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/17/2006 11:43:00 AM


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Bill didn't write the chapter "To Employers" (just the first

paragraph). Hank P wrote the chapter.


I don't get a sense that the Big Book was written in the manner or

with the intent that is often presumed in analyzing it (perhaps

over-analyzing it might be a better way of putting it).
The member who asked the question is using a form of reasoning that

appears sincere, but flawed in its analytical gymnastics. It does

little more than open the door to what can be an endless amount of

speculation that serves more to distract rather than inform.


Many Big Book chapters have a specific target audience (usually

denoted in the chapter titles). In this case it's employers.


The underlying assumption that the importance of a sentence is somehow

enhanced or diminished by its appearance in an early or later part of

the book is a flawed assumption being treated as fact.
The most popular, and perhaps important, portion of the Big Book, read

at many meetings comes from its 5th chapter "How It Works." Trust

me,

there is no need to move this chapter further toward the beginning of



the book to emphasize its importance. It stands on its own content as

do all the other chapters.


Cheers

Arthur
-----Original Message-----

From: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

[mailto:AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Charlene C.

Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2006 12:57 PM

To: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: [AAHistoryLovers] Crooked thinking
it would be my guess that employers are more inclined to think in

intellectual terms than medical or spiritual. especially in that

time, when alcoholism was considered more of a moral dilema than a

spiritual mallody or terminal illness.


just a thought.

C. Cook
trixiebellaa wrote:

hi history lovers,
Page 140 of To Employers says: "Can it be appreciated that he has

been


a victim of crooked thinking, directly caused by the action of alcohol
on his brain?"
One of our members asked why would Bill put such an important piece of
information in the chapter to employers,instead of perhaps one of the

chapters at the beginning of the book.


Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks from Tracy

The Barking Big Book Study Group

England
SPONSORED LINKS

Addiction recovery program Recovery from addiction

Addiction recovery center Christian addiction recovery

Alcoholics anonymous


---------------------------------

YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


Visit your group "AAHistoryLovers" on the web.
To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:

AAHistoryLovers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com


Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of

Service.
---------------------------------


---------------------------------

Yahoo! Mail

Use Photomail to share photos without annoying attachments.
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
Yahoo! Groups Links
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++++Message 3264. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: "Stump the Archivist"

From: sbanker914@aol.com . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/17/2006 5:29:00 AM


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In a message dated 3/16/2006 4:34:58 PM Eastern Standard Time, jct3@juno.com

writes:


Did Bill Wilson have a mistress who lived in Miami?

I found the following from Nan Robertson's book:


. . . quotes Nan Robertson, author of Getting Better: Inside Alcoholics

Anonymous (1988), as follows:


"Particularly during his sober decades in AA in the forties, fifties,

and


sixties, Bill Wilson was a compulsive womanizer. His flirtations and his

adulterous behavior filled him with guilt, but he continued to stray off the

reservation. His last and most serious love affair . . . began when he was

in

his



sixties. She was important to him until the end of his life, and was

remembered

in

a financial agreement with AA. (p. 36)"


This last mistress, Helen W., actually received 1.5% of the royalties from

the Big Book after Bill's death. As for Bill's wife, Lois,

"she never

mentioned

his philandering," writes Robertson in this history of AA's

founders.


Susan Banker

NYC
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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++++Message 3265. . . . . . . . . . . . There'' s Nothing The Matter With Me

From: David A Putnam . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/17/2006 8:01:00 PM


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In this story we read that the author drink "Sneaky Pete, Bayzo, Canned

Heat and Shoe Polish.


I know what canned heat and shoe polish is, but can someone enlightem

me as to what Sneaky Pete and Bayzo is?


Thanks,
Dave P

Westmont Illinois

Monday Night Big Book Meeting
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++++Message 3266. . . . . . . . . . . . medallions

From: Lee Nickerson . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/18/2006 10:11:00 AM


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In a taped interview with Jimmy D. (Sober since 1947, died 1999) of

Portland, Maine, he told me that Arthur W. gave out medallions to his

pigeons. He apparently started this practice in 1946 after the

Portland Group (still going) got started. Jimmy donated his medallions

to the archives. Arthur got these from a company called Bright Star

Press which at the time was in Illinois and I believe moved to Texas.

I am not saying that the practice of medallions started here, just

that this is the earliest I have heard of it in Maine. I also had an

old timer tell me that they used to give out nickels to make phone

calls.


lee
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++++Message 3267. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: "Stump the Archivist"

From: Tom Hickcox . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/17/2006 10:55:00 PM


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At 19:01 3/16/2006 , James Blair wrote:
> JANUARY 2006 STUMP THE ARCHIVIST

>

> Did Bill Wilson have a mistress who lived in Miami?



>

>Who he bonked or didn't bonk has nothing to do with AA history.

>

> When and where did the poker chip tradition start for the groups?



>

>Chips, Medallions and Birthdays

>

>

>



>

>

>The traditions of chips, medallions and birthdays vary in different



parts of

>the country and I thought it would be interesting to look up some of the

>history on them.

>
Neither do the traditions of chips, medallions, and

birthdays/anniversaries. They are local traditions and not part of A.A.
Tommy in Baton Rouge
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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++++Message 3268. . . . . . . . . . . . RE: There'' s Nothing The Matter

With Me


From: Joe Nugent . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/18/2006 3:48:00 PM
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"Bayzo" was a term first used during prohibition to describe

someone who

drank bay rum, because of its high alcohol content.
Bay rum was used as an aftershave, and has that distinctive old school

smell.
_____


From: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

[mailto:AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of David A Putnam

Sent: Friday, March 17, 2006 8:02 PM

To: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

Subject: [AAHistoryLovers] There' s Nothing The Matter With Me
In this story we read that the author drink "Sneaky Pete, Bayzo, Canned

Heat and Shoe Polish.


I know what canned heat and shoe polish is, but can someone enlightem

me as to what Sneaky Pete and Bayzo is?


Thanks,
Dave P

Westmont Illinois

Monday Night Big Book Meeting

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++++Message 3269. . . . . . . . . . . . Sneaky Pete and Bayzo

From: prpllady51 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/18/2006 4:04:00 PM


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Sneaky Pete was slang for a pint bottle of cheap muscatel with grain

alcohol added to pump up the proof to 40. It cost around 35 cents

and was a flat bottle, which would fit in one's back pocket.
Bayzo was the slang for Bay Rum. Bay rum was used as an aftershave.
Jocelyn

Parkway West

Pittsburgh PA
David A Putnam wrote:

In this story we read that the author drink "Sneaky Pete, Bayzo,

Canned

Heat and Shoe Polish.


I know what canned heat and shoe polish is, but can someone

enlightem

me as to what Sneaky Pete and Bayzo is?
Thanks,
Dave P

Westmont Illinois

Monday Night Big Book Meeting
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++++Message 3270. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: medallions

From: James Blair . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/18/2006 8:09:00 PM


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Lee wrote

He apparently started this practice in 1946 after the

Portland Group (still going) got started. Jimmy donated his medallions to

the archives. Arthur got these from a company called Bright Star Press

which at the time was in Illinois and I believe moved to Texas.
Brigh Star's web site claims that they went into business in 1950.

Jim
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++++Message 3271. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: Stump the Archivists

From: Carter Elliott . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/18/2006 8:28:00 PM


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As Bill Sees It contains thirty-one entries sourced to "Letter,

1966". Do we

know if this letter was a single, philosophical essay or letters collected

from


his general correspondence?
Carter E., Blacksburg, VA
---------------------------------

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Bring photos to life! New PhotoMail makes sharing a breeze.
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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++++Message 3272. . . . . . . . . . . . Re: authorship of Chapter 10

From: johnlawlee . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/18/2006 12:28:00 PM


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--- In AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com, "ArtSheehan"

wrote:


>

> Bill didn't write the chapter "To Employers" (just the first

> paragraph). Hank P wrote the chapter.

>

> I don't get a sense that the Big Book was written in the manner or



> with the intent that is often presumed in analyzing it (perhaps

> over-analyzing it might be a better way of putting it).

>

> The member who asked the question is using a form of reasoning that



> appears sincere, but flawed in its analytical gymnastics. It does

> little more than open the door to what can be an endless amount of

> speculation that serves more to distract rather than inform.

>

> Many Big Book chapters have a specific target audience (usually



> denoted in the chapter titles). In this case it's employers.

>

> The underlying assumption that the importance of a sentence is



somehow

> enhanced or diminished by its appearance in an early or later part

of

> the book is a flawed assumption being treated as fact.



>

> The most popular, and perhaps important, portion of the Big Book,

read

> at many meetings comes from its 5th chapter "How It Works."



Trust

me,


> there is no need to move this chapter further toward the beginning

of

> the book to emphasize its importance. It stands on its own content



as

> do all the other chapters.

>

> Cheers


> Arthur

>

> -----Original Message-----



> From: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

> [mailto:AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Charlene C.

> Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2006 12:57 PM

> To: AAHistoryLovers@yahoogroups.com

> Subject: Re: [AAHistoryLovers] Crooked thinking

>

> it would be my guess that employers are more inclined to think in



> intellectual terms than medical or spiritual. especially in that

> time, when alcoholism was considered more of a moral dilema than a

> spiritual mallody or terminal illness.

>

> just a thought.



> C. Cook

>

> Hank Parkhurst is generally cited as the author of



"To Employers" [Chapter 10 of Big Book]. I've always found that

hard


to believe, based on the contrast between the divergent styles of

Chapter 10 and Hank's story in the First Edition. Hank's story, "The

Unbeliever" is choppy, almost manic. It's filled with

elipses,exclamations, etc. I've always suspected that Bill Wilson did

the actual writing of Chapter 10, although Hank supplied many of the

ideas for Chapter 10. Bill, Hank and Ruth Hock shared a small office

in Newark when they put together the Big Book. I don't see any

language in Hank's story which is similar to the content or style of

Chapter 10. Bill was very generous in giving credit for the

contributions of others; for instance, Bill referred to William James

as a "founder" of AA, even though Professor James had been dead

for


decades when AA was founded.

The authors of Chapter 10 are laying out a big order for employers.

They're asking employers to read the Big Book and use it to "12

step"


their employees. I don't see any information in Chapter 10 which is

inconsistent with the first five chapters. The intended audience was

different. It's not a different message.

john lee


member

pittsburgh

> trixiebellaa




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