A typology of Housing Search Behaviour in the Owner-Occupier Sector


A culturally embedded, but limited OBE approach: Levy and Lee, 2004



Download 13.27 Mb.
Page18/60
Date30.04.2018
Size13.27 Mb.
#42625
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   60

4.10 A culturally embedded, but limited OBE approach: Levy and Lee, 2004


Levy and Lee’s (2004) approach to the housing decision making process expressly breaks the decisions down to the sub household level, considering the role of individual family members across the search process.

Conceptually the decision is closer to organizational decision making than individualistic approaches. Levy and Lee approached the research using a four-stage approach to the decision-making process (problem recognition, search, evaluation of alternatives and final choice), but added a fifth stage (product specification) as the estate agents interviewed suggested a further decision occurred. This stage included specifying the general location, price range and main attributes. At this stage family members had different roles, for example the men specifying location requirements and women the physical requirements. This was in part a reflection of culturally embedded norms of behaviour, and as such differed across groups in society. The issue here is not the precise roles, rather their work reveals that not only are aspirations and preferences culturally formed, but the decision making process internally is itself culturally formed. The relationship between estate agents and households may also transgress sterile information provision and relate emotionally (Levy et al., 2008). In this sense, the decision process may reflect the role of estate agents and households performing the market, and has the potential for new forms of arrangement between them to change behaviour (Smith, 2006).



Fig. 4.10: Role players and family decision process: Levy and Lee, 2004

Source: Levy and Lee, 2004, P.330

Levy and Lee’s model shows that information gathering is an iterative and deepening process. The household begins with a broad specification of requirements, and pursues more specific information as the process continues. They suggest that household members are likely to take different roles in the information search process at different stages.


Download 13.27 Mb.

Share with your friends:
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   60




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2023
send message

    Main page