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Homework

It is our belief that good study habits and consistent completion of homework are necessary for success in college. Absence from school does not excuse cadets from completing or turning in homework. Completion of homework is mandatory. The purpose of homework at OMI is to reinforce material covered in class, to accelerate learning outside of class, and to prepare cadets for the next lesson. Homework is one of many assessments that OMI teachers design and use to measure student learning. Cadets must complete homework assignments regularly and to the best of their ability. Homework effort and quality of homework are components of cadet grades in all academic courses. Cadets should expect to spend about 2 hours each night completing homework in the 6th through 8th grades and more time in the higher grades. Advanced Placement classes will require more homework than the typical class.

If absent, the cadet is responsible for arranging for homework assignments. Cadets are also encouraged to contact a classmate for appropriate assignments. In the event a cadet is suspended from school, the parent/guardian may request homework assignments through the school office and the school will make a reasonable attempt to provide those assignments to the parent.




Parent-Teacher Conferences

Teachers and TAC Teams will schedule parent-teacher conferences on an as-needed basis. Parents are also encouraged to schedule parent-teacher-student conferences whenever they wish to discuss academic concerns with a child’s teachers. If conferences are desired, parents should call OMI and request that a teacher contact them. Teachers will strive to return all phone calls within 24 hours. Conferences may be scheduled ½ hour before school begins or after school ends.
Uniforms The OMI uniform standards are intended to further the mission of OMI, to minimize disruption and promote the health, safety and welfare of all students. Because OMI is a military academy and standards of personal appearance are integral to the successful operation of any military organization, a cadet’s refusal to comply with established grooming and uniform regulations is regarded as an act of defiance. Therefore, all such acts of non-compliance are grounds for suspension and/or expulsion. OMI reserves the right to send home any cadet whose appearance, in the opinion of the school administration, constitutes a blatant disregard for the spirit and/or letter of these appearance/uniform standards. The administration is the final authority in determining whether a cadet’s appearance warrants such consequences as being sent home to correct deficiencies, suspension, or expulsion. OMI expects cadets to wear the complete and proper uniform on their way to and from school each day. Cadets are held accountable for their appearance and conduct both on and off campus when in uniform. OMI cadets represent themselves and the Academy at all times and are expected to do so with pride and integrity.


Grades 6-8: Promotion to the Next Grade Level

OMI is a college preparatory school dedicated to academic excellence. In keeping with our commitment to rigorous academics and preparation for college, OMI requires that cadets demonstrate both academic success and motivation to achieve in order to be selected to continue to the next grade level. Cadets selected to attend the next grade level must receive passing grades in their courses. Students earn 5 credits for each semester class passed. Students do not receive credit if they receive an ”F” in a course. Cadets who receive a semester grade of “F” in more than one course are subject to retention in their current grade.
Grades 9-12: Credits Toward High School Graduation

There are minimum credit requirements that students must complete in order to graduate from OMI. Students must pass a course in order to receive credit for the course. These requirements also reflect the minimum A-G requirements that are the coursework necessary for admission into the University of California and California State University systems. The OMI high school graduation requirements are listed below.


Required Subjects Credits Semesters

English (10 ea in Grs 9-12) 40 8 sem.

Math 30 6 sem.

(2 semesters per subject, Including Alg I, Alg II & Geom)



Science 30 6 sem.

(Including Physical Sci., Life Sci. + 1 other)



World History 10 2 sem.

US History 10 2 sem.

Government/ Economics 10 2 sem.

Foreign Language 20 4 sem.

Visual/ Performing Arts 10 2 sem.

English Electives 20 4 sem.

(ESL, Language Arts or Honors)



Electives 40 8 sem.

(i.e.: ESL, Language Arts, Honors Eng., Art, Music)



Ldrs of Character / PE 40 8 sem.
TOTAL 260 minimum
Note: To have 10th grade standing, cadets must have completed 60 credits prior to enrollment for their 10th grade year. To have 11th grade standing, cadets must have completed 130 credits prior to enrollment for their 11th grade year. To have 12th grade standing, cadets must have completed 190 credits prior to enrollment for their 12th grade year.
Information to Parents
OMI provides annual notification to parents through its Handbook as to the transferability of courses to other public high schools and whether each individual course offered by OMI meets college entrance requirements.
Special Senior Electives

Some seniors take a full load of academic classes, but other seniors may have one period during the school day with no required academic class. Those seniors are allowed to choose from a small selection of elective courses, including service as an Administrative, Office or Teacher Assistant, or Yearbook Staff.


Participation in High School Graduation

In order to graduate, participate in graduation ceremonies, and receive a diploma, students must complete all graduation requirements. In addition, students must also pass the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE), successfully complete a senior thesis project, and adhere to all citizenship standards.


California Scholarship Federation (C.S.F.) and California Junior Scholarship Federation (C.J.S.F.):

OMI has chapters of both the California Scholarship Federation for high school students and the California Junior Scholarship Federation for middle school students. Founded in 1921 to honor students especially outstanding in academic achievement in California’s secondary schools, the Federation sets high qualifications for membership during the first three weeks of each semester. Eligibility is determined by the following criteria:




  • A = 3 points

  • B = 1 point.

  • C grades or below are not counted

Subjects are divided into three lists:



  • List 1 includes all subjects that meet a-g requirements for admission to University of California and CSU System.

  • List 2 includes all other subjects which consistently require homework. At OMI, List 2 includes the LOC course.

  • List 3 includes all other subjects, except Physical Education and Teacher’s Aide.

Additional CSF/CJSF Policies:



  • A student must earn 10 points. Seven of the 10 points must be earned in classes on Lists 1 and 2; two classes must be from List 1.

  • Only five courses will be counted.

  • A grade of “D” or “F” in any course disqualifies a student.

Honor membership in C.JS.F. is earned through qualifying for membership three semesters or more during the 7th and 8th grade years and at least once during the 8th grade year. Honor members are eligible to apply for special C.J.S.F. scholarships and awards. A cadet who has been a C.J.S.F. member for six semesters earns a special 100% certificate and special notation on the permanent academic transcript.


Life membership in C.S.F. is earned through qualifying for membership four semesters or more during the sophomore and junior years and at least once during senior year. Life members are eligible to apply for special C.S.F. scholarships to many colleges in and out of California. A cadet who has been a C.S.F. member for six semesters earns a special 100% certificate and special notation on the permanent academic transcript.
National Honor Society (N.H.S.)

The National Honor Society is a national organization that recognizes outstanding academic achievement, personal character, and service to others. Students in grades 10-12 who meet the GPA requirements are invited to apply for membership. A faculty committee makes the final selection based on the published guidelines set by the national organization. Students who fail to maintain an exemplary disciplinary record may be removed from NHS, using the guidelines and procedures set by the national organization and Oakland Military Institute.


National Spanish Honor Society

OMI also has a chapter of the National Spanish Honor Society called “El Mundo Hispano.” Membership in the Society is open to cadets enrolled in Spanish 3 or above with grades of B or better in all previous and current semesters of Spanish. The Society performs service to the school and participates in the National Spanish Examination which qualifies cadets for college scholarships based on their performance.


Honor Organization

The highest honor given to a company, the Honor Organization Award is given during the last week of school to that company which has achieved the highest total of points during the school year. Companies receive 100 points for each streamer they earn during the year with the exception of the STAR Test Streamer (worth either 1000 or 300 points).


Streamers are awarded weekly, monthly, and quarterly so as many as 35,000 points can be earned by companies during the year. The award includes a standing trophy and the right for each cadet in the company to wear the honor unit ribbon on the dress uniform for the duration of his/her enrollment at OMI. An appropriate bronze numeral attachment shall be awarded for subsequent awards. Points are posted by the Battalion Command Sergeant Major on an Honor Unit Bulletin board located inside the main wing of the school building. In addition, companies can award a platoon honor streamer to recognize significant achievement by a platoon.


PHILOSOPHY OF THE CITIZENSHIP PROGRAM
The Oakland Military Institute College Preparatory Academy believes that each young person wants to succeed and achieve to the greatest extent possible. Our mission is to train cadets to be LEADERS OF CHARACTER, COMPETENCE, and PRESENCE.


  • Character can be complex to define, but for our purposes, character is HOW cadets live out their core values. How cadets treat themselves and others and live in the ever-changing and very demanding adult world.




  • Competence is the ability to do your job well. While in school, a cadet’s primary job is to do well in classes, but another important job is to do well in assigned leadership roles as cadet squad leaders, platoon-level leaders, company-level leaders, or battalion-level leaders.




  • Presence is the way an individual looks, acts, dresses, walks, and talks. Leaders of presence are immediately recognized as people others want to follow for all of the right reasons.

All of these three leadership characteristics embody our definition of a cadet with good citizenship.


We also believe that all persons, from time to time, make poor choices and must face consequences for those choices. It is our belief in the inherent goodness of people coupled with our awareness of the human condition that prompts us to provide a citizenship program which rewards positive choices and actions and which provides clear, fair, consistent, and appropriate consequences for poor choices and actions.
It is critical that cadets develop skills of self-discipline so that upon graduation from OMI, the character traits they have been taught at OMI can become lived reality in the adult world.
In human psychology, the theory of Behaviorism is present when a system of rewards and punishments is meted out to learners. The theories of Cognitive Psychology say that learners learn best by observing positive modeling by peers and caring adults. The theory of Socio-cultural development says that learning is best accomplished by humans having meaningful interaction with peers and more knowledgeable adults who can shape a less-experienced learner’s behavior by both modeling and counseling. The OMI Citizenship Program takes each of these theories and integrates them into a unified effort with four goals:
Goal 1: Cadets will experience positive modeling and counseling from peers, senior ranking cadets, and adult mentors.
Goal 2: Cadets receive rewards for positive choices that benefit the individual and the larger school community.
Goal 3: Cadets receive fair, consistent and appropriate consequences for poor choices.
Goal 4: Cadets receive intensive, non-judgmental support to understand the value of self-discipline and to make necessary changes in behavior that result in success at school and in life.
THE MERIT AND DEMERIT SYSTEM
Cadets are at a critical developmental stage in which they require encouragement, support, motivation, nurturing, inspiration, and occasional behavior modification. Merits are reward points that acknowledge effort, enthusiasm, hard work, and contribution to the school community. Conversely, demerits are negative consequence points that are assigned to cadets for inappropriate behavior and poor choices.
Merits

Merit points are awarded when cadets make positive choices and help further the mission and goals of the Academy. Merit points are not necessarily awarded for every good deed a cadet does. Merits should not necessarily be awarded because a cadet says to an adult, “May I do something for you for merit points?” Instead, when an adult observes a cadet doing something positive and would like to recognize that behavior, the adult may choose to award merit points. Only adult staff members of the Academy may award merit points. Both halves of the merit form must be turned into the Grizzly Exchange within one week of issue for processing. Merit points are awarded using the following guidelines. Note in brackets after each category the adult(s) who is/are authorized to award merit points for that category.



Earning Merit Points


  • One merit point may be awarded for each 15 minutes of service to the school OUTSIDE of class time (or major fraction thereof). [Any adult staff member may award.]

  • One merit point (per cadet per day) may be awarded by classroom teachers for notable achievements in classroom work, such as perfect or high scores on assignments, insightful comments or questions in class discussions, obvious diligence in completing assignments or complying with classroom expectations, or for exceptional work on a class activity or assignment. [Any classroom teacher or instructional aide]

  • One merit point may be awarded for participating in school spirit activities such as attending an OMI interscholastic athletic event to cheer on school-mates. [Athletic Director or his designee]

  • One merit point may be awarded each time a cadet gets the Parent Bulletin entry signed in the planner. [TAC Teams will check this approximately once per quarter.]

  • One merit point may be awarded for cadets who return requested documents or forms requiring parent signatures to the school office, counseling office, Director of Instruction, Superintendent’s Office, or Commandant’s Office within 24 hours of the form/document being given to the cadet. [Adult requesting the document/form]

  • One merit point may be awarded each time a cadet participates in any club meeting. [Club moderator]

  • One merit point may be awarded to a cadet who, AT BREAK TIME, successfully uses that day’s Word of the Day in a complete, proper sentence demonstrating its meaning. [Administrators]

  • One merit point may be awarded each time a cadet participates in Cadet Student Council (ASB) \activities. [ASB Advisor]

  • One merit point may be awarded for each one dollar’s worth of fund-raising profit a cadet contributes to ASB fund-raising activities. [ASB Advisors].

  • One merit point may be awarded for each canned food or toiletry item brought during a community service drive. One merit point per dollar’s worth of toys may be awarded for each toy brought during the Christmas Toy Drive. [TAC Team}

  • Five merit points may be awarded to cadets who exhibit exceptionally courteous behavior with OMI campus guests [School Administrators]

  • Ten merits may be awarded to each cadet on their birthday when they are present at morning formation. [SGM]

  • Up to 25 merit points may be awarded each time a cadets’ parent/guardian participates in an OMI parent meeting, parent education program, or similar event. [Superintendent or designee]

  • 25 merit points may be awarded by a teacher when a student scores in bands 3 or 4 on a standardized benchmark exam. [Teacher]

  • Fifty merits points may be awarded each athletic season to cadets who complete an entire season as a member of an interscholastic sports team. [Athletic Director]

  • Up to fifty merit points may be awarded per semester for cadets who act as Peer Mentors or Counselors [Peer Mentor Sponsor]

  • Up to fifty merit points may be awarded per semester for cadets who act as Admissions Ambassadors [Admissions Director]

  • Up to twenty-five merit points may be awarded at the end of each month (September through May) for exceptional performance in a cadet leadership role (squad leader, platoon, company, or battalion level leader or staff member). [TAC Officers/NCOs]

  • Up to one hundred merit points may be awarded each academic quarter to any cadet based upon the GPA for that quarter/semester, provided the cadet does not have any failing grade(s) during that quarter according to the following:

    • 2.0-2.5 GPA = 10 merits

    • 2.51-2.99 = 20 merits

    • 3.0-3.49 = 30 merits

    • 3.50-3.99 = 50 merits

    • 4.00 or higher = 100 merits

[Director of Instruction]]

  • 100 merits may be awarded for each OMI STAR Test on which the cadet earns a score of PROFICIENT or higher.

  • 100 merits may be awarded for each OMI STAR Test on which the cadet went up a proficiency level (only on Math or English).

  • 100 merits may be awarded to Cadets of the Month (cadets may only be Cadets of the month once per year) (Commandant)

School administrators may award merit points for activities not explicitly listed in the foregoing section. If any staff member wishes to award in excess of five merits for a single cadet on a single occasion, they must have prior approval from an administrator.



Use of Merits

Cadets may use merit points to make purchases at the Grizzly Exchange (Student Store) and/or to purchase admission to special “merit trips” scheduled throughout the school year. In these circumstances, the corresponding number of merits is also “erased” from the cadet’s total merit points.




NOTE POLICY CHANGE: Merits may not be used to replace required detention time.

Merits are NOT transferable to other cadets, nor are they transferable to subsequent school years. A merit tracking sheet is provided at the end of Chapter 4 of the planner to aid students in tracking merit balances.
Demerits

Demerits may only be assigned by adult staff members of the school. Demerits are earned when cadets make poor choices while on school grounds, going to or from school, or during a school sponsored activity, or while going to or from, a school-sponsored activity.


Demerits of one point are reconciled ”on the spot”:

These demerits are not written in a student’s permanent discipline record, nor do students receive traditional pink demerit slips. Instead, the cadet must choose exactly ONE of the following five consequences after discussion and counseling by the assigning adult. The adult has the discretion to eliminate one or more of the options if those options have proven ineffective in previous offenses with that cadet:



  • 10 push ups

  • 20 four-count jumping jacks

  • A 75-100 word one paragraph reflection on the infraction and the plan to avoid such infractions in the future

  • A 15 minute detention arranged at a time convenient to the teacher that does not conflict with other cadet duties

  • Classroom or campus clean up for 15 minutes


Demerits of two or more points:

These demerits remain on that cadet’s citizenship record for the year and are considered in determining whether a cadet is placed on disciplinary probation, strict disciplinary probation, or is subject to dismissal. Any violation deemed serious enough to earn 10 demerits may lead to an immediate recommendation for suspension or expulsion.


The cadet’s total number of permanent demerits earned in that school year is the determining factor in whether a cadet is considered for placement on disciplinary probation, strict disciplinary probation, or is subject to dismissal.
Demerits must be turned into the demerit collection box within one school day of being issued for processing. A cadet will be informed when he/she is being given a 2-10 point demerit, for what reason, and the cadet will have the opportunity to tell the staff member his/her version of events prior to the issuance of the demerit. Staff members must give the cadet their portion of the demerit immediately upon the infraction, but in no case shall this occur more than one school day after the infraction.

Cadets being assigned 2 ,3, or 4 point demerits for serious uniform infractions will not necessarily be issued a pink demerit half; however, the adult issuing that demerit will make every effort to make a notation in the cadet’s planner.


When a staff member assigns a demerit of two or more points, that staff member will make every effort to record that demerit in the student’s planner so that parents can be aware of the infraction. If a staff member is not able to record the infraction in the planner, that staff member will make an attempt to contact the parent to notify them by telephone or email.
If a student refuses to comply with an adult’s directive to correct a one point “on the spot” demerit, the student will be issued a 2 point demerit (code #24) for insubordination. Depending on a cadet’s demeanor, the issuing adult may also elect to issue a 3 or 4 point demerit (code #25 or #26).
Demerit Printouts – At each progress report and quarter/semester report card on the dates noted in the school calendar, cadets receive a printout of their accumulated demerits. It is the responsibility of cadets to take this printout home and the responsibility of parents to ask cadets for the printout on the days indicated in the school calendar and/or Parent Bulletin.
In addition, each Monday that school is in session, students will have their total number of permanent demerits recorded in their planner on the page where parents sign to indicate they have received the weekly parent bulletin. It is the responsibility of parents to ask their cadets for the planner each Monday so parents can see the total number of permanent demerits their child has accumulated.
Demerit Appeals – If a cadet believes s/he was given a demerit unjustly or in error, s/he must complete a Demerit Appeal Form in its entirety and turn it in to the Dean of Students’ mailbox by the end of the school day (generally Wednesday) that those demerits that appear on the detention list. No late appeals will be accepted. The Demerit Appeal Form requires cadets to state the reason(s) they believe the demerit should be removed and have the adult who issued the demerit certify that the cadet has discussed the demerit with the adult who initially issued the demerit. Copies of Demerit Appeal Forms are maintained in each LOC classroom. The Demerit Appeal Form will be reviewed by the Dean of Students, who may meet with or gather more information from the cadet and the adult who issued the demerit, and the decision of the Dean regarding the appeal will be communicated on the posted detention list. The TAC Team will receive and file the completed Demerit Appeal Form in the cadet’s company citizenship file. See the Appendix for a copy of this form
List of Demerits and Demerit Codes

(Demerit Codes are numbered from 1 to 100)


Minor Infractions – One (1) point demerits

  1. failure to return a requested document by the deadline, including absence excuse from parent

  2. tardy to class or formation (A cadet is tardy to class if they are not standing in their assigned place in line ready to enter the classroom by the ringing of the first tone of the tardy bell. A cadet is tardy to formation if they are not standing in their assigned place in formation by the ringing of the first tone of the tardy bell)

  3. talking in class or formation without permission

  4. minor uniform/appearance violations or violation of relaxed dress policies (cadets may lose relaxed dress privileges for the remainder of the school year at the discretion of the Dean of Students)

  5. general class misconduct (receiving 3 or more warnings in middle school classrooms)

  6. littering or leaving an eating area in disorder

  7. sleeping in class

  8. failure to follow directions or arguing disrespectfully with an adult

  9. lack of preparation for class (materials, missing homework, etc)

  10. out of class w/o a completely filled out hall pass

  11. textbook not covered

  12. chewing gum at any time on campus or at a school event (this includes chewing objects, or giving the appearance of chewing gum or other objects)

  13. eating food/candy in formation or a school building without permission

  14. abandonment of property OR failure to check company message bulletin board

  15. spitting (in a place other than a garbage can)

  16. inattention in class

  17. failure to show military courtesy

  18. minor violation of rules/policies in the Cadet/Parent handbook

  19. possession and/or use of a cell phone, or other electronic device outside of authorized use, including headphones (the device is subject to confiscation and will be returned only to a parent/guardian)

  20. this list is not exhaustive and depending on the offense, a cadet may receive demerits for misconduct not specified above


Moderately Serious Offenses – Two (2), Three (3) or Four (4) point demerits, at the discretion of the Dean of Students

  1. inappropriate language or obscene gestures – 2 pts (Note for demerit codes 21-26: offensive language includes such as calling someone “gay” or “retarded” or racist comments)

  2. inappropriate language or obscene gestures – 3 pts

  3. inappropriate language or obscene gestures – 4 pts

  4. insubordination or disrespect toward others, including written, physical, verbal, or electronic (this includes not following directions a second time for the same offense, such as chewing gum in the same teacher’s class after a previous warning) – 2 pts

  5. insubordination or disrespect toward others, including written, physical, verbal, or electronic – 3 pts

  6. insubordination or disrespect toward others, including written, physical, verbal, or electronic – 4 pts

  7. not having school planner – 2 pts

  8. withholding the truth – 3 pts

  9. withholding the truth – 4 pts

  10. neglect of duty –2 pts (to include failure to attend an after school interscholastic team practice without prior communication with the coach)

  11. neglect of duty – 3 pts

  12. selling items for personal profit on campus without permission – 4 pts

  13. copying another person’s homework or in-class assignment other than a quiz or test – 2 pts

  14. copying another person’s homework or in-class assignment other than a quiz or test – 3 pts

  15. copying another person’s homework or in-class assignment other than a quiz or test – 4 pts

  16. improper care of school property – 2 pts

  17. improper care of school property – 3 pts

  18. improper care of school property – 4 pts

  19. out of bounds, including exiting and entering through an unauthorized door or gate – 2 pts

  20. disrespect to a guest teacher – 4 pts

  21. failure to attend academic support or detention – 4 pts

  22. extreme uniform violation (including defacing any OMI headgear) – 2 pts

  23. extreme uniform violation – 3 pts

  24. extreme uniform violation, including improper wear of uniform off campus – 4 pts

  25. horseplay, including not keeping hands to oneself – 2 pts

  26. horseplay, including not keeping hands to oneself – 3 pts

  27. horseplay, including not keeping hands to oneself – 4 pts

  28. public displays of affection – 2 pts

  29. public displays of affection – 3 pts

  30. public displays of affection – 4 pts

  31. failure/refusal to render appropriate honors to the nation – 2 pts

  32. failure/refusal to render appropriate honors to the nation – 3 pts

  33. failure/refusal to render appropriate honors to the nation – 4 pts

  34. inappropriate conduct during formations, ceremonies, assemblies, or Pass in Reviews – 2 pts

  35. inappropriate conduct during formations, ceremonies, assemblies, or Pass in Reviews – 3 pts

  36. inappropriate conduct during formations, ceremonies, assemblies, or Pass in Reviews – 4 pts

  37. this list is not exhaustive and depending on the offense, a cadet may receive demerits for misconduct not specified above or for the second offense of a documented one point demerit (other demerit of 2 pts)

  38. third offense of a documented one point demerit or other demerit of 3 pts

  39. fourth offense of a documented one point demerit or other demerit of 4 pts


SERIOUS OFFENSES – Five (5) point demerits

Most of these could be grounds for suspension/expulsion in addition to the demerits – ALL SUCH OFFENSES REQUIRE THE WITNESSING ADULT/STUDENT TO COMPLETE AND FILE AN INCIDENT REPORT

  1. lying

  2. cheating on quizzes or tests

  3. plagiarism

  4. significant classroom disruption after repeated warnings or significant disruption at an off-campus school activity

  5. willful disobedience or defiance

  6. ditching – not being in assigned classroom but being somewhere else on campus without permission

  7. violation of the Computer Network Use Agreement or recording activities on campus without administrative approval

  8. minor physical altercation and/or minor act of aggression, including “flipping” of backpacks

  9. forgery (first offense)

  10. disobedience during a fire drill or other emergency drill

  11. gambling

  12. possession of permanent marker/spray paint

  13. play fighting, including water fights and food fights

  14. cheering on a fight

  15. being a witness to an act of bullying, harassment, or other serious misconduct and not reporting it to an adult

  16. this list is not exhaustive and depending on the offense, a cadet may receive demerits for misconduct not specified above


VERY SERIOUS OFFENSES – Ten (10) point demerits

Any of these could be grounds for suspension/expulsion in addition to the demerits – ALL SUCH OFFENSES REQUIRE THE WITNESSING ADULT/STUDENT TO COMPLETE AND FILE AN INCIDENT REPORT

  1. theft, robbery, or extortion or possession of stolen articles (or attempted theft or robbery) including possession of a garrison or flex-fit cap with a name lined out or using another person’s identification card to purchase items from Café OMI.

  2. destruction of school or private property, graffiti/tagging

  3. truancy – off campus without permission

  4. fighting or major physical altercation

  5. forgery (second and subsequent offenses)

  6. tampering with the school’s attendance/grading system or merit/demerit system

  7. possession, selling, or otherwise providing any weapon or imitation weapon including laser pens

  8. unlawfully possessing, using, selling or otherwise providing alcohol, intoxicants or controlled or illegal substances, including prescribed medication

  9. delivering, providing or selling items which are claimed to be alcohol, intoxicants or controlled or illegal substances but were not such items

  10. unlawfully possessing, offering, arranging for, or negotiating to sell any drug items or paraphernalia such as pipes, cigars, bongs, or any item with drug innuendo (e.g. lighter or phone with marijuana leaf)

  11. possessing, providing, or using tobacco or any item containing tobacco or nicotine products

  12. arson or possession of an incendiary device, including matches or a lighter

  13. obscenity, including possession or viewing of pornography, vulgar language, racial slurs, behaviors, or gestures, including by electronic means

  14. extreme disruption or defiance (includes recording of inappropriate campus activities for the purpose of posting to the internet)

  15. sexual harassment, harassment or hazing, including by electronic means

  16. hate crimes

  17. assault/battery

  18. gang activity

  19. fraternization (inappropriate relationship between an upper class cadet and a lower class cadet)

  20. cheating on semester exam or exam of similar importance

  21. false fire alarm or tampering with school safety/security system, including fire extinguishers

  22. destruction of, tampering with, or stealing a teacher’s grade book or a teacher’s personal property

  23. bullying, threats, or intimidation of others, including doing so by electronic means

  24. making terrorist threats against school officials or property or both

  25. this list is not exhaustive and depending on the offense, a cadet may receive demerits for misconduct not specified above



DETENTION

Cadets earn 15 minutes of detention for each demerit. Detentions are held on select Saturdays from 0730-1530 as noted in the school calendar. When practical, parents and cadets may receive a Detention Notice in the form of a special “DETENTION ASSIGNED” STAMP in the cadet’s planner not later than Thursday before the assigned detention. Detention lists will be posted on company bulletin boards by the Wednesday prior to scheduled Saturday detention sessions. Posted lists contain student ID numbers but not student names. Students are expected to know their student number so they can properly identify whether they have earned detention. Cadets must check these lists sometime during the day Wednesday.

Two through ten point demerits require detention but those demerits remain on a cadet’s cumulative demerit total. NOTE POLICY CHANGE: Merits may not be used to replace required detention time.

Failure to attend an assigned detention results in an immediate preliminary discipline board hearing.

Cadets tardy to detention receive no credit for the time they are late . Cadets more than 30 minutes late to detention will not be admitted to the detention session and will automatically be referred to a preliminary discipline board hearing.
Beginning with the 2013-2014 school year, there are no longer nay weekly detention sessions.
Generally, detention consists of cadets being required to sit in silence for the duration of the detention period. No talking, sleeping, eating, or drinking is allowed. As appropriate, cadets will receive individual or small group counseling about better conduct choices. Cadets are expected to bring a silent reading book for detention. Failure to follow directions during detention results in detention time being negated.
All cadets must wear their correct/complete PT uniform to detention. Failure to do so results in additional demerits or denial of admission to the detention session
NOTE REGARDING ACCUMULATION OF DEMERITS
It should be noted that sometimes a cadet accumulates permanent demerits so quickly that the following interventions cannot be implemented in a timely manner. OMI will make every effort to comply with the provisions of the aforementioned interventions, but ultimately, parents are responsible for monitoring their child’s demerit total by reviewing the weekly planner notations and/or contacting the TAC Team and/or reviewing citizenship records on the school’s web-based student information service.
CADETS WHO ENTER OMI AT TIMES OTHER THAN THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL
The Dean may determine that a cadet who enrolls in OMI at a time other than the beginning of the academic year is subject to dismissal at a point proportional to their date of enrollment. In other words, if a cadet enrolls at the end of the first semester, the cadet would be subject to dismissal at 20 demerits. Generally, OMI does not accept cadets after the start of the academic year; however, should such an enrollment occur, the cadet and parent will be notified in writing of the proportional number of allowable demerits at the time of enrollment.
ACTIONS LEADING TO DISCIPLINARY PROBATION

(10 DEMERIT LEVEL)

When a cadet accumulates 10 permanent demerit points in an academic year, the school will mail a letter to the address on file detailing the 10 permanent demerits. Parents will be encouraged to contact the TAC team to schedule a meeting with the cadet, the parent, and TAC team to help the cadet improve his/her conduct. During this and all conferences and hearings the cadet will have the opportunity to respond to demerits received. If a cadet accumulates 10 permanent demerits in the first quarter of the school year, that cadet may be subject to a preliminary discipline board hearing.
A written record of the “intervention” for 10 point demerit accumulation shall be recorded in the cadet’s Student Information System file.
(20 DEMERIT LEVEL)
When a cadet accumulates 20 permanent demerit points in an academic year, the cadet and parent will meet with a Cadet Success Team. This team will provide advice and counsel, create a written action plan for the cadet to avoid future demerits, and select from a list of disciplinary probation consequences. A copy of the written Disciplinary Probation plan will also be signed by the parent and student. When a cadet accumulates 20 or more permanent demerits in the first semester, s/he may be subject to a preliminary discipline board hearing.
Consequences from which the Cadet Success Team will select for disciplinary probation and strict disciplinary probation include, but are not limited to the requirement that cadets


  1. complete school service or additional duties (café OMI duty, flag details, campus clean up, etc) (such service does not qualify for awards or decorations.)

  2. be restricted from participating in extra-curricular activities or trips. If a cadet has already paid for such activities, refunds will only be granted at the discretion of the Superintendent. Such payments are also not transferable to another cadet.

  3. be restricted from participation in CAB activities, including dances.

  4. be restricted by coaches or sponsors from trying out for interscholastic sports teams, drama productions, or other activities in which s/he represents the school.

  5. have a daily and/or weekly progress check form.

  6. attend a weekly counseling session with a member of the TAC team.

  7. participate in peer mentoring/counseling sessions as directed.

  8. be demoted in rank

  9. be removed from leadership positions they currently hold.

  10. complete an anger management, conflict mediation, drug or alcohol intervention or similar program

Such probationary terms may be enacted for a period ranging from one quarter to the remainder of the school year. A written record of the “intervention” for 20 point demerit accumulation and assignment to Disciplinary Probation shall be recorded in the cadet’s Student Information System file.


After the probationary period is completed, a cadet regains the privileges lost but is subject to Strict Disciplinary Probation if s/he accumulates additional demerits.

APPROACHING STRICT DISCIPLINARY PROBATION

(25 DEMERIT LEVEL)

When a cadet accumulates 25 or more permanent demerit points in an academic year, the school will mail a letter to the address on file detailing the 25 permanent demerits. Parents will be encouraged to contact the school to schedule a meeting with the cadet, the parent, and TAC team to help the cadet improve his/her conduct. During this and all conferences and hearings the cadet will have the opportunity to respond to demerits received. A written record of the “intervention” for 25 point demerit accumulation shall be recorded in the cadet’s Student Information System file.

STRICT DISCIPLINARY PROBATION


(30 DEMERIT LEVEL)

When a cadet accumulates 30 demerit points in an academic year, the cadet and his/her parent will appear before the Commandant or his designee who will review the 30 permanent demerits, provide advice and counsel, create a written action plan for the cadet to avoid future demerits, and select from a list of strict disciplinary probation consequences. A copy of a written Strict Disciplinary Probation plan will also signed by the parent and cadet. Consequences from which the Commandant will select include those noted above. Note that cadets who reach 30 demerits prior to the start of the third quarter are subject to a preliminary discipline board hearing. A written record of the “intervention” for 30 point demerit accumulation and assignment to Strict Disciplinary Probation shall be recorded in the cadet’s Student Information System file.


PRELIMINARY DISCIPLINE BOARD

(35 DEMERIT LEVEL)


A cadet who accumulates 35 or more demerits in a school year will have a preliminary discipline board hearing to explain the implications of reaching 40 demerits. The hearing will be conducted by the Commandant or Dean of Students and will include the cadet’s TAC Team and/or one or more certificated staff members. Cadet non-commissioned officers and cadet commissioned officers are subject to demotion and/or removal from leadership positions if they accumulate more than 35 demerits. A written record of the “intervention” for 35 point demerit accumulation and Preliminary Discipline Board Hearing shall be recorded in the cadet’s Student Information System file.NOTE: During all disciplinary proceedings the cadet will have the opportunity to respond to demerits received.
DISMISSAL AND THE DISCIPLINE BOARD

(40+ DEMERIT LEVEL)

A cadet who accumulates 40 or more demerits in a school year is subject to immediate recommendation for dismissal. In such cases, a Discipline Board Hearing will be held at which no less than 3 certificated members of the OMI staff shall consider whether to recommend expulsion or, whether an alternative to an expulsion is appropriate. The Discipline Board can recommend continued enrollment at OMI with special provisions such as an extension of Strict Disciplinary Probation, an allowance for a cadet to finish a grading period prior to dismissal, loss of special activities such as prom, 8th grade graduation ceremony, etc., and/or an allowance for additional demerits prior to another Discipline Board hearing. The Discipline Board may also require a cadet to complete school service to receive decrements of demerits or may require attendance at specified workshops or counseling sessions. Cadets who entered OMI at a time other than the start of the academic year may be subject to a Discipline Board hearing at less than 40 demerits as determined upon initial enrollment.
The members of the Discipline Board may considers alternatives to suspension or expulsion, including behavior contracts, Summer Camp, Saturday School, on-campus suspension, campus clean up duties, and/or community service.
Special Considerations for Seniors: In the case of seniors, the Discipline Board is required to seriously consider alternatives to expulsion. Such alternatives can include revocation of senior privileges such as first in the lunch line, etc. It can also include loss of participation in special events such as senior swim night, prom, grad night, and the senior reception and graduation ceremonies.
Technology
At OMI, we believe our challenge is to prepare students for a rapidly changing, information centered world.  We want our students to be motivated to continue life-long learning, to have access to new knowledge and to work cooperatively with others. By themselves, even the most sophisticated technologies cannot improve learning or thinking.  Rather, educators, aided by technology, can create learning environments that support higher order thinking and constructive learning.

The teachers at OMI are planning many opportunities for students to use technology as integrated parts of the regular curriculum.  The Oakland Military Institute College Preparatory Academy is providing teachers with professional development in technology integration.  Our school strives to become a 21st century model of best practices for enhancing student achievement.


OMI strives to make students proficient at using technology to enhance learning. Currently, our technology use includes standard computer productivity software tools (word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software) and to access the information resources of the internet. Additional uses include access to an immense store of multimedia resources and original source documents, available to both teachers for classroom use and students for their own use. Specialized instructional programs and on-line courses and resources are also used.

Extra and Co-Curricular Opportunities
OMI understands the value of Extra and Co-Curricular activities for students. These activities help with the personal growth of students, provide opportunities for students to build community with each other and to make important connections with/contribution to the larger community. By participating in these activities, students are expanding their personal growth through making important connections with others and contributing to the larger community. The development and exploration of a variety of extra-curricular interests serves to cultivate the students’ life long learning skills such as citizenship, cooperation and conflict resolution. OMI offers a range of clubs, evening social events, interscholastic sports, and intramural sports, supervised by teachers and parent volunteers. Driven by student interest, these activities may change from year to year. OMI is proud that a school the size of OMI can provide a very appropriate range of Extra and Co-Curricular activities.

Instructional Methods – How Learning Best Occurs
OMI works in a culture of data-driven assessments and OMI’s instructional methods include a variety of approaches that are research based and consistent with the core values of OMI. Teachers use a variety of instructional methods to most effectively assist students at all levels in mastering the curriculum. These include teacher lecture, cooperative learning, role play, integration of the arts, hands-on activities and science labs, board work in math classrooms, writing across the curriculum, oral speaking opportunities, individual instruction, informal assessments, graphic organizers, summarizing and note taking, to name just a few. There is an increased use of such methods as problem-based learning (placing students in the active role of solving problems), multiple entry points (proposing student exploration of a topic through a number of avenues such as narration, foundational and experimental), compacting (doing pre-assessments and students who know the material are able to move on), and complex instruction (using challenging materials, open ended tasks and small instructional groups.) Teachers’ instruction is also supported by an electronic assessment resource system (Online Assessment Reporting System – OARS) that provides teachers with current and specific information about student achievement for individual students as well as for groups of students. Quality instructional methods such as these have the proven ability to be effective with a wide range of students, including those who are currently performing below grade level, are English language learners or are students with special needs.
Instruction strives to be both engaging and multi-faceted. Increasingly, instructional methods are determined by the data driven needs of individual students. This is important for all students but is especially important for English Learners (“EL”) and special needs students. Teachers use a range of instructional methods to differentiate instruction.
Teachers supplement classroom study with field trips, web-based topical seminars and independent study options. A wide range of after-school clubs and intramural sports, supervised by teachers and parent volunteers, also provide enriching educational, recreational and social opportunities for students.
Consistent with the intent of Congress in adopting the IDEIA, special needs students are mainstreamed to the extent possible (Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE)), under the oversight of the Special Education staff and consistent with the IEP developed for each student. Resource specialist(s) or other special education staff/therapists work directly with these students. Teachers and team members meet with parents and the Special Education Director to develop annual IEP or 504 goals. The research base for OMI’s teaching and learning can be traced to the following resources:

How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning Edited by John D. Bransford, Ann L. Brown, and Rodney R. Cocking, with additional material from the Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice ­ Editors: M. Suzanne Donovan, John D. Bransford, and James W. Pellegrino Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education and the National Research Council, Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2000

Classroom Instruction That Works: Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement
Robert J. Marzano, Debra J. Pickering, and Jane E. Pollock

Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education
James Banks and Cherry A. McGee Banks, editors

Diversity Within Unity: Essential Principles for Teaching and Learning in a Multicultural Society
James A. Banks, Peter Cookson, Geneva Gay, Willis D. Hawley, Jacqueline Jordan Irvine, Sonia Nieta, Janet Schofield, and Walter Stephan.

Teaching to Change the World
Jeannie Oakes and Martin Lipton

So Each May Learn: Integrating Learning Styles and Multiple Intelligences
Harvey F. Silver, Richard W. Strong, and Matthew J. Perini

Quantum Teaching: Orchestrating Student Success
Bobbi DePorter, Mark Reardon, and Sarah Singer Nourie

The Learner's Way: Brain Based Learning in Action
Anne D. Forester and Margaret Reinhard

Qualities of Effective Teachers   James H. Stronge

What Works In the Classroom

by Robert J. Marzano, Barbara B. Gaddy, and Ceri Dean, 2000.  A summary of the long-awaited report on effective practices linked to academic achievement from Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL).  



Community-Based and Service-Based Learning
OMI believes in the development of the civic and ethical dimensions within each student. OMI’s community service requirement engages students in public service, inspiring responsibility and personal growth and motivating students to embrace issues of justice and civic responsibility. OMI is currently recognized by the Jefferson Awards as a model service learning school.
OMI also believes in the proven benefits of service learning. Consistent with the concepts espoused by the National Service-Learning Partnership, OMI believes service-learning is a teaching method that engages young people in solving problems within their schools and communities as part of their academic studies or other types of intentional learning activity. OMI also believes service-learning helps students to master important curriculum content by supporting their making meaningful connections between what they are studying and its many applications. Finally, OMI believes service-learning also helps young people develop a range of service skills, from acts of kindness and caring, to community stewardship, to civic action.
Counseling – Academic and College
OMI is a college preparatory school. The expectation is that virtually all students will be seeking an academic education consistent with the desire to attend college. Based on the data from OMI’s first two graduating classes, a very high percentage of graduates attend college, with the largest percentage of these attending four year public and private universities, including the most selective public and private universities. The curriculum of OMI is structured to provide the academic depth and rigor needed to gain entry and succeed in college. In addition, the counseling function at OMI includes substantial assistance to students and their families regarding college admission. OMI has a most knowledgeable and capable counselor on staff and the relevant resources available, such as the OMI College Handbook. Students and their families are referred to CaliforniaCollege.edu as an additional college planning resource. The counselor provides all students and their families with assistance with college planning. OMI benefits students in this “college going” arena in many ways, including:


  • Providing a small appropriate high school setting, and a 7 year program that allows the counselor to develop a deeper and more personalized relationship with students and their families

  • The personalized attention possible in the small school setting and a seven year program is additionally important to better serve EL and students with disabilities

  • Appropriate course selection (9-12) based on student interest, a-g readiness, and assessment data.

  • Support faculty with expert knowledge regarding college readiness, a-g, SAT and SAT II

  • College admissions test preparation & registration

  • Guidance through the college admissions process

  • Financial aid information & application assistance

  • A parent education program starting in the 6th grade that helps all families begin planning for college

  • College information nights for students and parents, including campus visits from college admissions & financial aid professionals

  • The Counselor ensures all students take the PSAT in 11th grade, building readiness for the SAT.

  • Counselors monitor and support students in the CAHSEE process, including providing access to tutoring and supplemental instruction


Counseling – Personal and Social
In addition to college academic counseling, OMI assists all students in the areas of personal and social development. TAC Teams may provide preventative and developmental counseling to assist students with the life skills necessary to deal with academic, personal and social challenges. TAC Teams and the counselor monitor and provide personal/social interventions as necessary. TAC Teams and the counseling staff also refer students to alcohol and drug prevention programs. The overall objective is to help students become the productive, well-adjusted adults of tomorrow.
At Risk Students/Students who are Academically Low Achieving
At OMI all students access the core curriculum. OMI evaluates the basic literacy and mathematics each student when they enter OMI, to assess academic strengths and deficiencies a Study Skills and Academic Literacy course has been offered in the summer in past years and may continue to be used. Study Skills and Academic Literacy skills are also inculcated into the LOC courses. Students who enter OMI academically low achieving receive support services such as after school tutoring and teacher assistance during free time. In addition, a variety of intervention strategies are used, including


  • requiring students to use a schoolwide planner

  • Academic Support classes

  • Cadet Success Team meetings

  • Faculty mentors

  • Daily progress checks

  • Common formative assessments and expectations

  • Staff conferences to review student progress

  • Progress reports to parents

  • A staff commitment to provide assistance to students

  • After school tutoring

  • Teacher assistance

  • Counseling/parent meetings

  • Formal SSTs held to determine need for formal assessment for Special Education

  • Special education classes provide academic support and learning strategies

  • Special education/general education collaboration for instruction and assignments


Cadet Study Team (CST)
OMI teachers or teams of teachers identify a student in need of academic assistance at any time. In addition, the Director of Instruction monitors progress and insures periodic reviews for all students during progress reporting times (e.g., every three weeks and at end of grading periods).
OMI is committed to working with students who are achieving below grade level to help them perform at expected levels.
OMI uses a system commonly known as a Student Study Team (“SST”), (which at OMI is known as a CST) that uses a systematic problem solving approach to assist students with concerns that are interfering with success. The CST clarifies problems and concerns; develops strategies and organizes resources; provides a system for school accountability; and serves to assist and counsel the parent, teacher and student. A CST is a general education function. Many students can benefit from a CST, including but not limited to, those students achieving below or above grade level and students who have experienced emotional trauma, behavioral issues, or language issues.
Anyone who has a concern for a student can refer that student to a CST for consideration. Anyone who is connected with that student can be included in the CST to provide information to share about the

student’s strengths, concerns and strategies that have been used in the past. These people may include, but are not limited to, teachers, parents, counselors, doctors, administration, social workers and law enforcement.After implementation of a CST plan and follow up, if the problem continues, revisions to the plan may be discussed, or if necessary, a referral for special education or Section 504 assessment might be deemed necessary by the CST.
California High School Exit Exam Support
The academic standards in the California High School Exit Exam are low. In Language Arts, the exam measures academic knowledge and skills up to the 10th grade level. In mathematics, the exam measures academic knowledge and skills up to the beginning part of Algebra 1. OMI expects and has achieved a higher passage rate than that of OUSD students attending a comprehensive high school. The student most likely to face difficulty is an EL and/or student with disabilities, who may have difficulty with Language Arts portion of the exam. Consistent with the requirements of AB 347, OMI assists any student who is having difficulty passing the CHASEE through our current array of support services (e.g., counseling, after school tutoring), including “post 12th grade students”. OMI also provides the accommodations, modifications and variations for students with disabilities and EL students.
Students Achieving Above Grade Level
In order to provide effective programs and curriculum for academically high achieving and gifted students, OMI offers a continuum of approaches and options that can meet a wide range of abilities, interests, and learning styles. As discussed in the prior section, “Instructional Methods”, teachers use a range of approaches to differentiate instruction. OMI also offers a small variety of elective courses in the high school, as well as a good breadth of AP courses. Other individualized projects, such as the senior thesis, allow for high achieving students to find challenging opportunities.
OMI currently offers a middle school honor program and is exploring the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program (IBMYP). In addition, a variety of honors and AP courses are offered at the high school level.
English Learners – Equal Opportunity for Success
OMI is committed to high levels of academic success for all students, including English Learners (“EL”). OMI meets all applicable legal requirements for ELs including, but not limited to annual notification to parents, student identification, placement, program options, and EL and core content instruction which are researched based, teacher qualifications and training, re-classification to fluent English proficient status, monitoring and evaluating program effectiveness, and standardized testing requirements. OMI implements policies to assure proper placement, evaluation, and communication regarding EL and the rights of students and parents.
The student population served by OMI has many EL students. OMI serves an EL population similar to that served by the Oakland Unified School District. Although OMI has been successful with EL students, a significant emphasis of the continual improvement/professional development plan is dedicated to improving and expanding our EL strategies. To ensure OMI has qualified staff to serve EL students, OMI seeks in the hiring process staff with the proper training and success with EL students. The experience OMI looks for includes a CLAD or BCLAD certificate, SDAIE training or other appropriate specialized training. OMI also provides training opportunities for staff, such as in EL strategies.
Home Language Survey
OMI administers the home language survey upon a student’s initial enrollment.
California English Language Development Test (“CELDT”) Testing
All students who indicate that their home language is other than English are CELDT tested within thirty days of initial enrollment, if they are entering a California public school for the first time, or have never taken a CELDT test for another reason, and they are tested at least annually thereafter between July 1 and October 31st until re­designated as fluent English proficient.
Reclassification Procedures
Reclassification procedures utilize multiple criteria in determining whether to classify a pupil as proficient in English, including, but not limited to, all of the following:


  • Assessment of language proficiency using an objective assessment instrument including, but not limited to, the CELDT.

  • Participation of the pupil’s classroom teachers and any other certificated staff with direct responsibility for teaching or placement decisions of the pupil to evaluate the pupil’s curriculum mastery.

  • Parental opinion and consultation, achieved through notice to parents or guardians of the language reclassification and placement process and encouragement of the participation of parents or guardians in the school’s reclassification procedure.

  • Comparison of the pupil’s performance in basic skills against an empirically established range of performance levels and basic skills (based upon the performance of English proficient pupils of the same age that demonstrate to others that the pupil is sufficiently proficient in English to participate effectively in a curriculum designed for pupils of the same age whose native language is English).


OMI notifies all parents of its responsibility for CELDT testing and of CELDT results within thirty days of receiving results from publisher. The CELDT is used to fulfill the requirements under the No Child Left Behind Act for annual English proficiency testing.
Providing English Learners full access to a rigorous curriculum is accomplished through a variety of strategies, guided by principles for teaching EL Students. The following information, adapted from the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory, summarizes those principles and strategies:

  • Krashen’s Theory of Comprehensible Input – using nonverbal cues, using graphic organizers, hands-on learning, and cooperative/peer tutoring

  • Swain’s Theory of Comprehensible Output – cooperative learning, study buddies, project-based learning, and one-to-one student/teacher interactions

  • Cummins’ Theories of Academic Language and Cognitively Demanding Communication – higher order thinking questions, modeling thinking language by think alouds, explicit teaching, test and study skills, and high expectations

  • Using the native language to increase comprehensibility

  • Total Physical Response

  • Language Experience (Dictated Stories)

  • Scaffolding and activating prior knowledge

  • The use of realia

  • Word walls in academic classrooms

  • The use of the THIEVES text previewing strategy

  • Use of sentence frames


Overview of Services for Students With Disabilities
OMI is committed to high levels of academic success for all students, including students with disabilities. OMI complies with all applicable State and Federal Laws in serving students with disabilities, including, but not limited to, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (“Section 504”), the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act (“IDEIA”).
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act
OMI recognizes its legal responsibility to ensure that no qualified person with a disability shall, on the basis of disability, be excluded from participation, be denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program of OMI. Any student, who has an objectively identified disability which substantially limits a major life activity including but not limited to learning, is eligible for reasonable accommodation by OMI.
OMI will be responsible for ensuring compliance with Section 504. OMI has a 504 coordinator who has the responsibility for overseeing the 504 process at OMI. A student may be referred by anyone, including a parent/guardian, teacher, other school employees or community agency, for consideration as to whether the student qualifies as a student with a disability under Section 504.
When appropriate, a 504 team is assembled by the Director of Instruction and includes the parent/guardian, the student (where appropriate) and other qualified persons knowledgeable about the student, the meaning of the evaluation data, placement options, and accommodations. The 504 team reviews the student’s existing records; including academic, social and behavioral records, and is responsible for making a determination as to whether an evaluation for 504 services is appropriate. If the student has already been evaluated under the IDEIA but found ineligible for special education instruction or related services under the IDEIA, those evaluations may be used to help determine eligibility under Section 504. The student evaluation is carried out by the 504 team who evaluate the nature of the student’s disability and the impact upon the student’s education. This evaluation includes consideration of any behaviors that interfere with regular participation in the educational program and/or activities. The 504 team may also consider the following information in its evaluation:


  • Tests and other evaluation materials that have been validated for the specific purpose for which they are used and are administered by trained personnel.

  • Tests and other evaluation materials including those tailored to assess specific areas of educational need, and not merely those which are designed to provide a single general intelligent quotient.

  • Tests that are selected and administered to ensure that when they are administered to a student with impaired sensory, manual or speaking skills, the test results accurately reflect the student’s aptitude or achievement level, or whatever factor the test purports to measure, rather than reflecting the student’s impaired sensory, manual or speaking skills.



The final determination of whether the student will or will not be identified as a person with a disability is
made by the 504 team in writing and notice is given in writing to the parent or guardian of the student in
their primary language along with the procedural safeguards available to them. If during the evaluation, the 504 team obtains information indicating possible eligibility of the student for special education per the IDEIA, a referral for assessment under the IDEIA is made by the 504 team.
If the student is found by the 504 team to have a disability under Section 504, the 504 team shall be responsible for determining what, if any, accommodations or services are needed to ensure that the student receives the Free and Appropriate Public Education (“FAPE”), pursuant to Section 104.33 of Title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In developing the 504 Plan, the 504 team shall consider all relevant information utilized during the evaluation of the student, drawing upon a variety of sources, including, but not limited to, assessments conducted by OMI’s professional staff. The 504 Plan shall describe the Section 504 disability and any program accommodations, modifications or services that may be necessary.
All 504 team participants, parents, guardians, teachers and any other participants in the student’s education, including tutors, receive a copy of each student’s 504 Plan. The site administrator will ensure that teachers include 504 Plans with lesson plans for short-term substitutes and that he/she review the 504 Plan with a long-term substitute. A copy of the 504 Plan shall be maintained in the student’s file. The 504 coordinator will ensure that each student’s 504 Plan will be reviewed at least once per year to determine the appropriateness of the Plan, needed modifications to the plan, and continued eligibility.

Services for Students Under the “IDEIA”
OMI currently belongs to the El Dorado County Charter SELPA and is an independent LEA for the purposes of Special Education.
As an independent LEA for purposes of providing special education and related services under the IDEIA pursuant to Education Code § 47641(b), in accordance with Education Code § 47646 and 20 U.S.C. 1413, OMI follows SELPA policies and procedures, and utilizes SELPA forms in seeking out and identifying, assessing, and serving students who may qualify for special education programs and services and for responding to record requests and maintaining the confidentiality of pupil records.


Western Association of Schools and Colleges Accreditation
OMI is accredited through the Western Association of Schools and Colleges receiving in 2007 a six-year accreditation period. OMI’s educational programs are consistent with the tenets of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, including vision, purpose, governance, leadership and resources. OMI’s educational program includes standards-based curriculum, instruction and assessment and accountability. OMI also includes support for student personal and academic growth. OMI’s accreditation by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges ensures the eligibility of OMI’s graduates for enrollment in the University of California.

Section III

Measurable Student Outcomes and

USES OF DATA

The measurable pupil outcomes identified for use by the charter school. ‘Pupil outcomes,’

for purposes of this part, means the extent to which all pupils of the school demonstrate that they have attained the skills, knowledge, and attitudes specified as goals in the school’s educational program.”

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(B)


The method by which pupil progress in meeting those pupil outcomes is to be measured.”

- California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(C).
OMI meets all statewide standards and conducts the pupil state assessments required pursuant to Education Code Section 60605 and 60851 and any other statewide standards authorized in statue or pupil assessments applicable to pupils in noncharter public schools.

Effective January 1, 2013, per Senate Bill No. 1290, this bill would require those pupil outcomes to include outcomes that address increases in pupil academic achievement both schoolwide and for all group of pupils served by the charter school, which this bill would define.



OMI outcomes are aligned with the mission, curriculum, and assessment of the school. The OMI program is designed to help all students achieve a high level of academic success and be prepared for entry in University of California and other selective public and private universities and colleges. Students demonstrate core academic and lifelong learning skills, which have been developed to align with the California State Curriculum Standards. The assessment methods used are those required by state or federal law, those required by external agencies (e.g., College Board) and those created/adopted by OMI.

OMI also measures the progress of specialized populations. Consistent with Federal and state law, OMI reviews/participates in the review of the progress of students with disabilities according to their Individualized Educational Plan or their 504 plan. Also consistent with Federal law, OMI monitors the progress of all EL students. OMI also ensures that any modifications and accommodations required for standardized tests under IDEIA and 504 are implemented.

Some desired pupil outcomes are objectively measurable. For OMI these include acquiring the knowledge specified in the Common Core state standards, passing the California High School Exit Exam, taking and passing AP/CIE exams or community college courses in appropriate subjects, and taking and passing the classes necessary to be eligible for admission to the UC (a-g courses). Our primary long term measurable goal in all four categories is that OMI will compare favorably with top public and private schools in the US.

Progress is also measured by classroom teachers in the traditional manner, including quizzes, essays, projects, performances, portfolios, exhibitions, tests, and exams. Progress is reported on a regular basis to parents and students and report cards each quarter.
MEASURABLE STUDENT OUTCOMES AND GOALS ALIGNED TO STATE PRIORITIES

OMI’s student outcomes are designed to align with the Charter School’s mission, curriculum, and assessment, the Common Core State Standards for Literacy and Mathematics, and the California State Standards for courses offered at OMI, as well as the 8 state priorities called for in Local Control and Accountability Plans.

OMI has established the following goals and measures of student achievement to ensure that we meet our mission and that we meet federal and state goals for all subgroups attending our school. OMI will continue to examine and refine its student and school outcomes over time to reflect the Charter School’s mission and any changes to state or federal requirements.

STATE PRIORITY #1: The degree to which teachers are appropriately assigned and fully credentialed, and every pupil has sufficient access to standards-aligned instructional materials, and school facilities are maintained in good repair.

OMI PRIORITY #1: OMI will ensure that 100% of teachers are appropriately assigned and fully credentialed, and every pupil has access to standards-aligned instructional materials, and school facilities are maintained in good repair.

ACTIONS TO ADDRESS PRIORITY #1:


  • No teacher will be hired without full credentials. In the rare case where a teacher requires a short term staff permit, this will not be allowed to persist more than one academic year.

  • No teacher will be assigned to teach a course for which s/he does not possess the proper credentials.

  • All students will have access to standards-aligned instructional materials, both in classrooms and at home.

  • The school facility will be maintained in excellent condition and any needed repairs will be accomplished as soon as practical. No marginally unsafe facilities conditions will be allowed to persist more than one working day, and all unsafe facility conditions will be immediately corrected.

MEASURABLE OUTCOMES FOR PRIORITY #1:

  • 100% of teachers will be fully credentialed for all teaching assignments.

  • 100% of students will have in-school and at-home access to standards-aligned instructional materials.

  • 100% of the school’s facility components will be maintained in good repair.


STATE PRIORITY #2: Implementation of Common Core State Standards, including how EL students will be enables to gain academic content knowledge and English language proficiency.

OMI PRIORITY #2: OMI will implement Common Core State Standards for all students, including English language learners.

ACTIONS TO ADDRESS PRIORITY #2:


  • OMI will adopt curriculum materials aligned with the CCSS as those materials become available.

  • All academic courses will create curriculum guides/maps that align with the CCSS and include specific measures to meet the needs of English learners and all other numerically significant subgroups.

  • Robust professional development will be provided to all teachers on CCSS implementation and strategies to support ELs and all other numerically significant subgroups.

MEASURABLE OUTCOMES FOR PRIORITY #2:

  • By the end of the 2014-2015 school year, every teacher and student will have access to CCSS aligned instructional materials in ELA and Math.

  • As CCSS are adopted in Science and History/Social Science (and other subjects) OMI will ensure teachers and students have access to aligned instructional materials within one academic year.

  • A minimum of 20 hours per school year of CCSS-Aligned professional development will be provided for each OMI teacher.

  • 100% of OMI courses in Math and ELA/ELD will have curriculum guides/maps developed and implemented by the end of the 2014-2015 academic year.

STATE PRIORITY #3: Parental involvement, including efforts to seek parent input for making decisions for schools, and how the school will promote parent participation.

OMI PRIORITY #3: Every parent will be involved in all four of OMI’s pillars for their child and will feel welcome to participate in the governance of the school.

ACTIONS TO ADDRESS PRIORITY #3:



  • OMI will continue its numerous efforts and strategies to involve all parents; in addition, OMI will…

  • Make a greater effort to ensure that all platoons are represented by one or more parents at each PAC meeting and that two-way communication be more robust between the PAC, all parents, and school administration

  • Make a greater effort to ensure that more parents attend the Schoolsite Council meetings

MEASURABLE OUTCOMES FOR PRIORITY #3:

  • At least 20 or 25 platoons will be represented at all PAC meetings.

  • At least 10 parents will attend each SSC meeting.

  • 100% of new parents will participate in the annual new parent day-long orientation program.

STATE PRIORITY #4: Pupil achievement, as measured by all of the following as applicable:

  1. Statewide assessments

  2. API

  3. % of pupils who have successfully completed the A-G requirements

  4. % of ELs who make progress toward EL proficiency as measured by CELDT

  5. EL reclassification rate

  6. % of pupils who have passed an AP Exam with a score of 3 or higher

  7. % of pupils who participate in and demonstrate college preparedness pursuant to the Early Assessment Program (or any subsequent assessment of college readiness)

OMI PRIORITY #4: OMI will strive to ensure that all OMI students, including all students in numerically significant subgroups, achieve academically, as evidenced by

  1. Statewide assessments

  2. API

  3. % of pupils who have successfully completed the A-G requirements

  4. % of ELs who make progress toward EL proficiency as measured by CELDT

  5. EL reclassification rate

  6. % of pupils who have passed an AP Exam with a score of 3 or higher or students who successfully complete a college level course

  7. % of pupils who participate in and demonstrate college preparedness pursuant to the Early Assessment Program (or any subsequent assessment of college readiness)

ACTIONS TO ADDRESS PRIORITY #4:

  • Standards based and aligned curricula in all classes

  • Regular benchmark (interim) assessments (at least three times a year), aligned to the standards, which are analyzed and become the basis for action plans to improve teaching and learning

  • Extensive student support structures, including academic support classes, tutoring, homework help, summer school, summer bridge classes, and Executive Function instruction

  • Extensive faculty professional development, focusing on how to best support ALL students to achieve proficiency

  • College courses on the OMI campus and arranged through OMI

  • SAT/ACT prep courses

  • A college and alumni outreach coordinated plan to support OMI alumni through college graduation and entry into the work force.

MEASURABLE OUTCOMES FOR PRIORITY #4:

  • 70% or more of all students, and 70% of students in all subgroups, will demonstrate proficiency on the CCSS SBAC assessment or its equivalent in ELA, Math, Science, and History/Social Science for those grades tested

  • 70% or more of all students, and 70% of students in all subgroups, will show statistically significant growth on internal interim assessments for each course.

  • The school’s API will be 750 or above.

  • The school will meet its AYP in at least three of the five years of the charter renewal.

  • At least 80% of students (including at least 80% of all numerically significant subgroups) will pass both English and Math on their first CAHSEE attempt and 100% will pass prior to graduation.

  • At least 85% of students (including at least 85% of all numerically significant subgroups) will successfully complete the UC/CSU A-G requirements.

  • At least 85% of OMI’s senior class (including at least 85% of all numerically significant subgroups) each year will be accepted to four year colleges or universities.

  • At least 85% of students will make progress toward EL proficiency as measured by CELDT.

  • 95% of students will be reclassified as English proficient within three years of enrollment at OMI.

  • 95% of students will participate in the EAP.

  • At least 50% of students will be “ready” and at least 75% will be “ready or conditionally ready” for college English and math as measured by the EAP.

  • At least 50% of graduating seniors will have taken and passed at least one AP exam or one community college UC/CSU transferable course and at least 25% of graduating seniors will have taken and passed at least two AP exams or two community college UC/CSU transferable courses prior to graduation.

  • At least 75% of OMI alumni will receive a bachelor’s degree within six years of OMI graduation.

______________________________________________________________________________________

STATE PRIORITY #5: Pupil engagement, as measured by all of the following, as applicable:



  1. School attendance rates.

  2. Chronic absenteeism rates.

  3. Middle school dropout rates.

  4. High school dropout rates.

  5. High school graduation rates.

OMI PRIORITY #5: OMI’s students will be engaged fully in the learning process, as evidenced by:

  1. Excellent school attendance rates.

  2. Low chronic absenteeism rates.

  3. Very low middle school dropout rates.

  4. Very low high school dropout rates.

  5. Extremely high high school graduation rates.

ACTIONS TO ADDRESS PRIORITY #5:

  • Attendance incentives.

  • Effective SART/SARB protocols.

  • Dropout prevention and recovery efforts.

  • Graduation persistence efforts.

MEASURABLE OUTCOMES FOR PRIORITY #5:

  • OMI’s average daily attendance rate will exceed 95%.

  • The number of students with more than three unexecused absences in a semester will equal less than 5% of the student body.

  • There will be zero dropouts from OMI.

  • 100% of OMI students who start their senior year at OMI will receive a diploma not later than the summer following their senior year.

STATE PRIORITY #6: School climate, as measured by all of the following as applicable:

  1. Pupil suspension rates.

  2. Pupil expulsion rates.

  3. Other local measures, including surveys of pupils, parents, and teachers on the sense of safety and school connectedness.

OMI PRIORITY #6: School climate will be exceptionally strong, as measured by all of the following as applicable:

  1. Low Pupil suspension rates.

  2. Extremely low Pupil expulsion rates.

  3. Surveys of pupils, parents, and teachers on the sense of safety and school connectedness.

ACTIONS TO ADDRESS PRIORITY #6:

  • Implementation of enhanced effective entrance camp strategies to help students identify school culture expectations.

  • Implementation of enhanced strategies as alternatives to suspension and expulsion.

  • Implementation of the school’s master facility plan, which includes safety and security enhancements, including the installation of security cameras campuswide.

  • Continuation of robust student mental and social health services.

MEASURABLE OUTCOMES FOR PRIORITY #6:

  • Suspension and expulsion rates less than half of the OUSD numbers.

  • Student, staff, and parent surveys indicate 90% or more of all stakeholders feel the school is a physically and emotionally safe environment.

  • At least 90% of students and parents will report satisfaction with the school’s academic program on annual surveys.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

STATE PRIORITY #7: The extent to which pupils have access to, and are enrolled in a broad course of study, including programs and services developed and provided to unduplicated students (classified as EL, FRPM-eligible, or foster youth) and students with exceptional needs.

OMI PRIORITY #7: OMI will provide all students its existing broad course of study which includes English, social sciences, languages other than English, physical education, character education, science, mathematics, and visual and performing arts.

ACTIONS TO ADDRESS PRIORITY #7: OMI will continue to provide its existing robust course of study.


_____________________________________________________________________________________

STATE PRIORITY #8: Pupil outcomes, if available, in the subject areas described above in #7.

OMI PRIORITY #8: OMI’s four pillars of academics, leadership, citizenship, and athletics will continue to be strengthened and student outcomes in each pillar measured regularly.

ACTIONS TO ADDRESS PRIORITY #8:



  • Continue to provide a robust leadership development program through the California Cadet Corps curriculum and membership.

  • Continue to provide a robust athletic program through intramurals, interscholastic sports, and preparation for the Fitnessgram.

  • Continue to provide a robust citizenship program through the school’s merit /demerit system, school and community service opportunities, and quality character education curricula.

MEASURABLE OUTCOMES FOR PRIORITY #8:

  • OMI will attain a Superior rating on each Annual General Inspection of the California Cadet Corps.

  • OMI will have a 75% or greater pass rate on California Cadet Corps online promotion tests.

  • OMI will have 90% of its students meet 5 or 6 of the six Healthy Fitness Zones within the Fitnessgram.

  • OMI’s students will perform a minimum of 10,000 school service hours annually.

  • OMI’s students will perform a minimum of 10,000 community service hours annually.

  • At least 90% of student annually will respond “agree” or “strongly agree” on the annual survey question “OMI is preparing me to be a leader of character.”

  • At least 90% of students and parents will report satisfaction with the school’s athletic program each year.

  • At least 90% of students and parents will report satisfaction with the school’s leadership development program each year.

  • At least 70% of students and parents will report satisfaction with the school’s citizenship program each year.

OMI PRIORITY #9: OMI will be fiscally sound and well governed.

ACTIONS TO ADDRESS PRIORITY #9:



  • Maintain a balanced budget.

  • Maintain a reserve for economic uncertainty of at least $2,000,000

  • Update the school’s governing board bylaws as appropriate.

  • Continue quality board oversight of school metrics.

  • Continue focus on 100% compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

  • Implement the adopted Master Facility Plan.

MEASURABLE OUTCOMES FOR PRIORITY #9:

  • Maintain a balanced budget each year of the charter renewal.

  • Maintain a reserve for economic uncertainty of at least $2,000,000 by the end of the charter renewal period.

  • Update the school’s governing board bylaws at least once during the term of the charter.

  • Publication of an annual report on the metric outlined in the above priorities.

  • Zero litigation.

  • Implementation of a majority of the adopted Master Facility Plan by the end of the charter renewal term.

By September 1, 2015 OMI shall also provide updated Measurable Pupil Outcomes that align with goals and actions established pursuant to the Local Control Accountability Plan requirements, based on the template provided by the State Board of Education.

Use and Reporting of Data

Assessments are used to inform OMI regarding the mastery of content by students, the effectiveness of instruction and when additional and/or different instruction is needed. This use of assessment data occurs on four levels. The first level is to assist OMI to identify the progress of individual students, providing the opportunity to identify individual students who are making appropriate progress, those who are not, and those who are excelling. Using this information, teachers and the counseling staff can provide specific assistance to each student as needed. This also includes counseling students on accelerated/enriched learning opportunities. Students needing extra assistance and/or time also have several resources available to them. Teachers offer “drop in” and scheduled assistance. OMI offers a tutorial program, staffed by qualified teachers, sometimes enhanced by college students. Students seeking more rigorous academic work will be encouraged to accelerate to a higher level course offered by OMI and may also be encouraged to take courses at local universities.

The second level for the use of assessment data is to identify situations during the school year where groups of students are not meeting expectations in a specific class, course or subject area. Teachers and/or departments use assessment data to identify these situations and determine what steps are needed to provide additional instruction or re-teach to address the shortcomings.

The third level for the use of assessment data is to evaluate and continually improve the educational program through a review of the curriculum, instructional, and evaluation practices. For example, assessment results that show a broad lack of mastery in a specific topic or skill trigger an evaluation by teachers, a department or the entire school of what is taught, what resources are available to teach it, how it is being taught, and the most appropriate manner to re-teach that specific content area.

Finally, as summarized in the Key Summative Outcome Goals chart, assessments provide an overview of the success of OMI’s academic program as a whole. As a college preparatory school, this includes information such as average GPA, the percentage of students receiving acceptance to their college of choice, which college students are attending, and the average SAT, SAT 2, and AP scores of graduates. It may also include information from surveys of OMI graduates. In-depth reviews of all aspects of the academic program including academic achievement on standardized tests will occur annually.

Section IV

Governance STRUCTURE

The governance structure of the school, including, but not limited to, the process to be followed by the school to ensure parental involvement.”

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(D)


Non-Profit Public Benefit Corporation
OMI has constituted itself as a California non-profit public benefit corporation pursuant to California law and has had its 501(c)(3) status recognized by the Internal Revenue Service. OMI is governed pursuant to its adopted Bylaws, as subsequently amended from time to time, which are consistent with this Charter.
OMI operates autonomously from the chartering agency, with the exception of the supervisory oversight as required by statute and other contracted services as negotiated between the chartering agency and OMI. Pursuant to California Education Code § 47604(c), the chartering agency will not be liable for the debts and obligations of OMI, or for claims arising from the performance of acts, errors, or omissions by OMI as long as the chartering agency has complied with all oversight responsibilities required by law.
Assurances
OMI will comply with the District policy related to charter schools to the extent is aligns with and does not exceed the law applicable to charter schools, as it may be changed from time to time, as long as the charter school has been given reasonable written notice of the policy change, and the policy change is in accordance with applicable law.
OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE shall comply with federal and state laws, nonprofit integrity standards and OUSD’s Charter School policies and regulations regarding ethics and conflicts of interest. 
OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE will be solely responsible for the debts and obligations of the charter school.

Managerial Expertise/Executive Team
OMI benefits from the mature educational, administrative, and fiscal systems and procedures and experienced staff already in place. OMI is currently under the leadership of OMI Superintendent Mark Ryan; Director of Instruction Dara Northcroft; and Commandant of Cadets Major Francisco Flores;.


  • Superintendent

LTC (CA) Mark Ryan has served as the Assistant Executive Officer of the California Cadet Corps since 2005 and is currently the Superintendent at the Oakland Military Institute College Preparatory Academy and 4th Brigade Advisor. He concurrently serves as the Commander, Youth Programs Support Group, California State Military Reserve.


Commissioned as a 2LT in the California Cadet Corps in 1984, LTC Ryan is a former cadet, having attained the rank of Cadet Colonel as commander of the 8th Brigade. He grew up in 7th Brigade schools, including John Burroughs Junior High School and went on to be an assistant commandant in both the 7th and 8th brigades. From 1985-1989, he served on the state staff as Support Officer, responsible for administration, personnel, operations, supply, and logistics for the program statewide. LTC Ryan has also served as a 10th Brigade Advisor since 1985. LTC Ryan was commissioned as a LTC in the California State Military Reserve in 2007.
During his adult career, LTC Ryan has held the position of commandant at Rio Linda High School, Don Julio Jr. High School, Los Angeles Academy Middle School, and San Gorgonio High School. He has served as both the 11th Brigade Advisor and 4th Brigade Advisor and has spearheaded the Cadet Corps’ efforts at updating and revamping the Cadet Regulations and Cadet Corps Curriculum. His recent accomplishments include revision and creation of more than 30 regulations and several thousand pages of cadet curriculum materials. He spearheaded the effort to establish State Curriculum Standards for the California Cadet Corps and secure approval of those standards from both the State Military Department and Department of Education.
LTC Ryan holds California Administrative, Designated, and Multiple Subject credentials from the Commission on Teacher Credentialing, an earned doctorate from the University of Southern California in Curriculum and Instruction, a Master of Science Degree in Educational Administration, and a Bachelors Degree in Liberal Arts. He has been an elementary school teacher and administrator, and a high school vice principal and principal, as well as a program specialist and coach for math and science teachers at the middle school level.
LTC Ryan’s military awards include the California Medal of Merit, the Order of California, the Distinguished Service Medal with gold cluster, the Cadet Corps Commendation Medal with gold cluster, the Cadet Corps Achievement Medal with gold cluster, the Cadet Corps Service Medal with gold redwood cluster, the State Staff Service Ribbon with gold cluster, Cadet Corps Special Service Ribbon with gold cluster, and Summer Training Service Ribbon with silver star device. LTC Ryan’s civilian honors include the Los Angeles Unified School District “STAR” award, the St. Matthias Virtus Veritas Award, a Cardinal’s Award from the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, and honors from the San Bernardino City Unified School District.



  • Director of Instruction

Dara Northcroft earned her B.A. from University of California, Berkeley in Psychology and her M.S. in Educational Leadership from California State University, East Bay. She also holds a teaching and an administrative credential. Dara has been the Director of Instruction at Oakland Military Institute College Preparatory Academy since the 2004 school year. While at OMI, she was instrumental in helping the school grow to include a full compliment of grades, 6-12. Prior to working at OMI, Dara was the principal at St. Paul of the Shipwreck, a Catholic School in the Bay View-Hunters Point district of San Francisco. Her work there resulted in higher academic expectations, clearer communication between the school and the parents, and an improved sense of pride and collaboration in the school community. Dara began her career in education as a teacher and vice principal at St. Paschal Baylon Catholic School in Oakland, CA and attributes her years at that school to further igniting her love of working with children and for encouraging her to become a school leader.




  • Commandant of Cadets

Major Francisco Flores holds a bachelors degree and multiple subject credential from the State of California, as well as an Administrative Services Credential. He is a member of the California National Guard, having served proudly as both an enlisted soldier and officer for more than 25 years. He is the recipient of numerous state and national military awards and decorations, and is an experienced school teacher and administrator in California..




Board of Directors
The current OMI Board consists of twelve voting members. Each board member brings significant experience and a strong commitment to OMI.
The current members of the Board are:
Chairman Clinton Reilly, President and CEO of Clinton Reilly Holdings

Vice Chairman Baxter Rice, Consultant

Major General David S. Baldwin, The Adjutant General and Director, California Military Department

Brigadier General James Gabrielli, Commander, Youth and Community Programs Task Force, California National Guard

Mary Sue Allen, Vice President for Human Resources, United Parcel Service

The Honorable Joseph Sweeney, Civilian Aide to the Secretary of the Army for Northern California

David Clisham, Attorney at Law

Buzz Breedlove, Retired School Administrator, and Consultant

Steven Samuels, Civil Engineer

Joseph Wire, CFO, Golden Gate Bridge Authority

Bill Bowen, Retired business leader, author

Sedrick Tydus, Retied Bank President, Independent Consultant


The Board has a strong record of leadership, stability, and fiscal responsibility. The academic success, strong and stable management, seven successive years of unqualified audits, and healthy fiscal reserves, are reflective of the leadership that will also guide the next five years of OMI. The Board will be fully responsible for the operation and fiscal affairs of OMI including but not limited to:


  1. Recruiting, hiring, and evaluating the Superintendent;

  2. Financial and operational management of OMI;

  3. Adoption of OMI’s annual financial budget;

  4. Overseeing receipt of operating funds by the school in accordance with the terms and procedures of the Charter Schools Act;

  5. Overseeing solicitation and receipt of grants and donations to OMI;

  6. Developing and implementing Personnel policies and procedures and employee disciplinary matters;

  7. Approval of hiring and dismissal recommendations made by the Superintendent;

  8. Approval of contracts with outside entities or persons;

  1. Financial audit oversight;

  2. Relations with the chartering entity;

  3. All matters related to charter approval, amendment, or revocation; and

  4. Defend OMI from any adverse legal actions.


The Board may initiate and carry on any program or activity, or otherwise act in any manner which is neither in conflict with, nor inconsistent with, nor preempted by, any law and which is not in conflict with the purposes for which charter schools are established. The Board may execute any powers delegated to it by law and will discharge any duty imposed by law upon it and may delegate to any employee any of those duties. The Board, however, retains ultimate responsibility over the performance of those powers or duties so delegated. The Board will defend OMI from any adverse claims or legal actions. The Board will address program concerns regarding the operation and improvement of OMI. The Board is the final policy-making authority for OMI. The Board will recommend programs, policies, and schedules designed to meet the evolving educational needs of OMI’s students, parents, and teachers.All Board meetings are held in accordance with the Brown Act and are open to the public and each agenda includes time for community input with regard to OMI. However, the Board reserves the right to meet in closed session and discuss items for which closed sessions are permitted under the Brown Act. Decisions made in closed session will be reported in open session at the conclusion of the closed session. The board meetings are held in compliance with the Bylaws. A Board roster and meeting schedule is attached as Appendix XIV.
OMI Superintendent
The Superintendent is the Chief Executive Officer of OMI. The Superintendent reports to the Board, and is responsible for providing overall leadership and direction to the organization in the fulfillment of the Board policies and priorities. The Superintendent promotes the vision of the Board and is the Board’s chief advisor, overseeing the strategic and operational plans of OMI.
The Superintendent has overall day-to-day management responsibilities of the school, determined by the Board as outlined in the Bylaws, job specification and the job specific employment contract. The Superintendent ensures the school operates in fulfillment of the mission as spelled out in the charter and in compliance with charter school law, OMI Bylaws and applicable education law. The Superintendent operates with the Board and its committees to ensure the school makes sound strategic decisions, based on the effective use of student, programmatic and fiscal data. The Superintendent ensures that the school maintains a focus on student achievement. The Superintendent serves as a spokesperson for OMI to further the school’s prominence within the local, state and national education and charter school communities.
Specifically, the responsibilities of the Superintendent, or his designee, include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Oversee the strategic and operational plans of OMI.

  • Oversee the day-to-day management of OMI.

  • Develop Board meeting agenda in conjunction with the Board President in compliance with the Brown Act.

  • Supervise and evaluate the administrative team.

  • Propose policies for adoption by the Board.

  • Provide comments and recommendations regarding policies presented by others to the Board.

  • Communicate with legal counsel and any outside consultants.

  • Stay abreast of education laws and regulations.

  • Oversee all purchasing, pay warrants, requisitions and other expenditures.

  • Participate in the dispute resolution procedure and the complaint procedure when necessary.

  • Establish and execute enrollment procedures.

  • Oversee all necessary financial reports as required for proper ADA reporting.

  • Develop and administer the budget in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

  • Present financial reports to the Board.

  • Supervise student disciplinary matters when necessary.

  • Attend all Board meetings.

  • Establish procedures designed to carry out Board policies.

  • Oversee all responsibilities, obligations, and duties not assigned to the Board.


The Board and the Superintendent will work together to set annual goals. The Board evaluates the Superintendent’s performance at least annually.
Business Manager
The Business Manager is the Chief Financial Officer of OMI. The Business Manager reports to the Superintendent, and is responsible for providing management of budgeting, financial operations, and personnel. The primary objective of the Business Manager is to work with Administration to ensure that OMI is operating in a fiscally and administratively responsible manner that is consistent with the school’s mission. The essential duties and responsibilities of this position include, but are not limited to: the maintenance of appropriate fiscal controls, payroll, budget and budget oversight, financial, tax preparation, accounts payable, personnel and business operations.
Director of Instruction
The Director of Instruction supervises the campus teachers. The Director of Instruction acts as the instructional leader for both middle and high school grades and is responsible for helping students achieve outcomes as outlined in the ESLRs. The Director of Instruction is responsible for executing Board policies, the conduct of educational activities, and the recruitment, training, and evaluation of teaching and support staff under the supervision and direction of the Superintendent.

Commandant of Cadets
The Commandant of Cadets supervises the Leaders of Character (LOC) teachers. The Commandant acts as the instructional leader for both middle and high LOC classes and is responsible for helping students achieve outcomes as outlined in the LOC curriculum. The Commandant is responsible for executing Board policies, the conduct of military activities, and the recruitment, training, and evaluation of LOC teaching and support staff under the supervision and direction of the Superintendent. The Commandant of Cadets also supervises the safety and facilities staff.
OMI Board

Superintendent


Business Manager Enrollment Dir.

Dir. of Instruction Dean of Students Commandant Athletics/Wellness Director


Academic Faculty Military Faculty Kitchen Staff

Human Resources and Finance Staff Facilities and Security Staff

Front Office Staff


Organizational Chart



The organizational chart below illustrates the function organization of OMI.

Parental Input Regarding the Educational Program

As required by Education Code § 47605, OMI will use a range of methods to consult with parents and receive parental input. The methods currently in use for parents with students attending OMI include parent/student/teacher conferences, open houses, parent education events, email and phone communication, parent and student bulletins, parent participation on WASC accreditation committees, parent reports to the Governing Board each month, and parent participation in the parent council.

Parent/Student/Teacher Conferences and Cadet Success Teams: Parent/student/teacher conferences are scheduled upon request of a teacher or a parent. These conferences may occur at any time during the year. Cadet Success Team meetings also occur as needed.

Open House: OMI conducts an all campus Open House at least once per year. Teachers are available and all parents are invited.

Email and Phone Communication: All teachers have access to email and phones in order to communicate with families.

Parent and Student Bulletins: Weekly bilingual (Spanish) bulletins are sent home notifying parents of key dates, reminders, athletic events, special events or meetings, PAC meetings, academic deadlines, and more.

Parent Participation on Committees: Parents participate on WASC accreditation committees and help shape the educational programs at OMI.

Parent reports to the Board of Directors: At each Governing Board meeting, the Parent Advisory Council president reports on PAC activities and discusses parental issues or concerns with the board.
Parent Participation in OMI: Ongoing participation by parents is an important part of OMI. All OMI parents are required to contribute a minimum of 25 hours of volunteer service per school year in one or more of a variety of projects, including donations of emergency preparedness and classroom supplies, participation in fund raisers, and volunteering on campus in classrooms, at field trips, etc.
OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE has established complaint procedures that address both complaints alleging discrimination or violations of law and complaints regarding other areas.  OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE will not, at any time, refer complaints to the District.   
The complaint procedures will include the clear information with respect to the response timeline of the school, whether the school’s response will be in writing, the party identified to respond to complaints, the party identified and charged with making final decisions regarding complaints, and whether the final decision will be issued in writing.  The procedures will also identify an ombudsperson for situations in which the school leader is the subject of the complaint.  The complaint procedures will be clearly articulated in the school’s student and family handbook or distributed widely. 
OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE will designate at least one employee to coordinate its efforts to comply with and carry out its responsibilities under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) including any investigation of any complaint filed with OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE alleging its noncompliance with these laws or alleging any actions which would be prohibited by these laws.  OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE will notify all its students and employees of the name, office address, and telephone number of the designated employee or employees. 
OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE will adopt and publish grievance procedures providing for prompt and equitable resolution of student and employee complaints alleging any action, which would be prohibited by Title IX, or Section 504. 

OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE will implement specific and continuing steps to notify applicants for admission and employment, students and parents of elementary and secondary school students, employees, sources of referral of applicants for admission and employment, and all unions or professional organizations holding collective bargaining or professional agreements with the recipient, that it does not discriminate on the basis of sex or mental or physical disability in the educational program or activity which it operates, and that it is required by Title IX and Section 504 not to discriminate in such a manner.

Section V

Employee QUALIFICATIONS



The qualifications to be met by individuals to be employed by the school.” – California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(E)
Hiring Process and Employee Qualifications
OMI recruits professional, effective and qualified personnel for all administrative, instructional, instructional support, and non-instructional support capacities who believe in the mission of the school. In accordance with Education Code § 47605(d)(1), OMI is nonsectarian in its employment practices and all other operations. OMI does not discriminate against any individual (employee or pupil) on the basis of any characteristic described in Education Code Section 220. All employees of OMI will work under an employment contract.
Superintendent
Candidates for this position will possess:


  • Excellent communication and community-building skills

  • Administrative, school-based experience

  • Extensive knowledge of curriculum development

  • A record of success in developing teachers and managing school operations

  • Experience in managing the finances of schools

  • This individual must meet all of the following minimum requirements:

    • Valid California Administrative Credential, or equivalent experience

    • Valid California Teaching Credential, or equivalent experience

    • A Master’s Degree or higher is desirable


Director of Instruction
The Director of Instruction supervises the campus teachers. The Director of Instruction shall act as the instructional leader at the School and shall be responsible for helping the School students achieve outcomes as outlined in the Educational Program. The Director of Instruction will be responsible for executing Board policies, the conduct of educational activities, and the recruitment, training, and evaluation of teaching and support staff as further outlined in the job specification and employment contract.
Candidates for this position will possess:


  • Excellent communication and community-building skills

  • Administrative experience

  • Extensive knowledge of curriculum development

  • A record of success in developing teachers

  • Experience in performance assessment

  • This individual must meet all of the following minimum requirements:

    • Valid California Administrative Credential, or equivalent experience

    • Valid California Teaching Credential, or equivalent experience

    • A Master’s Degree or higher is desirable



Commandant
The Commandant of Cadets supervises the Leaders of Character (LOC) teachers. The Commandant acts as the instructional leader for both middle and high LOC classes and is responsible for helping students achieve outcomes as outlined in the LOC curriculum. The Commandant is responsible for executing Board policies, the conduct of military activities, and the recruitment, training, and evaluation of LOC teaching and support staff under the supervision and direction of the Superintendent. The Commandant of Cadets also supervises the safety and facilities staff. The California Military Department, in collaboration with the superintendent and board, select the Commandant.
Teachers
OMI complies with Education Code § 47605(l), which states in pertinent part:
Teachers in charter schools shall hold a Commission on Teacher Credentialing certificate, permit or other document equivalent to that which a teacher in other public schools would be required to hold. These documents shall be maintained on file at the charter school and shall be subject to periodic inspection by the chartering authority. It is the intent of the Legislature that charter schools be given flexibility with regard to non-core, non-college preparatory courses.
Core Teaching Faculty, as providers of the day-to-day teaching and guidance to the students, are the primary resources of the School. In a school culture that promotes academic rigor and success for all students, grade level core teachers are responsible for, but not limited to:

  • Subject instruction

  • Curriculum planning

  • Collaboration with fellow faculty and administrators

  • Student assessment

  • Communication with parents

  • A commitment to students and learning

  • Knowledge about their subject material

  • A willingness to be innovative and dynamic in their instruction methods

Minimum requirements are



  • Bachelor’s Degree

  • Valid California Teaching Credential or equivalent.

  • If appropriate, or determined by OMI or the State of California as required, the individual will hold all appropriate supplemental credentials.

  • Additionally, core teachers, as defined by the No Child Left Behind Act, shall meet the applicable definitions of the highly qualified requirements. (Teachers of core, college-preparatory classes shall meet the applicable definitions of the “highly qualified” requirements). Under NCLB, in order to teach a core class, a teacher is designated as “highly qualified” if they:




  1. Hold a Bachelor’s Degree; and

  2. Hold a Commission on Teacher Credentialing certificate, permit or other document equivalent to that which a teacher in other public schools would be required to hold; and

  3. Demonstrate sufficient subject matter competency in accordance with Title 5, California Code of Regulations Sections 6111, 6112 and other applicable law.

In accordance with the flexibility provided under Education Code Section 47605(l), teachers are not required to hold a California Commission on teacher Credentialing certificates, or to be “highly qualified” in order to teach non-core, non-college preparatory courses. Educators in non-core, non-college preparatory classes, defined as those who are providing specialized learning opportunities, e.g., physical education, will have subject matter expertise, professional experience, and the demonstrated ability to engage learner’s participation in the educational process as determined by the School.



Paraprofessionals who are required to be “highly qualified” under the federal No Child Left Behind Act, will meet NCLB requirements.
All employees, including but not limited to librarians, library aids and health aids will possess the personal characteristics, knowledge base and/or relevant experiences in the responsibilities and qualifications identified in the posted job description as determined by OMI.
All employees will be fingerprinted and will successfully pass all required Department of Justice and LiveScan checks and undergo background checks that provide for the health and safety of faculty, staff and students.
In accordance with applicable law, OMI reserves the right to recruit, interview and hire anyone at any time who has the best qualifications to fill any of its positions and/or vacancies.
OMI will use a range of procedures and resources in the identification and hiring of the most qualified employees. Position descriptions will appropriately detail the work responsibilities and subject matter competence required. Recruitment will include the use of comprehensive job listing services such as EdJoin and Craigslist. Other sources such as university and college placement services may be used. OMI has traditionally participated in job fairs, such as the one sponsored annually by CalWest. The hiring process for full time staff is intense. It typically includes a rigorous paper screening process and multiple structured interviews. Participants in the hiring process may include administration, teachers, other staff members, and parents. Teaching applicants typically are required to prepare and present a sample lesson to OMI cadets. All this effort is part of OMI’s commitment to find the best possible employees who are committed to supporting high levels of achievement by all students and to the mission and vision of OMI.
Professional Development: Retention and Development of a Highly Qualified Faculty
Once employed, ongoing professional development is an integral part of professional practice for all teachers and administrators at OMI. Ongoing professional development is essential to the continued development of faculty skills and expertise, and the retention of high quality faculty members. OMI’s professional development follows the objectives and the action plan created in the 2007 WASC accreditation process. Specialized professional development includes but is not limited to Reader Apprenticeship, Advanced Placement, and mathematics teacher training. All full time OMI employees are evaluated at least annually. The faculty evaluation system was created based on a review of the literature, practice at other public and private schools, and extensive discussion with faculty, administration, and the Board.
Employee Compensation and Benefits
OMI recognizes that it needs to provide employees who work at OMI with competitive salaries and benefits. In addition to the competitive salaries provided by OMI, OMI provides support for benefits which are more substantial than those provided by most local charter schools and local districts. OMI currently provides a comprehensive package of benefits including sick leave, health, dental, and vision.
Employees are informed of their benefits, their rights and policies and procedures through the OMI Employee Handbook. The OMI Employee Handbook includes information regarding recruitment, working conditions, salaries, benefits, and employment policies. Salaries, benefits, and working conditions are reviewed annually by administration, and recommendations for changes are made to the Board. Health: Currently OMI contributes 100% of the monthly premium for a group health insurance plan for all full-time employees. OMI provides a debit card for co-pay payments. However, each employee covered by the health insurance plan is currently charged $300 per year (drawn on a monthly basis from salary) for membership in the plan. The employee may have dependents added to the insurance plan, subject to the limitations set forth in the plan. Should an employee leave OMI, this policy may be continued at the employee’s expense, after which the employee may exercise his/her conversion option (COBRA coverage). Information about COBRA coverage may be obtained from the Business Manager. Dental: Currently, coverage is available to full-time employees. The Institute pays the premium for the employee. The employee may have dependents added to the insurance plan, subject to the limitations set by the plans. Vision: Currently OMI offers a vision plan to fulltime employees.
All full time teachers are paid salary and offered annual employment contracts. Other employees are compensated in alignment with their job descriptions.
The benefits described herein are subject to notification by the OMI Board as needed to attract a qualified staff and to ensure fiscal viability.
Evaluation of Employees
Faculty members are evaluated annually pursuant to an evaluation process that includes classroom observations, self-evaluation, and evaluation by the administrator, and a professional growth plan. Faculty members are evaluated based on the following seven dimensions.


  1. Content Knowledge

  2. Designing, Planning, Documentation, and Assessment of Work

  3. Pedagogy, Instruction, Delivery

  4. Classroom Management

  5. Student Performance

  6. Parent Partnership

  7. Professionalism/Professional Responsibilities

Section VI

Description of

EMPLOYEE RIGHTS



Employee Representation
A declaration whether or not the charter school shall be deemed the exclusive public school employer of the employees of the charter school for the purposes of the Educational Employment Relations Act”

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(O)


OMI will be deemed the exclusive public school employer of the employees of the charter school for the purposes of the Educational Employment Relations Act (“EERA”).
Rights of School District Employees
A description of the rights of any employee of the school district upon leaving the

employment of the school district to work in a charter school, and of any rights of return to the school district after employment at a charter school.”

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(M)


Employees of OUSD who choose to leave the employment of OUSD to work in OMI will have no automatic rights of return to OUSD after employment by OMI unless specifically granted by OUSD through a leave of absence or other agreement.
All employees of OMI will be considered the exclusive employees of OMI and not of OUSD, unless otherwise mutually agreed in writing. Sick or vacation leave or years of service credit at OUSD or any other school district will not be transferred to OMI. Employment by OMI provides no rights of employment at any other entity, including any rights in the case of closure of OMI.
Retirement Benefits
The manner by which staff members of the charter schools will be covered by the State Teachers’ Retirement System, the Public Employees’ Retirement System or federal social security.”

    • California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(K)


All full-time employees at OMI will participate in a qualified retirement plan including but not limited to State Teachers Retirement System (“STRS”), Public Employees Retirement System (“PERS”), and the federal social security system based on their eligibility to participate. OMI teachers participate in STRS. Non-credentialed staff participate in PERS or federal social security. Staff may have access to other school sponsored retirement plans according to policies developed by the Board and adopted as the school’s employee policies.

Section VII

HEALTH AND SAFETY

Procedures

Governing Law: The procedures that the school will follow to ensure the health and safety of pupils and staff. These procedures shall include the requirement that each employee of the school furnish the school record summary as described in § 44237.

California Education Code § 4 7605(b) (5) (F)


The following is a summary of the health and safety policies of OMI:
Procedures for Background Checks
Employees and contractors of OMI are required to submit to a criminal background check and furnish a criminal record summary as required by Education Code §§ 44237 and 45125.1. New employees must submit to a Livescan (electronic fingerprinting) background check and have a clear criminal record from both the Department of Justice in accordance with Sections 44237 and 45125.1 prior to commencing employment. The OMI Director of Instruction monitors compliance with this policy. The Superintendent monitors the fingerprinting and background clearance of the Director of Instruction.
Volunteers who volunteer outside of the direct supervision of an employee are fingerprinted and receive background clearance prior to volunteering without the direct supervision of an employee. Volunteers who volunteer within the direct supervision of an employee are additionally cleared through the Megan’s Law web site.
Role of Staff as Mandated Child Abuse Reporters
All employees are mandated child abuse reporters and will follow all applicable reporting laws.
TB Testing
OMI follows the requirement of Education Code § 49406 in requiring tuberculosis testing of all employees.
Immunizations
OMI adheres to all laws related to legally required immunizations for entering students pursuant to Health and Safety Code §§ 120325-120375, and Title 17, California Code of Regulations §§ 6000-6075.
CPR/First Aid Training
Over 50% of the employees of OMI are CPR/First Aid trained.
Medication in School
OMI will adhere to Education Code § 49423 regarding administration of medication in school.
Vision/Hearing/Scoliosis
OMI will adhere to Education Code § 49450, et seq, as applicable to the grade levels served by the school.
Oral Health Examinations
OMI will require its students to comply with all oral health examinations pursuant to Education Code § 49452.8.
Diabetes
Beginning in the 2010-11 school year, OMI will provide an information sheet regarding type 2 diabetes to the parent or guardian of incoming 7th grade students, pursuant to Education Code Section 49452.7.  The information sheet shall include, but shall not be limited to, all of the following:


  1. A description of type 2 diabetes.




  1. A description of the risk factors and warning signs associated with type 2 diabetes.




  1. A recommendation that students displaying or possibly suffering from risk factors or warning signs associated with type 2 diabetes should be screened for type 2 diabetes.




  1. A description of treatments and prevention of methods of type 2 diabetes.




  1. A description of the different types of diabetes screening tests available.


Emergency Preparedness
OMI adheres to an Emergency Preparedness Plan drafted specifically to the needs of the school site. This plan includes, but is not limited to, the following responses: fire, flood, earthquake, terrorist threats, and hostage situations.
Blood Borne Pathogens
OMI meets state and federal standards for dealing with blood borne pathogens and other potentially infectious materials in the work place.
Whenever exposed to blood or other bodily fluids through injury or accident, staff and students follow the latest medical protocol for disinfecting procedures.
Drug Free/Alcohol Free/Smoke Free Environment
OMI maintains a drug, alcohol and tobacco free workplace.
Integrated Complaint and Investigation Procedure
OMI utilizes our existing complaint and investigation procedure to centralize all complaints and concerns coming into the school. Under the direction of the Board, the Superintendent is responsible for investigation, remediation, and follow-up on matters submitted through this procedure.

Comprehensive Sexual Harassment Polices and Procedures
OMI is committed to providing a school that is free from sexual harassment, as well as any harassment based upon such factors as race, religion, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, age, medical condition, marital status, sexual orientation, or disability. Misconduct of this nature is very serious and will be addressed in accordance with OMI sexual harassment policy.
School Facility Safety
OMI complies with all applicable federal environmental laws. OMI complies with Education Code § 47610 by either utilizing facilities that are compliant with the Field Act or facilities that are compliant with the State Building Code. OMI agrees to test, or if in a district owned or leased facility, to verify, that sprinkler systems, fire extinguishers, and fire alarms are tested annually at its facilities to ensure that they are maintained in an operable condition at all times. OMI conducts fire drills and earthquake drills pursuant to Education Code Section 32001. OMI also has 14 Automated External Defibrillators on the campus and in all school vans in the event of a cardiac incident.
Asbestos
OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE shall occupy facilities that comply with the Asbestos requirement as cited in the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA), 40CFR part 763.  AHERA requires that any building leased or acquired that is to be used as a school or administrative building shall maintain an asbestos management plan.

Section VIII

DISPUTE RESOLUTION

Process, Oversight, Reporting

and Renewal

The procedures to be followed by the Charter School and the entity granting the charter to resolve disputes relating to provisions of the charter.”



California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(N)
Disputes Between OMI and OUSD
In the event of a dispute between OMI and OUSD relating to provisions of this charter, OMI staff, employees and Board members and OUSD agree to first frame the issue in written format (a “dispute statement”) and refer the issue to OUSD’s designee and the OMI’s Superintendent. In the event that OUSD believes that the dispute relates to an issue that could lead to revocation of the Charter in accordance with Education Code § 47607, this will be noted in the written dispute statement.

Actions that Could lead to Revocation: Charter School Due Process
In the event that the District determines that OMI has engaged in an act that could lead to revocation of the Charter, the District and OMI shall have a face to face meeting within 10 days of the OUSD designee’s determination that a violation has occurred. Present in the face-to- face meeting shall be at least the Superintendent of the District or designee and the OMI Superintendent. If after such meeting, the District determines that a violation has occurred which requires a cure, the District may send a formal written notification to the School outlining the alleged violation and demanding the violation be cured. The School shall have a reasonable amount of time after the date such formal written notice was sent to cure the violation. If the violation cannot be cured within the time period specified by the District, the parties may agree to another predetermined time to commence to cure and diligently prosecute the cure to completion.
Thereafter, revocation of the charter may be commenced by the District Board of Education in accordance with Education Code Section 47607 or applicable law.
Disputes Not Leading to Revocation: Dispute Resolution
The staff and Governing Board members of OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE agree to attempt to resolve all disputes between the District and OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE regarding this charter pursuant to the terms of this section. Both will refrain from public commentary regarding any disputes until the matter has progressed through the dispute resolution process.  
Any controversy or claim arising out of or relating to the charter agreement between the District and OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE, except any controversy or claim that in any way related to revocation of this charter, shall be handled first through an informal process in accordance with the procedures set forth below.  


(1) Any controversy or claim arising out of or relating to the charter agreement, except any controversy or claim that in any way related to revocation of this charter, must be put in writing (“Written Notification”) by the party asserting the existence of such dispute.  The Written Notification must identify the nature of the dispute and all supporting facts known to the party giving the Written Notification.  The Written Notification may be tendered by personal delivery, by facsimile, or by certified mail.  The Written Notification shall be deemed received (a) if personally delivered, upon date of delivery to the address of the person to receive such notice if delivered by 5:00 PM or otherwise on the business day following personal delivery; (b) if by facsimile, upon electronic confirmation of receipt; or (c) if by mail, two (2) business days after deposit in the U.S. Mail.  All written notices shall be addressed as follows:  

To Charter School, c/o School Director:

            OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE  

3877 Lusk Street



Oakland, CA 94608                                                         

To Coordinator, Office of Charter Schools:    Office of Charter Schools

       Oakland Unified School District

       1025 Second Avenue, Room 206            

Oakland, California 94606   
(2) A written response (“Written Response”) shall be tendered to the party providing the Written Notification within twenty (20) business days from the date of receipt of the Written Notification.  The Written Response shall state the responding party’s position on all issues stated in the Written Notification and set forth all fact which the responding party believes supports its position.  The Written Response may be tendered by personal delivery, by facsimile, or by certified mail.  The Written Response shall be deemed received (a) if personally delivered, upon date of delivery to the address of the person to receive such notice if delivered by 5:00p.m., or otherwise on the business day following personal delivery; (b) if by facsimile, upon electronic confirmation of receipt; or (c) if by mail, two (2) business days after deposit in the U.S. Mail.  The parties agree to schedule a conference to discuss the claim or controversy (“Issue Conference”).  The Issue Conference shall take place within fifteen (15) business days from the date the Written Response is received by the other party.   
(3) If the controversy, claim, or dispute is not resolved by mutual agreement at the Issue Conference, then either party may request that the matter be resolved by mediation.  Each party shall bear its own costs and expenses associated with the mediation.  The mediator’s fees and the administrative fees of the mediation shall be shared equally among the parties.  Mediation proceedings shall commence within 60 days from the date of the Issue Conference.  The parties shall mutually agree upon the selection of a mediator to resolve the controversy or claim at dispute.  If no agreement on a mediator is reached within 30 days after a request to mediate, the parties shall use processes and procedures of the American Arbitration Association (“AAA”) to have an arbitrator appointed.  
(4) If the mediation is not successful, the parties agree to settle the controversy, claim or dispute by binding arbitration conducted by a single arbitrator in accordance with the guidelines of the AAA.  If no agreement on an arbitrator is reached within 30 days after a request to mediate, the AAA shall select the arbitrator.  The arbitrator must be an active member of the California State Bar or a retired judge of the state or federal judiciary of California.  Each party shall bear its own costs and expenses associated with the arbitration.  The arbitrator’s fees and the administrative fees of the arbitration shall be shared equally among the parties.  Each party shall bear its own costs and expenses.    
(5) Any party who fails or refuses to submit to arbitration shall bear all costs and expenses incurred by the other party in compelling arbitration of any controversy, claim, or dispute.
OMI’s Uniform Complaint Procedure
Oakland Military Institute’s (“charter school”) policy is to comply with applicable federal and state laws and regulations. The charter school is the local agency primarily responsible for compliance with federal and state laws and regulations governing educational programs. Pursuant to this policy, persons responsible for conducting investigations shall be knowledgeable about the laws and programs which they are assigned to investigate. This complaint procedure is adopted to provide a uniform system of complaint processing for the following types of complaints:

(1) complaints of discrimination against any protected group including actual or perceived, including discrimination on the basis of age, sex, sexual orientation, gender, ethnic group identification, race, ancestry, national origin, religion, color, or mental or physical disability, or on the basis of a person’s association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics in any charter school program or activity.; and



(2) complaints of violations of state or federal law and regulations governing the following programs including but not limited to: special education, title ii, section 504 of the rehabilitation act, consolidated categorical aid, no child left behind, migrant education, career technical and technical education training programs, child care and development programs, child nutrition program
The charter school acknowledges and respects every individual’s rights to privacy. Discrimination complaints shall be investigated in a manner that protects the confidentiality of the parties and the integrity of the process. This includes keeping the identity of the complainant confidential, as appropriate and except to the extent necessary to carry out the investigation or proceedings, as determined by the superintendent or designee on a case-by-case basis.
The charter school prohibits any form of retaliation against any complainant in the complaint process, including but not limited to a complainant’s filing of a complaint or the reporting of instances of discrimination. Such participation shall not in any way affect the status, grades or work assignments of the complainant.
Compliance officers - The governing board designates the following compliance officer(s) to receive and investigate complaints and to ensure the charter school’s compliance with law: Superintendent , Oakland Military Institute, 3877 Lusk Street, Oakland, CA 94608
The superintendent or designee shall ensure that employees designated to investigate complaints are knowledgeable about the laws and programs for which they are responsible. Designated employees may have access to legal counsel as determined by the superintendent or designee.
Notifications- The superintendent or designee shall annually provide written notification of the charter school’s uniform complaint procedures to students, employees, parents/guardians, the governing board, appropriate private officials or representatives, and other interested parties.
The superintendent or designee shall make available copies of the charter school’s uniform complaint procedures free of charge. The inclusion of this policy in this handbook meets this requirement.
Procedures- The following procedures shall be used to address all complaints which allege that the charter school has violated federal or state laws or regulations governing educational programs. Compliance officers shall maintain a record of each complaint and subsequent related actions.
All parties involved in allegations shall be notified when a complaint is filed, when a complaint meeting or hearing is scheduled, and when a decision or ruling is made.
Step 1: Filing of complaint Any individual, public agency, or organization may file a written complaint of alleged noncompliance by the charter school.
A complaint alleging unlawful discrimination shall be initiated no later than six months from the date when the alleged discrimination occurred, or six months from the date when the complainant first obtained knowledge of the facts of the alleged discrimination. A complaint may be filed by a person who alleges that he/she personally suffered unlawful discrimination or by a person who believes that an individual or any specific class of individuals has been subjected to unlawful discrimination. The complaint shall be presented to the compliance officer who shall maintain a log of complaints received, providing each with a code number and date stamp. If a complainant is unable to put a complaint in writing due to conditions such as a disability or illiteracy, charter school staff shall assist him/her in the filing of the complaint.
Step 2: Mediation Within three days of receiving the complaint, the compliance officer may informally discuss with the complainant the possibility of using mediation. If the complainant agrees to mediation, the compliance officer shall make arrangements for this process.
Before initiating the mediation of a discrimination complaint, the compliance officer shall ensure that all parties agree to make the mediator a party to related confidential information. If the mediation process does not resolve the problem within the parameters of law, the compliance officer shall proceed with his/her investigation of the complaint. The use of mediation shall not extend the charter school’s timelines for investigating and resolving the complaint unless the complainant agrees in writing to such an extension of time.
Step 3: Investigation of complaint - The compliance officer is encouraged to hold an investigative meeting within five days of receiving the complaint or an unsuccessful attempt to mediate the complaint. This meeting shall provide an opportunity for the complainant and/or his/her representative to repeat the complaint orally. The complainant and/or his/her representative shall have an opportunity to present the complaint and evidence or information leading to evidence to support the allegations in the complaint.
A complainant’s refusal to provide the charter school’s investigator with documents or other evidence related to the allegations in the complaint, or his/her failure or refusal to cooperate in the investigation or his/her engagement in any other obstruction of the investigation, may result in the dismissal of the complaint because of a lack of evidence to support the allegation.
The charter school’s refusal to provide the investigator with access to records and/or other information related to the allegation in the complaint, or its failure or refusal to cooperate in the investigation or its engagement in any other obstruction of the investigation, may result in a finding, based on evidence collected, that a violation has occurred and may result in the imposition of a remedy in favor of the complainant.
Step 4: Response - Option 1: Unless extended by written agreement with the complainant, the compliance officer shall prepare and send to the complainant a written report of the charter school’s investigation and decision, as described in step #5 below, within 60 days of the charter school’s receipt of the complaint.
Option 2: Within 30 days of receiving the complaint, the compliance officer shall prepare and send to the complainant a written report of the charter school’s investigation and decision, as described in step #5 below. If the complainant is dissatisfied with the compliance officer’s decision, he/she may, within five days, file his/her complaint in writing with the board.
The board may consider the matter at its next regular board meeting or at a special board meeting convened in order to meet the 60-day time limit within which the complaint must be answered. The board may decide not to hear the complaint, in which case the compliance officer’s decision shall be final. If the board hears the complaint, the compliance officer shall send the board’s decision to the complainant within 60 days of the charter school’s initial receipt of the complaint or within the time period that has been specified in a written agreement with the complainant.
Step 5: Final written decision - The charter school’s decision shall be in writing and sent to the complainant. The charter school’s decision shall be written in English and in the language of the complainant whenever feasible or as required by law. The decision shall include:

  1. The findings of fact based on evidence gathered.

  2. The conclusion(s) of law.

  3. Disposition of the complaint.

  4. Rationale for such disposition.

  5. Corrective actions, if any are warranted.

  6. Notice of the complainant’s right to appeal the charter school’s decision within fifteen (15) days to the cde and procedures to be followed for initiating such an appeal.

  7. For discrimination complaints arising under state law, notice that the complainant must wait until 60 days have elapsed from the filing of an appeal with the CDE before pursuing civil law remedies.

  8. For discrimination complaints arising under federal law such complaint may be made at any time to the U.S. department of education, office for civil rights.

If an employee is disciplined as a result of the complaint, the decision shall simply state that effective action was taken and that the employee was informed of the charter school’s expectations. The report shall not give any further information as to the nature of the disciplinary action.


Appeals to the California Department of Education (CDE)

If dissatisfied with the charter school’s decision, the complainant may appeal in writing to the CDE within fifteen (15) days of receiving the charter school’s decision. When appealing to the CDE, the complainant must specify the basis for the appeal of the decision and whether the facts are incorrect and/or the law has been misapplied. The appeal shall be accompanied by a copy of the locally filed complaint and a copy of the charter school’s decision. Upon notification by the CDE that the complainant has appealed the charter school’s decision, the superintendent or designee shall forward the following documents to the CDE:



  1. A copy of the original complaint.

  2. A copy of the decision.

  3. A summary of the nature and extent of the investigation conducted by the charter school, if not covered by the decision.

  4. A copy of the investigation file, including but not limited to all notes, interviews, and documents submitted by all parties and gathered by the investigator.

  5. A report of any action taken to resolve the complaint.

  6. A copy of the charter school’s complaint procedures.

  7. Other relevant information requested by the CDE.

The CDE may directly intervene in the complaint without waiting for action by the charter school when one of the conditions listed in title 5, California code of regulations, section 4650 5 CCR 4650 exists, including cases in which the charter school has not taken action within 60 days of the date the complaint was filed with the charter school.
Civil law remedies A complainant may pursue available civil law remedies outside of the charter school’s complaint procedures. Complainants may seek assistance from mediation centers or public/private interest attorneys. Civil law remedies that may be imposed by a court include, but are not limited to, injunctions and restraining orders. For discrimination complaints arising under state law, however, a complainant must wait until 60 days have elapsed from the filing of an appeal with the CDE before pursuing civil law remedies. The moratorium does not apply to injunctive relief and is applicable only if the charter school has appropriately, and in a timely manner, apprised the complainant of his/her right to file a complaint in accordance with 5 CCR 4622.

Section IX

Student Admissions, Attendance,

and Suspension/Expulsion POLICIES

Admission Requirements
Admission requirements, if applicable.”

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(H)


OMI will not discriminate on the basis of the characteristics listed in Section 220 (actual or perceived disability, gender, nationality, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other characteristic that is contained in the definition of hate crimes set forth in Section 422.55 of the Penal Code or association with an individual who has any of the aforementioned characteristics). All educational opportunities will be offered free of tuition.
The recruitment activities are planned to reach all students in grades five through eleven (rising into grades 6-12) in the local community and to promote a diverse student base. An informative website has been developed (www.oakmil.org) and will be regularly updated with information about OMI and our admission process. The website will include information explaining that OMI is open to and welcomes all students who share our mission, and that academic support services are available for students that need them. An information brochure is also available. The brochure also explains that OMI is open to all students. A series of publicized informational meetings are held each year to inform the community about OMI and the admission process. Advertisements will be taken out in local newspapers, such as the Oakland Tribune. Information tables will be set up at major community events. Additionally, information about OMI will be provided to local community based organizations and groups, and to local churches.
A copy of the OMI Student Handbook is provided to each student annually at the beginning of the school year.
Enrollment in OMI is open to any student who resides in California who is committed to completing an academically rigorous college preparatory program and is committed to fulfilling his or her duties to learn to lead. Enrollment is not based on prior academic achievement. OMI will actively recruit a diverse student population from Oakland and the surrounding region who understand and value the school’s mission and are committed to the school’s instructional and operational philosophy. Prospective students and their parents or guardians will be briefed regarding the school’s instructional and operational philosophy and will be given a copy or summary of the school’s student-related policies and honor code. Said honor code will include a clear expectation of student conduct and respect for others and shall be in conformance with all applicable state and federal laws.
Although OMI will be open to any resident of the state of California, if the number of students who wish to attend the school exceeds the School’s capacity, admission, except for existing students of OMI, shall be determined by public random drawing. Preference in the public, random drawing will be given in the following order:


  • siblings of existing students;

  • children of employees and OMI Board members;

  • residents of the District;

  • other California residents.


After all available spots have been filled, students will be placed on a waiting list in the order in which their names are drawn. Should spaces open during the course of the school year, OMI will contact students in the order they appear on the waiting list. These preferences may be altered as necessary to meet any applicable federal or state requirements.
The District and OMI agree that the school may require attendance at an orientation meeting and application documents such as a written statement from each student describing why the student wishes to attend and a statement from a parent or guardian listing expectations. OMI will provide reasonable accommodations to facilitate the admission process. OMI will not use admission criteria involving minimum cumulative grade point averages nor require the provision of information that would reveal cumulative grade point averages before the admission process has ended.
A military leadership course is a valuable tool to acquaint new enrollees to the school’s culture, behavior codes, terminology, routines and requirements. All new students are required to attend and successfully complete this training. OMI will establish a Review Board and standards to evaluate each student’s performance record at this military training. If a student fails to attend or fails to participate successfully, then OMI’s Review Board may discharge the student, prior to the start of the regular academic year.
After admission, OMI may require new students to attend summer school to prepare students for the academic rigor of a college preparatory curriculum. If a student fails to attend or fails to participate successfully, then OMI’s Review Board may discharge the student, prior to the start of the regular academic year.
An open application period will occur annually at dates to be available to the public on our website or by contacting OMI.
By October 1 of each year, OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE will notify the District in writing of the application deadline and proposed lottery date.  OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE will ensure that all application materials will reference these dates as well as provide complete information regarding application procedures, key dates, and admissions preferences and requirements consistent with approved charter.
Means to Achieve Racial/Ethnic Balance Reflective of District
The means by which the school will achieve a racial and ethnic balance among its pupils that is reflective of the general population residing within the territorial jurisdiction of the school district to which the charter petition is submitted.”

California Education Code Section § 47605(b)(5)(G)


OMI strives, through recruitment and admissions practices, to achieve a racial and ethnic balance among its pupils that is reflective of the general population residing within the territorial jurisdiction of the OUSD.
OMI’s student population is already reasonably reflective of that of OUSD’s.
OMI employs a recruitment strategy that includes, but is not necessarily limited to, the following elements or strategies which focus on achieving and maintaining a racial and ethnic balance among students that is reflective of the general population residing within the territorial jurisdiction of OUSD:


  • providing Spanish language materials;




  • An enrollment process that is scheduled to include a timeline that allows for a broad-based application process;

  • The development and distribution of promotional and informational material that reaches out to all of the various racial and ethnic groups represented in the territorial jurisdiction of OUSD;

  • Outreach activities include, but are not limited to: Press releases and other communications with local print and broadcast news media;

  • Posting of notices in public buildings and spaces, local businesses and religious institutions.

  • OUSD has expressed its interest in OMI student population reflecting the racial and ethnic balance of OUSD as a whole. In light of this mutual goal, OMI requests that OUSD include information about OMI on its website and in its informational materials.


As part of outreach to Spanish speakers, OMI prepares general information sheets, and other key documents in Spanish.
Public School Attendance Alternatives
The public school attendance alternatives for pupils residing within the school district who choose not to attend charter schools.”

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(L)


No student may be required to attend OMI. Students who do not want to attend OMI may attend the schools in the school district where they reside, or pursue an intra- or inter-district transfer in accordance with existing enrollment and transfer policies of their district or county of residence. Parents and guardians of each student enrolled in OMI are informed on admissions forms that the students have no right to admission in a particular school of an local education agency (or program of any local education agency) as a consequence of enrollment in OMI, except to the extent that such a right is extended by the local education agency.
Pupil Suspension and Expulsion
The procedures by which pupils can be suspended or expelled.”

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(J)


Students will not be suspended or expelled for academic failure. Students will only be suspended or expelled for actions which are defined in subsection (b) below.
OMI acknowledges the responsibility of each student, parent, volunteer, faculty, staff member and administrator to contribute to the wellbeing of the community by demonstrating responsibility and accountability for individual and group actions. It is OMI’s goal to enhance the quality of relationships, the quality of learning, and the quality of the community through shared responsibility.
The purpose of discipline at OMI is to:


  • Promote genuine pupil development;

  • Increase respect of authority;

  • Assist in the growth of self-discipline; and

  • Provide an orderly atmosphere conducive to learning and promoting character development.


The OMI suspension and expulsion policies are printed and distributed to the OMI community as part of the School’s Student-Parent Handbook. The Handbook clearly describes our academic and behavioral expectations including attendance, work habits, harassment, substance abuse, violence, and safety requirements. School discipline is addressed during orientation and all students, parents, and guardians are asked to verify that they have reviewed and understand the policies and procedures.
Any student who engages in repeated violations of OMI’s behavioral expectations may be required to attend a meeting with the OMI staff and the student’s parent/guardian. OMI may prepare a specific, written remediation agreement outlining future student conduct expectations, timelines, and consequences for failure to meet the expectations which may include, but are not limited to suspension or expulsion. Specific policies regarding suspension and expulsion appear below. OMI’s policies provide all students with due process and have been developed to conform to applicable federal laws relating to discipline of students with exceptional needs prior to beginning instruction.


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