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Oakland Military Institute College Preparatory Academy

A CALIFORNIA CHARTER SCHOOL

Submitted to
Oakland Unified School District Board of Education

December 4, 2013

Table of

CONTENTS


INDEX OF LEGAL REQUIREMENTS…………………………………………………………………………... 2

(ALL PAGE NUMBERS SUBJECT TO CHANGE BASED UPON FINAL VERSION OF APPROVED CHARTER)



CHARTER SCHOOL INTENT AND CHARTER REQUIREMENTS………….……………………. 4

AFFIRMATIONS/ASSURANCES………………………………………………………….…………………….. 5

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY/OVERVIEW OF OAKLAND MILITARY INSTITUTE,

COLLEGE PREPARATORY ACADEMY…………………………………………………..………. 7

SECTION I – INTRODUCTION…………………………………………….…………………………………………. 8

OMI MAKES IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO PUBLIC EDUCATION……………………. 8

OFFERING IMPROVED ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE IN OAKLAND…………….………… 9

CALIFORNIA IS ONE OF THE POOREST PERFORMING STATES IN THE UNITED



STATES ……………………………………………..……………………………………………. 12

THE NEED FOR IMPROVING EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES …………………. 12

THE UNITED STATES IS BEHIND COMPARED TO OTHER NATIONS………………. 12

THE NEED FOR IMPROVED EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES IN TODAY’S WORLD



DEMANDS INNOVATIONS LIKE OMI………………………………………………….. 13

OMI: MEETING THE NEEDS OF OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA, AND



THE UNITED STATES…………………………………………………………………………………. 13

SECTION II – EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND PROGRAM…………………………………… 14

MISSION STATEMENT……………………………………………………………………………………………. 14

EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY……………………………………………………………………………………. 14

TARGETED SCHOOL POPULATIONS – WHO WILL OMI EDUCATE?



(A RIGOROUS, RELEVANT AND ATTAINABLE EDUCATION FOR ALL STUDENTS)... 16

AN EDUCATED PERSON IN THE 21ST CENTURY………………………………………………….. 16

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM OVERVIEW……………………………………………………………….. 17

MIDDLE SCHOOL COURSEWORK………………………………………………………………………. 20

HIGH SCHOOL COURSEWORK………………………………………………………………………….. 20

ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION…………………………………………………………………… 21

CHARACTER EDUCATION/LEADERSHIP/TEAMWORK………………………………………………….. 21

IEP SERVICES……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 22

ACADEMIC SUCCESS CENTER/AFTER-SCHOOL ACADEMIC SUPPORT……………………………… 22

GRADES AND REPORT CARDS…………………………………………………..................................... 23

ACADEMIC PROGRESS REPORTING……………………………………………………………………………. 23

HONOR ROLL…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23

ACADEMIC PROBATION…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 23

ACADEMIC SUPPORT………………………………………………………………………………………………… 24

DAILY/WEEKLY PROGRESS CHECKS…………………………………………………………………………… 24

DIRECTOR OF INSTRUCTION CONFERENCES……………………………………………………………… 24

HOMEWORK…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 24

PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES……………………………………………………………………………… 24

UNIFORMS………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 25

GRADES 6-8: PROMOTION TO THE NEXT LEVEL…………………………………………………………. 25

GRADES 9-12: CREDITS TOWARD HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION………………………………….. 25

SPECIAL SENIOR ELECTIVES……………………………………………………………………………………... 27

PARTICIPATION IN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION……………………………………………………….. 27

C.S.F. AND C.J.S.F……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 27

N.H.S……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 27

HONOR ORGANIZATION…………………………………………………………………………………………… 28

PHILOSOPHY OF THE CITIZENSHIP PROGRAM…………………………………………………………… 28

MERIT AND DEMERIT SYSTEM………………………………………………………………………………….. 29

TECHNOLOGY………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 36

EXTRA AND CO-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES………………………………………………. 36

COMMITMENT TO CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT………………………………………………………….. 36



INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS……………………………………………………………………………….. 37

COMMUNITY-BASED AND SERVICE-BASED LEARNING ……………………………………….. 38

COUNSELING – ACADEMIC AND COLLEGE…………………………………………………………. 38

COUNSELING – PERSONAL AND SOCIAL……………………………………………………………. 39

AT RISK STUDENTS: FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE ACADEMICALLY LOW



ACHIEVING…………………………………………………………………………………………… 39

STUDENTS ACHIEVING ABOVE GRADE LEVEL…………………………………………………….. 40

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS – EQUAL OPPURTUNITY FOR SUCCESS………….. 41

HOME LANGUAGE SURVEY………………………………………………………………………………. 41

CALIFORNIA ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT TEST (“CELDT”) TESTING…….. 41

RECLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES…………………………………………………………………. 41

OVERVIEW OF SERVICES FOR STUDENTS UNDER THE “IDEIA”…………………………… 42

WESTERN ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES ACCREDITATION…………. 44

SECTION III – MEASURABLE STUDENT OUTCOMES AND USES OF DATA…………… 45

KEY SUMMATIVE STUDENT OUTCOME GOALS………………………………………………….. 46

METHODS TO ASSESS STUDENT PROGRESS TOWARD MEETING OUTCOMES….. 48

SUMMARY OF KEY MEASUREMENT METHODS…………………………………………………. 49

EXPECTED SCHOOLWIDE LEARNING RESULTS (ESLRs) AS OUTCOMES…………………………… 50



SECTION IV – GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE………………………………………………………………. 55

NON-PROFIT PUBLIC BENEFIT CORPORATION ……………………………………………………. 55

ASSURANCES…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 55



MANAGERIAL EXPERTISE/EXECUTIVE TEAM………………………………………………………. 55

BOARD OF DIRECTORS ………………………………………………………………………………………. 57

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART……………………………………………………………………………………. 60

PARENTAL INPUT REGARDING THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM…………………………… 61

SECTION V – EMPLOYEE QUALIFICATIONS.............................................................. 63

HIRING PROCESS AND EMPLOYEE QUALIFICATIONS…………………………………………. 63

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: RETENTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF A



HIGHLY QUALIFIED FACULTY…………………………………………………………………….. 65

EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS………………………………………………………. 65

EVALUATION OF EMPLOYEES……………………………………………………………………………… 66

SECTION VI – DESCRIPTION OF EMPLOYEE RIGHTS………………………………………………. 67

EMPLOYEE REPRESENTATION……………………………………………………………………………. 67

RIGHTS OF SCHOOL DISTRICT EMPLOYEES………………………………………………………. 67

RETIREMENT BENEFITS……………………………………………………………………………………… 67

SECTION VII – HEALTH AND SAFETY PROCEDURES……………………………………………….. 68

PROCEDURES FOR BACKGROUND CHECKS…………………………………………………….. 68

ROLE OF STAFF AS MANDATED CHILD ABUSE REPORTERS……………………………….. 68

TB TESTING………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 68

IMMUNIZATIONS…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 68

CPR/FIRST AID TRAINING………………………………………………………………………………………. 68

MEDICATION IN SCHOOL……………………………………………………………………………………….. 68

VISION/HEARING/SCOLIOSIS……………………………………………………………………………….. 69

ORAL HEALTH EXAMINATIONS……………………………………………………………………………… 69

DIABETES………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 69



EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS…………………………………………………………………………. 69

BLOOD BORNE PATHOGENS………………………………………………………………………………… 69

DRUG FREE/ALCOHOL FREE/SMOKE FREE ENVIRONMENT………………………………… 69

INTEGRATED COMPLAINT AND INVESTIGATION PROCEDURE……………………………. 69

COMPREHENSIVE SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICES AND PROCEDURES…………… 70

SCHOOL FACILITY SAFETY…………………………………………………………………………………. 70

ASBESTOS………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 70



SECTION VIII – DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROCESS, OVERSIGHT, REPORTING,

AND RENEWAL…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 71

DISPUTES BETWEEN OMI AND OUSD………………………………………………………………. 71

ACTIONS THAT COULD LEAD TO REVOCATION: CHARTER SCHOOL DUE



PROCESS……………………………………………………………………………………….. 71

DISPUTES NOT LEADING TO REVOCATION: DISPUTE RESOLUTION …..…………. 71

OMI’S UNIFORM COMPLAINT PROCEDURE……………………………………………………….. 72



SECTION IX – STUDENT ADMISSIONS, ATTENDANCE, AND

SUSPENSION/EXPULSION POLICIES.......................................................... 76

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS………………………………………………………………………………. 76

MEANS TO ACHIEVE RACIAL/ETHNIC BALANCE REFLECTIVE OF DISTRICT…………. 77

PUBLIC SCHOOL ATTENDANCE ALTERNATIVES………………………………………………….. 78

PUPIL SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION………………………………………………………………… 78

SECTION X – FINANCIAL PLANNING, BUSINESS MATTERS, REPORTING AND

ACCOUNTABILITY………………………………………………………………………………………………. 86

FISCAL STRENGTH AND SUPPORT…………………………………………………………………….. 86

INSURANCE………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 86



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES………………………………………………………………………………… 87

AUDITS………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 87



BUDGETS ………………………..…………………………………………………………………………………. 88

FINANCIAL REPORTING ………………………………………………………………………………………… 88

SECTION XI – POTENTIAL CIVIL LIABILITY EFFECTS………………………………………………. 89

INTENT………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 89



CIVIL LIABILITY/INSURANCE………………………………………………………………………………….. 89

SECTION XII - CLOSURE PROTOCOL…………………………………………………………………………. 90

SECTION XIII – MISCELLANEOUS……………………………………………………………………………. 92

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES……………………………………………………………………………….. 92

DISTRICT FEE FOR OVERSIGHT…………………………………………………………………………………… 92



MANDATED COSTS……………………………………………………………………………………………… 92

FACILITIES……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 92

PUBLIC RECORDS………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 93

EXTERNAL REPORTING………………………………………………………………………………………………. 93

TRANSPORTATION…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 93

RENEWAL OF CHARTER…………………………………………………………………………………… 93

REVOCATION OF THE CHARTER…………………………………………………………………………………. 94

IMPACT ON CHARTER AUTHORIZER………………………………………………………………………….. 94

TERM OF THE CHARTER……………………………………………………………………………………. 95

SEVERABILITY………………………………………………………………………………………………… 95

ATTACHMENTS………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 95



SECTION XIV – CONCLUSION……………………………………………………………………………………. 96

Index of Legal



REQUIREMENTS

Required Affirmations/Assurances 5

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(A) 14

A description of the educational program of the school, designed,

among other things, to identify those whom the school is attempting

to educate, what it means to be an “educated person” in the 21st

century, and how learning best occurs. The goals identified in that

program shall include the objective of enabling pupils to become self-

motivated, competent, and lifelong learners.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(B) 46

The measurable pupil outcomes identified for use by the charter school. “Pupil outcomes,” for purposes of this part, means the extent to which all pupils of the school demonstrate that they have attained the skills, knowledge, and attitudes specified as goals in the school’s educational program.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(C) 46

The method by which pupil progress in meeting those pupil outcomes

is to be measured.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(D) 57

The governance structure of the school, including, but not limited

to, the process to be followed by the school to ensure parental

involvement.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(E) 64

The qualifications to be met by individuals to be employed by the

school.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(F) 70

The procedures that the school will follow to ensure the health

and safety of pupils and staff. These procedures shall include the

requirement that each employee of the school furnish the school with

a criminal record summary as described in Section 44237.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(G) 76

The means by which the school will achieve a racial and ethnic

balance among its pupils that is reflective of the general population

residing within the territorial jurisdiction of the school district to which

the charter petition is submitted.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(H) 74

Admission requirements, if applicable.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(I) 84

The manner in which annual, independent, financial audits shall

be conducted, which shall employ generally accepted accounting

principles, and the manner in which audit exceptions and deficiencies

shall be resolved to the satisfaction of the chartering authority.
California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(J) 74

The procedures by which pupils can be suspended or expelled.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(K) 67

The manner by which staff members of the charter schools will

be covered by the State Teachers’ Retirement System, the Public

Employees’ Retirement System, or federal social security.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(L) 76

The public school attendance alternatives for pupils residing within

the school district who choose not to attend charter schools.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(M) 69

A description of the rights of any employee of the school district

upon leaving the employment of the school district to work in a

charter school, and of any rights of return to the school district after

employment at a charter school.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(N) 72

The procedures to be followed by the charter school and the entity

granting the charter to resolve disputes relating to provisions of the

charter.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(O) 69

A declaration whether or not the charter school shall be deemed the

exclusive public school employer of the employees of the charter

school for the purposes of the Educational Employment Relations

Act (Chapter 10.7 (commencing with section 3540) of Division 4 of

Title 1 of the Government Code).

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(P) 88

A description of the procedures to be used if the charter school

closes. The procedures shall ensure a final audit of the school

to ensure the disposition of all assets and liabilities of the

charter school, including disposing of any net assets and for the

maintenance and transfer of student records.

Charter School Intent

and Charter REQUIREMENTS

It is the intent of the California Legislature, in enacting the Charter Schools Act of 1992, to provide opportunities for teachers, parents, pupils, and community members to establish and maintain schools that operate independently from the existing school district structure, as a method to accomplish all of the following:


  1. Improve pupil learning.

  2. Increase learning opportunities for all pupils, with special emphasis on expanded learning experiences for pupils identified as academically low achieving.

  3. Encourage the use of different and innovative teaching methods.

  4. Create new professional opportunities for teachers, including the opportunity to be responsible for the learning program at the school-site.

  5. Provide parents and pupils with expanded choices in the types of educational opportunities that are available within the public school system.

  6. Hold the schools established under this part accountable for meeting measurable pupil outcomes, and provide the schools with a method to change from rule-based to performance- based accountability systems.

  7. Provide vigorous competition within the public school system to stimulate continual improvements in all public schools.

The Charter Schools Act (the “Act”) (Education Code §§ 47600 et seq.) requires each charter school to have a “charter” that outlines at least the sixteen (16) mandatory items of the Act. The following provisions of this charter coincide with the requirements of § 47605 of the Act.

As detailed in this Charter, OMI will continue to make important contributions to the legislative goals outlined above. By granting this Charter renewal, OUSD will help fulfill the intent of the Charter Schools Act while providing students with an additional quality public school educational option.

Affirmations /

ASSURANCES

The following affirms that upon renewal, the Charter School:




  • Shall meet all statewide standards and conduct the student assessments required, pursuant to Education Code Sections 60605 and 60851, and any other statewide standards authorized in statute, or student assessments applicable to students in non-charter public schools. [Ref. Education Code Section 47605(c)(1)]




  • Shall be deemed the exclusive public school employer of the employees of Oakland Military Institute for purposes of the Educational Employment Relations Act. [Ref. Education Code Section 47605 (b)(5)(O)]




  • Shall be non-sectarian in its programs, admissions policies, employment practices, and all other operations. [Ref. Education Code Section 47605(d)(1)]




  • Shall not charge tuition. [Ref. Education Code Section 47605(d)(1)]




  • Shall admit all students who wish to attend Oakland Military Institute, and who submit a timely application, unless the Charter School receives a greater number of applications than there are spaces for students, in which case each application will be given equal chance of admission through a public random drawing process. Admission to the Charter School shall not be determined according to the place of residence of the student or his or her parents within the State except in accordance with Education Code Section 47605(d)(2). [Ref. Education Code Section 47605(d)(2)(A)-(B)]




  • Shall not discriminate on the basis of the characteristics listed in Section 220 (actual or perceived disability, gender, nationality, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other characteristic that is contained in the definition of hate crimes set forth in Section 422.55 of the Penal Code or association with an individual who has any of the aforementioned characteristics). [Ref. Education Code Section 47605(d)(1)]




  • Shall adhere to all provisions of federal law related to students with disabilities including, but not limited to, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act of 2004.




  • Shall meet all requirements for employment set forth in applicable provisions of law, including, but not limited to credentials, as necessary. [Ref. Title 5 California Code of Regulations Section 11967.5.1(f)(5)(C)]




  • Shall ensure that teachers in the Charter School hold a Commission on Teacher Credentialing certificate, permit, or other document equivalent to that which a teacher in other public schools are required to hold. As allowed by statute, flexibility will be given to non-core, non-college preparatory teachers. [Ref. California Education Code Section 47605(l)]




  • Shall at all times maintain all necessary and appropriate insurance coverage.




  • Shall, for each fiscal year, offer at a minimum, the number of minutes of instruction per grade level as required by Education Code Section 47612.5(a)(1)(A)-(D).




  • If a pupil is expelled or leaves the Charter School without graduating or completing the school year for any reason, the Charter School shall notify the superintendent of the school district of the pupil’s last known address within 30 days, and shall, upon request, provide that school district with a copy of the cumulative record of the pupil, including a transcript of grades or report card and health information. [Ref. California Education Code Section 47605(d)(3)]




  • Will follow any and all other federal, state, and local laws and regulations that apply to Oakland Military Institute including but not limited to:




  • OMI shall maintain accurate and contemporaneous written records that document all pupil attendance and make these records available for audit and inspection.




  • OMI shall on a regular basis consult with its parents and teachers regarding the Charter School's education programs.




  • OMI shall comply with any jurisdictional limitations to locations of its facilities.




  • OMI shall comply with all laws establishing the minimum and maximum age for public school enrollment.




  • OMI shall comply with all applicable portions of the No Child Left Behind Act.




  • OMI shall comply with the Public Records Act.




  • OMI shall comply with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.




  • OMI shall comply with the Ralph M. Brown Act.




  • OMI shall meet or exceed the legally required minimum of school days.



4 Dec 2013

_______________________________________ ______________________________

Mark Ryan, Ph.D. Lead Petitioner Date

Executive Summary



Oakland Military Institute

Mission

The Oakland Military Institute College Preparatory Academy (OMI) develops leaders of character by providing a rigorous seven-year college preparatory program to promote excellence in the four pillars of academics, leadership, citizenship, and athletics.


Academics

OMI is a college preparatory charter public school serving students in grades six through twelve. OMI provides an engaging and rigorous academic curriculum, focusing on English, math, science, social studies, character education, and the arts. All students will be enrolled in the courses needed to attend the University of California, California State Universities, and the most selective private universities.


Educational Philosophy & Approach

To be an educated person in the 21st century global economy will require a strong post secondary education. OMI believes that virtually all students, not just a few, are capable of a demanding, rigorous and relevant college preparatory high school education that prepares them to succeed in college and life. Learning best occurs in a culture of data-driven assessments and OMI’s instructional methods include a variety of approaches that are research based and consistent with the core values of OMI.


Enrollment

A small school setting with approximately 120 students per grade level, grades 6-12.


Facility

OMI currently holds a long term lease agreement, expiring June 30, 2028, with Oakland Unified School District for a small school site located at 3877 Lusk Street, Oakland, California. OMI has invested over $12 million in site improvements and created a safe and attractive site conducive to learning.


High School

All students in high school (grades 9-12) are enrolled in the course work required for entrance to the University of California, California State University and selective private universities. The curriculum is engaging and rigorous, meeting and exceeding California state standards. It emphasizes science, math, social studies, English, and the arts. It is the expectation of OMI that many students will take Advanced Placement (AP) and/or community college coursework in either the 11th or 12th grades.


Military Tradition

OMI is similar in design and educational program to some of the best public and private military schools in the United States. OMI is a partnership with the California Cadets Corps, California National Guard Youth Programs.

Contact

Web site: omiacademy.org

Email: info@omiacademy.org

Phone: (510) 594-3900


Section I

INTRODUCTION



OMI Makes Important Contributions to Public Education
First and foremost, OMI is an academic institution. The OMI mission is to prepare graduates for successful matriculation at competitive universities. Evidence of our success at preparing academically skilled students for college may be seen in our college acceptance rates. Four-year university acceptances have averaged 75% for the seven OMI graduating classes to date. Many OMI graduates have been accepted to and graduated from very competitive universities such as Yale, UC Berkeley, UCLA, and others. The academic skill level of these students is sound and speaks clearly to the academic preparation of our students.
OMI firmly believes that OMI’s graduates have demonstrated strong academic discipline skills in the core subject areas. OMI’s high school core courses have been deemed UC A-G compliant, a distinction that requires students to meet a rigorous course of study for graduation. OMI’s graduation requirements exceed those of OUSD, and many OMI students successfully complete demanding Advanced Placement and community college courses taught in conjunction with the Peralta Community Colleges. Nearly all OMI seniors graduate each year on time.. Therefore, OMI administration and faculty are confident that OMI graduates, by having to complete successfully the rigorous OMI academic program, are developing strong content area skills.
Teaching military/teambuilding skills is a special emphasis of OMI. By means of a current MOU with the California National Guard Youth Programs Directorate, OMI students receive character education classes each day from qualified National Guard personnel and receive military-style uniforms for free on which they can display the insignia or rank, ribbons and medals recognizing their accomplishments. Each student is assigned to a “company” of cadets upon matriculation. These companies foster teambuilding skills by having the students work together toward group goals. Most of these group goals focus on winning the company competitions held throughout the school year. Cadet companies focus on successfully completing outdoor education experiences, military ceremonies, drill competitions, and parade performances, to name a few. Much of the curriculum within the military science courses is devoted to leadership and teambuilding. The National Guard staff have all received specialized training in character education. They teach responsible leadership, citizenship, community service, physical fitness, military-style drill, outdoor education, and more.
Evidence of OMI’s success in teaching military/teambuilding skills may be seen by the number of successful drill ceremonies held each year, the outstanding success of OMI teams at state-level military competitions, successful outdoor education events, and the close and heated level of competition among the companies each year for the Honor Organization award.
OMI is developing both strong academic discipline skills and leadership/teambuilding skills in our students.

In accordance with the California Charter Schools Act of 1992, as amended, Oakland Military Institute, College Preparatory Academy hereby petitions the Oakland Unified School District (“OUSD” or the “District” or the “School District”) to grant this charter renewal petition for OMI for five years from the date of June 30, 2013 (the “Charter”). (Throughout this Charter, the terms “student” and “pupil” and “cadet” are used interchangeably.)

Offering Improved Academic Performance in Oakland

There is a clear need to improve public education in California and the United States. The need to offer additional high-quality educational choices is equally important in Oakland. OMI offers an additional educational opportunity for students and families in Oakland by providing a school that is:



    • A public school with a specific college preparatory mission.

    • Open to all families/students committed to our mission/educational vision, without tuition or academic entrance requirements.

    • Offering a rigorous academic curriculum to all its students, including English, social studies, math and science.

    • Committed to maintaining high expectations for both academic and personal performance.

    • A small and supportive school environment

    • Providing character and leadership education using a military structure


Currently there is no public school in the Bay Area region that is similar to OMI. The only choices similar to OMI are expensive private schools in other states. OMI serves the larger community by increasing the number of successful college-ready graduates, and the pool of local residents with the high level skills needed by companies in our region and nationally.





California’s NAEP Scores for 4th Grade

Reading Lag Behind Other States



All 4th Grade Students - 2005 NAEP Reading

Average Scale Scores From Highest to Lowest

260

250

240

231

230

220

210

207

200

190

180

Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

2007 by The Education Trust-West

California’s NAEP Scores for 8th Grade

Reading Lag Behind Most States



All 8th Grade Students - 2005 NAEP Reading

280

274

270

260

250

250

240

230

220

Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

2007 by The Education Trust-West


Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

2007 by The Education Trust-West



California’s White 8th Grade Students Trail

Behind Their Peers in Most States



310

300

290

280

270

260

250

240

230

301

White 8th Grade Students - 2005 NAEP Reading

Average Scale Score (White) From Highest to Lowest

264

The Need for Higher Academic Performance in Oakland, in California, and throughout the United States

Oakland Educational Needs

Employers in Oakland need highly educated and capable employees, and the economic viability of our community depends on the availability of this type of highly educated and skilled workforce. Students in Oakland are often less affluent than students as a whole in California. Oakland students fall below the academic performance levels set by the state (proficient) that are needed to be successful in college. In addition, skills of leadership, teamwork, and strong character are essential for developing the best possible citizens for the communities of the East Bay in California.

California Schools Need to Significantly Improve Education Offered to Students

The need for higher achievement and more academic rigor is equally evident at the state level. On the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), California students rank at the bottom. In eighth grade Reading, California students are third from the bottom. This poor performance is not due to the demographics of the state. When demographics are adjusted, California still performs at the bottom, with the same performance level as Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, and New Mexico. The three charts which follow illustrate this poor performance.

California is One of the Poorest Performing States in the United States

The educational achievement of children in the United States as a whole is significantly less than other industrial nations. California students are some of the poorest performing in the nation.

In the California report, The Governor’s Committee on Education Excellence issued the summary report Getting Down to Facts: School Finance and Governance in California in March 2007. This report captures the challenges California faces. The challenges are captured in the following excerpt:

Introduction



On many different measures of achievement, California’s students fall far behind those in other states. As shown in Figure 1, on the 2005 National Assessment of Education Progress, California ranked 7th lowest in eighth grade math in comparison to the 49 other states and the District of Columbia. Perhaps more telling, the average California student is competitive with just the bottom quarter of students in Massachusetts. The story is at least as bad in other subjects. California performed 3rd lowest in reading, ahead of only Hawaii and the District of Columbia, and 2nd lowest in science, ahead of only Mississippi. Some suggest that California’s position simply reflects the large minority populations in the state, but the facts on achievement belie this. California schools do not do well for any group – as an example, a chart similar to Figure 1 only for Hispanic students would place California fourth from the bottom. Significant progress will require fundamental and comprehensive change.”

The Need for Improving Education in the United States

The need for schools that offer students a rich and rigorous college preparation program is critical for the United States, for California, and for Oakland, in order to maintain or regain our competitive standing in an increasingly global economy. For example, on the international level, 19 countries (such as the Netherlands, Belgium and Japan) scored higher than eighth grade students in the United States in mathematics. Compared to key industrialized nations, these same students ranked 11 out of 13. The United States faces similar challenges in science. The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) focuses on the ability of 15-year-olds to apply science knowledge and skills to a variety of materials with a real-life context. On the 2003 PISA, U.S. 15-year-olds scored below the science literacy average of the 29 participating countries.

The United States is Behind Compared to Other Nations

The reports, task forces, and statistics regarding the failure of United States students to be competitive with students from other nations are substantial and compelling. The most recent of these reports, “Comparative Indicators of Education in the United States and Other G-8 Countries: 2006” released in August 2007, illustrates the challenges faced by the United States. The United States spends more money per student for elementary and secondary education than any G-8 industrial nation, yet the academic achievement of students in the United States falls behind that of many countries. For example, the performance in Mathematics Literacy among 15-year-old students on the PISA 2003 assessment defined above; approximately one-quarter of 15-year-old students in the United States scored at or below the lowest proficiency level on the combined mathematics literacy scale. This is a higher proportion of students than in Germany, France, Japan, and Canada. Fifteen-year-old students in the United States generally scored lower, on average, than their peers in the same four G-8 countries on each of the four mathematics literacy subscales: space and shape, change and relationships, quantity, and uncertainty. Although US students were generally at an advantage in terms of socioeconomic status (SES) compared to their G-8 peers, low-SES 15-year-old students in the US were outperformed by their peers in Germany, France, Japan, and Canada in mathematics literacy.

The results of the 2003 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) for eighth grade are no more encouraging. Forty-five countries participated in the assessments at the eighth-grade level. In science, US eighth-graders were outperformed by eighth-grade students in the following eight countries: Singapore, Chinese Taipei, Republic of Korea, Hong Kong SAR, Estonia, Japan, Hungary, and Netherlands. In math, US eighth-graders were outperformed by their peers in 14 countries: Singapore, Republic of Korea, Hong Kong SAR, Chinese Taipei, Japan, Belgium, Netherlands, Estonia, Hungary, Malaysia, Latvia, Russian Federation, Slovak Republic, and Australia.

The Need for Improved Educational Opportunities in Today’s World Demand Innovations like OMI

The global economy has been a demanding reality for nations since the end of World War II. The transformation in the 21st century is that the global economy has progressed beyond a contest between nations, to one where individuals are competing against each other for employment, economic opportunity and economic security. It is in this context that California as a state, and Oakland as a community must strive to ensure the continuing success and prosperity of its citizens. One of the critical keys to international competitiveness is a highly educated workforce. Educating the students living in Oakland and throughout California, so that they excel in academic achievement and are internationally competitive, while also nurturing their development as involved citizens who share our country’s common values, is the daunting task that OMI undertakes.
OMI provides a public school opportunity to address the need for an
educated population of responsible citizens in our community, our state, our country, and our world.
OMI: Meeting the Needs of Oakland, California, and the United States

The OMI Board of Directors along with Jerry Brown (then Mayor of Oakland), as the Founding Group for OMI, proposed the creation of a new, small, academically-rigorous school, OMI, to serve students in grades six through twelve, to be located in Oakland, California, and to use the model of successful military schools by means of partnering with the California National Guard Youth Programs Directorate. After seven years of successfully preparing young people to enter college, OMI is proud of its first seven graduating classes and the high level of four-year college acceptance rates of over 75%. OMI has developed a strong academic program, ranking among the best schools in Oakland, and has developed an important and unique character education component through the military-style Leaders of Character (LOC) courses.

The creation of OMI, with its academic rigor and its commitment to helping students become responsible citizens, is an example of fundamental and comprehensive change in education necessary to meet the 21st century needs of Oakland, California and the United States. As illustrated in the OMI performance report accompanying this charter renewal petition, OMI has made solid progress toward achieving its lofty mission and will continue to strive for educational excellence. Through a rigorous a-g curriculum, a small school environment, and dedicated teachers who hold students to high standards, OMI prepares students to be academically competitive, while also helping them develop as involved and responsible citizens. OMI graduates are prepared for the challenges and rewards available at competitive public and private universities and colleges, and eventually the world of work in a highly competitive global marketplace.



Section II

EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY





A description of the educational program of the school, designed, among other things, to identify those whom the school is attempting to educate, what it means to be an ‘educated person’ in the 21st century, and how learning best occurs. The goals identified in that program shall include the objective of enabling pupils to become self-motivated, competent, and lifelong learners. If the proposed charter school will enroll high school pupils, a description of the manner in which the charter school will inform parents regarding the transferability of courses to other public high schools.  Courses offered by the charter school that are accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges may be considered to be transferable to other public high schools.  If the proposed charter school will enroll high school pupils, information as to the manner in which the charter school will inform parents as to whether each individual course offered by the charter school meets college entrance requirements.  Courses approved by the University of California or the California State University as satisfying their prerequisites for admission may be considered as meeting college entrance requirements for purposes of this clause.

California Education Code § 47605(b)(5)(A)(i-iii)
Mission Statement
The Oakland Military Institute College Preparatory Academy (OMI) develops leaders of character by providing a rigorous seven-year college preparatory program to promote excellence in the four pillars of academics, leadership, citizenship, and athletics.
Educational Philosophy
OMI’s four pillars are ACADEMICS, LEADERSHIP, CITIZENSHIP, and ATHLETICS. Using a military framework, the goal of OMI is to graduate cadets who are capable of meeting the admissions requirements for any college in the nation and who are prepared for their roles as future leaders of character.
The demanding ACADEMIC program consists of language arts, math, science and history, as well as world languages, fine arts, leadership, and physical fitness training. OMI seeks and supports students who have ambition and are ready to take responsibility for their own learning. OMI also offers honors, advanced placement, and college level courses. We also understand that some of our cadets enter OMI performing below grade level, and we require these students to accelerate learning through before school, after school, Saturday and summer academic support programs. Through hard work, determination, and a positive attitude, all students are expected to do whatever it takes to meet OMI’s rigorous academic standards and achieve proficiency on the Common Core State Standards. We partner with parents to communicate about student progress and help all students succeed to the best of their abilities. Parents have a set of duties to fulfill their role as the primary educators of their children.
The military framework of the school develops LEADERSHIP and promotes a sense of pride and community as it requires cadets to wear a proper complete uniform each school day and begin each day with a formation that includes patriotic exercises. All cadets participate as members of the California Cadet Corps, and are assigned to units within a military chain of command (squads, platoons, companies, and battalions within the Corps of OMI Cadets). Cadets assume increased responsibility through various positions of leadership during their tenure at OMI. Each academic classroom uses military protocols and cadet leadership structures to promote good order and discipline. Cadets also learn military customs and courtesies and achieve promotions and awards for their accomplishments. The military dimension of the school promotes patriotic spirit and respect for the democratic ideals of our society.
Cadets learn what is expected of them at the Summer Camp prior to their enrollment at OMI, a camp which thoroughly introduces new students to the CITIZENSHIP expectations of the school. The disciplinary system, patterned after the military model, is fair and predictable. It uses a merit and demerit system that provides both positive and negative consequences. All cadets share a common set of duties they are expected to fulfill as well as a code of honor requiring absolute integrity. Cadets who do not meet our expectations for conduct, integrity, and/or who do not fulfill their duties forfeit their opportunity to attend OMI.
ATHLETICS is an integral part of the total educational experience here at OMI.  OMI cadets are provided frequent opportunities to participate in interscholastic and intramural individual and team athletic development activities and competition. In addition to fulfilling physical fitness goals, being involved in athletics provides cadets with opportunities to develop leadership skills and to learn the ideals of fair play and ethical behavior necessary for competition and cooperation in our society.  It also provides our students with the unique opportunities for self-discipline and self-sacrifice, as well as loyalty to the community, the school, and the team.
Through the four pillars of academics, leadership, citizenship, and athletics, OMI prepares students for successful admission to college, completion of college, and entry into the adult world as leaders of character who make our world a better place, do the right thing, and treat others the way they want to be treated.
OMI CADET CODE OF HONOR
At Oakland Military Institute, cadets learn and behave by a code of conduct that will serve them well during their time at the Institute and long after they have graduated. It is simple, and should govern everything cadets do both on and off campus. Violating the cadet code will lead to disciplinary action and possible dismissal from the Oakland Military Institute.
A CADET IS RESPECTFUL AND WILL NOT LIE, CHEAT, OR STEAL, OR TOLERATE THOSE WHO DO”
TO BE RESPECTFUL is to honor the fundamental infinite dignity and worth of each individual. It means to treat oneself, others, and the property of others the way we would like to be treated. Respect is at the heart of the golden rule, “Do unto others as you would have done unto you.” Cadets do not engage in physical, verbal, or emotional abuse of others. This includes peers, school staff, and members of the community. They do not bully, harass, or intimidate others. They keep their environment clean and free from vandalism.
TO LIE is to make an untrue statement, intending to deceive or produce a false impression. The statement can be oral, written or implied by action. Making a statement that is only half-true, or attempting to give a false impression by leaving out pertinent information is lying.
TO CHEAT is to attempt or to aid in an attempt to gain unfair advantage over others. For instance, using the work of another person as your own is cheating. Likewise, allowing someone else to claim your work as theirs is another form of cheating.
TO STEAL is to knowingly take a property or service, temporarily or permanently, without consent. Taking or borrowing without permission is stealing.
TO TOLERATE is to ignore the dishonorable actions of other cadets. A cadet who knows that another cadet violated the Honor Code has an obligation to report it. A cadet who sees another cadet be disrespectful, lie, cheat or steal and does not report the incident has violated the honor code.

OMI CADET CREED
I am an Oakland Military Institute Cadet. I will always conduct myself to bring credit to my family, country, academy, and corps of cadets.

I am loyal and patriotic. I am the future of the United States of America.

I do not lie, cheat, or steal and will always be accountable for my actions and deeds.

I will work hard to improve my mind and strengthen my body.

I will seek the mantle of leadership and stand prepared to uphold the Constitution of the United States of America.

DUTIES OF AN OMI CADET


  1. Learn and strive for academic excellence

  2. Set goals and work hard to achieve them

  3. Respect oneself and others

  4. Demonstrate integrity and good character

  5. Accept responsibility and the mantle of leadership

  6. Follow instructions

  7. Wear the uniform properly and with pride

  8. Use military courtesy

  9. Care for the OMI campus

  10. Work well as a member of teams

  11. Serve the school and community

  12. Prepare for success in college

  13. Celebrate and take pride in success

  14. Be physically fit and active

  15. Get involved in school activities


DUTIES OF AN OMI PARENT
1. Ensure your child wears the correct and complete uniform daily and complies with all grooming and appearance standards.

2. Promote daily, proper use of the school planner and check homework daily for completeness.

3. Read the entire planner and act upon the weekly parent bulletin. Refer to the school calendar and website often in order to be up-to-date on important OMI events.

4. Be aware of the status of your child’s demerits, attendance, and grades by regularly checking the online parent portal and the planner page with permanent demerit entries.

5. Ensure your child attends school every day on time and only misses class for very serious reasons.

6. Participate in Parent Advisory Council activities and complete required parent service hours, including attending student led conferences, general parent meetings, and other mandatory activities.

7. Praise your child’s achievements and celebrate triumphs.

8. Communicate with teachers when you have questions and respond to contacts from the school.

9. Encourage your child to do the right thing always, treat others with respect, and make OMI a better place.

10. Ensure your child attends and participates fully in academic support classes when assigned and takes those classes seriously.

11. Help your child believe that attending a four year college/university and postsecondary education is desirable and achievable.

12. Communicate through your child’s TAC team any concerns or questions you may have.

13. Ensure your child participates in athletics and other extra-curricular programs, and attend events your child is involved in (athletics, etc).

14. Require your child to adhere to the cadet code of honor at all times.

15. Ensure your child eats the healthy meals/snacks at Café OMI or has healthy food when at school.
Targeted School Populations – Whom does OMI Educate?

(A Rigorous, Relevant and Attainable Education for All Students)

OMI believes that virtually all students, not just a few, are capable of a demanding, rigorous and relevant college preparatory high school education that prepares them to succeed in college. This view is widely shared by educational and political leaders and organizations such as California’s former Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O’Connell. With a clear and focused mission and as a school of choice, OMI provides a clear choice for students and their families. OMI is not a traditional public middle school/high school, and all of our prospective students are urged to consider all their needs and wants in making the decision to study at OMI. OMI is open to all students, including but not limited to, those students with disabilities under both the IDEIA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Students leave OMI prepared for an increasingly competitive global economy, confident that their skills will ensure success in college and the work place.

OMI believes its students have a duty to learn and a duty to lead. Students must be willing to fulfill those duties in order to be accepted and remain at OMI.



OMI’s highest priority is to prepare our students, including students traditionally underserved or underachieving (not meeting their personal potential), so that our graduates are prepared to enter and thrive at the world’s finest universities and colleges if they so choose. OMI’s educational program is based on the educational needs of the following student profile:

  • Students and families who commit to a rigorous college preparatory educational program. Students are accepted on an equal basis, without academic entrance requirements;

  • Students whose academic and personal interests benefit from a small school environment with personalized attention; and understand the value of character development, and

  • Students whose diversity reflects the community.

OMI seeks to educate students in grades six through twelve that reflect the diversity of Oakland. In the 2013-2014 school year, over 76% of OMI students qualified for free or reduced lunch.
An Educated Person in the 21st Century

To be an educated person in the 21st century global economy will require a strong post secondary education. OMI believes that virtually all students, not just a few, are capable of a demanding, rigorous and relevant college preparatory high school education that prepares them to succeed in college and life.
The keys to drawing the best from every student are:


  • High expectations;

  • A rigorous curriculum;

  • Teaching excellence;

  • A small school community, and

  • A commitment to character and leadership education.

An educated person in the 21st century must, above all, be a master of basic skills such as reading, writing and mathematics. In addition, he/she must be skilled in other academic disciplines including science, social science/history, fine arts, and world languages. An educated person must also demonstrate a mature respect for themselves and others; and an educated person needs to develop teamwork skills, leadership/decision-making skills, and habits of good character.


Educational Program Overview

This section of the charter renewal petition provides an overview of the Educational Program that is provided by OMI. The Educational Program Overview, combined with Section IV: MEASURABLE STUDENT OUTCOMES AND USES OF DATA, provides a clear and comprehensive picture of the total educational program that OMI provides.
OMI clarifies the mission statement by means of expected schoolwide learning results (ESLRs). The ESLRs guide programmatic decisions and curricular development.
The following are the Expected Schoolwide Learning Results for the Oakland Military Institute College Preparatory Academy:

Academics

  1. think critically and creatively

a. by solving complex mathematical problems

b. by designing experiments to answer specific questions and engage in scientific inquiry

c. by understanding complex patterns and symbolism in literature and art

d. by applying knowledge to solve real world problems



  1. demonstrate effective oral communication skills

a. by serving as a student leader

b. by employing academic language in effective oral communication

c. by learning another language


  1. write coherent, organized, and grammatically correct compositions

a. by writing effectively in a variety of genres

b. by writing effectively for a variety of audiences

c. by writing effectively for a variety of purposes


  1. read, analyze, and comprehend a wide variety of written materials

a. by acquiring reading proficiency in discipline-centered texts, literature genres, and media genres

b. by developing the academic language demanded by each discipline

c. by evaluating and synthesizing information from a variety of texts


  1. investigate and solve problems through a variety of logical means

a. by using mathematical algorithms effectively

b. by using research and data

c. by using logical argumentation, inference, and deduction to solve problems

d. by utilizing scientific methods and inquiry to solve theoretical and real-world problems



  1. possess sufficient content knowledge to succeed in post-secondary education

a. by achieving content knowledge needed for CAHSEE

b. by acquiring vocabulary and other content knowledge necessary for College entrance exams

c. by meeting the University of California A-G requirements


  1. use a variety of technology resources successfully in academic and real-world settings

a. by acquiring fundamental knowledge and skills of computer software and hardware

b. by evaluating and analyzing internet information


Leadership

  1. work successfully for a greater purpose as a member or leader of a team

a. by sacrificing self-interest for the overall success of the team when needed

b. by ensuring the individual success of each team member

c. by practicing organizational, planning, and leadership skills at the squad, platoon, company, battalion, and regimental levels


  1. envision and set goals

a. by organizing and prioritizing tasks to achieve goals

b. by setting interim objectives

c. by adjusting goals and objectives as appropriate


  1. display confidence and poise

a. by speaking effectively in front of peers and adults

b. by accepting leadership roles within school

c. by reacting responsibly in times of challenge or stress

d. by demonstrating military courtesy


Citizenship

  1. be an honorable person

a. by examining one’s values

b. by having the courage to live by those values

c. by making and keeping commitments

d. by fulfilling the fifteen duties of an OMI cadet



  1. respect yourself and others

a. by being courteous to others

b. by using the appropriate language for school, social, and work environments

c. by recognizing others’ physical and personal space

d. by ensuring your own lifelong physical well-being, health, and fitness.



  1. believe in the core values of justice, moderation, wisdom, patriotism, democracy, and compassion

a. by obeying the cadet creed

b. by encouraging others to live by these values

c. by being a role model for others

d. by valuing the views and cultural backgrounds of others



  1. support the local and greater community of mankind

a. by participating in community service projects

b. by taking action for positive change in the school or local community

c. by developing awareness of the needs of a global society


  1. respect the environment in which we all live

a. by maintaining a safe and clean school campus

b. by participating in various environmentally sound practices such as recycling

c. by participating in environmentally helpful service projects
Athletics


  1. pursue victory with C.L.A.S.S.

a. C = Character

b. L = Leadership

c. A = Attitude

d. S = Scholarship

e. S = Service


  1. work successfully for a greater purpose as a member of a OMI interscholastic or intramural sports team

a. by competing fairly with the highest standards

b. by striving to achieve your personal best

c. by setting individual and team fitness goals

d. by representing OMI in a positive fashion

e. by developing the characteristics of poise, confidence, initiative, self-control, loyalty, sacrifice, cooperation, and hard work
Overview: At OMI, all students are enrolled in core classes that are aligned with California standards. Content standards are used in all classes where California standards exist. Within this framework, teachers develop curriculum strategies and techniques to achieve expected school wide learning results. Teachers are dedicated to continually assessing the curriculum in relation to the standards. Department meetings are often used as a time to align the OMI curriculum ever more effectively with state standards to ensure that all standards are met in all subject areas. Textbooks, supplementary materials, and overall curriculum decisions are made with standards alignment as a top priority.
The high school courses offered at Oakland Military Institute meet the a-g requirements for the California University system. All students at OMI take these courses and if successful, are eligible for admissions into the UC system. The school goes beyond the a-g requirements by offering Peralta Community College courses and AP courses. In addition, all students are enrolled in a rigorous military science program, called Leaders of Character (LOC), in which they learn leadership and teamwork skills. The curriculum of the LOC course complements the overall academic program. Students learn more about organizing themselves, proper study techniques, effective note-taking, and much more. The LOC courses support academic achievement by also demanding that students read more and write more. Many of the standards of other disciplines are echoed and taught in the LOC courses. LOC classes in 11th and 12th grades are UC/CSU “g” elective courses.
The Senior Thesis Project is an independent, research-based project that each student completes as part of OMI’s graduation requirements. The goal is to provide seniors with the challenge of a lengthy and long-term project that will build confidence for college work. Research, reading, and writing practice are all a part of this larger project. By working with a faculty advisor throughout the project, seniors are guided beyond the superficial and toward more important understanding.

Our core classes regularly assess progress toward the California State Content Standards with scheduled benchmark tests at least four times each year and using the CST blueprints as a guide for shaping curriculum. The math department administers weekly skills assessments and the English department does so monthly.


To improve achievement in Math and English/Language Arts, block schedules have been implemented at the middle school level, and many high school students have two periods of English each day. Teachers have expressed their general approval of the “block” math and English classes for middle school students. More effective use of time and more individualized instruction is possible.
We achieve our curricular goals through the use of direct instruction, complex instruction, project-based learning, hands-on learning activities, and a variety of inquiry and lab-based units. We have classroom routines or protocols for various methods of instruction and participation that help guide students’ learning.
Additional academic support is available for students through the Academic Support Program after-school; before school and during lunch tutoring; Saturday School; via the Resource Specialist, and through individual assistance from teachers. The library is available to students at various times both on an assigned basis and a volunteer basis. A system of rules governing a student’s participation in various extracurricular opportunities is based on academic achievement.
Teachers also make a very conscious effort to provide students with the contextual framework or relevance of the curriculum. Additional activities such as field trips or guest lectures also connect the curriculum to the world at large.
A curriculum committee guides the on-going work of curriculum scope and sequence, cross-discipline coordination, and text book decisions.
All students have access to the entire academic program at OMI. Classes are academically heterogeneous and encourage success for each student. OMI is committed to the heterogeneous model both because of the research that clearly supports this approach but also because of the shared belief that students will rise to high expectations. All students must meet the same graduation requirements. The graduation requirements exceed those of the local district. Some students go beyond the stated graduation requirements in math, as well as other subjects. Many take higher level courses and additional language or science courses. All students must take the required military science classes. Some students do excel in particular subjects and choose to enroll in Advanced Placement courses.
Because OMI demands all students meet the same graduation requirements, students’ “personal learning plans” vary little. Students are academically counseled by the Director of Instruction and the College Guidance Counselor each spring as they create their academic schedule for the next year. When students require special academic guidance and planning, the Director of Instruction, the academic support staff, individual teachers, and “round table” Cadet Success Team (CST) meetings with teachers provide specialized guidance and support for students. Frequently, teachers will craft individualized plans for students who are struggling with a particular course.
Students are made aware of OMI’s graduation requirements and their relation to the admission standards of the California universities. In addition to a detailed college guidance handbook, a supportive academic counseling program exists to assist placing students in a post-secondary environment that meets their specific needs. PSAT and SAT prep classes are offered free of charge to all students. Individual students struggling with the CAHSEE or other graduation requirements are counseled and provided extra support and tutoring. Families of seniors are kept closely apprised of their children’s progress toward graduation through special senior parents’ meetings and one-to-one conversations.
OMI is committed to the successful graduation of each student. The academic support program, which is held after school daily, provides struggling students with direct support for any academic need. In addition, OMI provides students with the opportunity to meet graduation requirements through a summer school program.
A strong relationship between institutions of higher learning and our college guidance counselor is necessary to serve our student population. Consistent collaboration with colleges and universities is conducted year round to offer a variety of choices that properly align the student with his or her preference of study and career goal. Financial aid meetings and guidance are provided to students and their families. OMI is also a College Board testing site and hosts other students for these tests.
Perhaps the most important evidence of the school’s commitment to each student graduating is the daily interaction between students and teachers. Teachers provide the time needed by some students to redo assignments, stay after school to finish tests, or work through additional assignments. Lunchtime homework help and other time normally considered “free” time for teachers is often very freely given to assist students with assignments. There is a dedication among all faculty to help students graduate successfully.
OMI is proud to be a part of the California Cadet Corps. The California Cadet Corps was founded on April 5, 1911 by Brigadier General Edwin Alexander Forbes. It is the oldest youth leadership development program of its kind in the United States. Currently, more than 60 schools across California and 6,000 cadets participate in this program, including the Oakland Military Institute College Preparatory Academy. OMI uses the California Cadet Corps curriculum and follows California Cadet Corps regulations. All cadets at OMI are cadets in the California Cadet Corps and participate in the training and activities the Corps sponsors, including a variety of outdoor education programs and training in such subjects as First Aid/CPR, map reading, drill and ceremonies, health and fitness education, character development, patriotic activities, and instruction that supports academic achievement. The California Cadet Corps headquarters conducts Annual General Inspections, and cadets are required to participate actively in the inspection process. In addition, all cadets are encouraged to participate in cadet activities such as drill competitions, bivouacs (camping trips), leadership schools, and rifle matches. OMI has a proud tradition of excellence in California Cadet Corps competition as evidenced by the growing number of trophies, plaques, and awards in the school’s main hallway trophy cases.

Middle School Coursework

OMI currently offers the following courses in the middle school:

6th grade English Language Arts

6th grade English Language Arts (Honors)

7th grade English Language Arts

7th Grade English Language Arts (Honors)

8th Grade Engilsh Language Arts

8th Grade English Language Arts (Honors)

ESL A


ESL B

ESL C


Common Core Math 1 (Foundations for Algebra 1)

Common Core Math 2 (Foundations for Algebra 2)

Common Core Math Honors

Common Core Math 3

Algebra 1 Honors

Algebra 1

Geometry Honors

6th Grade Science

6th Grade Science (Honors)

7th Grade Science

7th Grade Science (Honors)

8th Grade Science

8th Grade Science (Honors)

6th Grade Social Studies

6th Grade Social Studies (Honors)

7th Grade Social Studies

7th Grade Social Studies (Honors)

8th Grade Social Studies

8th Grade Social Studies (Honors)

Leaders of Character 6

Leaders of Character 7

Leaders of Character 8

PE 6

PE 7


PE 8

Music


Marching Band (Middle School)
High School Coursework

        • UC a-g Compliance: The OMI core high school courses have been recognized as UC a-g compliant.

        • Course Catalog: see appendix VI

        • Senior Project: Each senior at OMI must prepare a year-long senior project for review by a panel of faculty toward the end of the school year. The following are the specific requirements of this project. Goals: The OMI Senior Thesis Project demands that each OMI senior explore an academic topic of interest in more depth than might be possible in a traditional class setting. The project encourages practicing scholarship, problem solving, long-term planning, and inquiry. The project demands research, contemplation, and communication of the knowledge learned. Each student should strive to become an authority on his/her topic and clearly support a thesis statement for the topic. Requirements: Each OMI senior will adhere to the Senior Thesis Project schedule. Each senior will be assigned an OMI faculty advisor for the Senior Thesis. Each OMI senior will investigate, research, and compile further knowledge on an approved topic of interest, support a thesis statement, and present the results of the project to his/her advisor. Each senior will receive quarterly and semester grades for the project. This grade will be a part of the student’s overall GPA. OMI Faculty Advisor: Each senior will be assigned a faculty advisor. Each student must meet at regularly scheduled times with the advisor. If a student wishes to change advisors at any point throughout the year, he/she must submit a request in writing to the Director of Instruction explaining why a switch of advisors is justified. The OMI faculty advisor is responsible for helping the student formulate the project plan, advise and assist the student throughout the project process, oversee and grade the student’s progress, and evaluate the final product of the project. The student may seek additional advice from other OMI faculty. Topic Selection: A student should select a topic of an academic nature that fits within the disciplines taught at OMI and will allow the student to demonstrate scholarly pursuit. Topics that do not fit within academic disciplines taught at OMI will be considered but not necessarily approved. The Director of Instruction and the student’s advisor will approve each topic. Final Communication of Knowledge Learned and Assessment: The final product of the project is likely to be a thesis paper. However, other forms of communicating the knowledge that a student has learned may be approved by the advisor. Power Point presentations, oral interviews in front of a panel, or artwork could be approved and considered viable means of communicating the depth and value of the project.

Athletics and Physical Education



        • League Membership: The OMI athletic program is guided by the athletic director and includes interscholastic teams, club sports, and intramural sports. OMI intramural sports pit company teams against each other in a wide variety of games that take place during regularly scheduled PE classes.



        • The OMI interscholastic athletic program is a part of the local Bay Area Conference and play a full schedule of games against both public and private schools throughout the area. Current teams include swimming, track, baseball, softball, volleyball, soccer, and basketball. Middle school soccer, volleyball, flag football and basketball are also offered. OMI demands a higher eligibility standard than does the Bay Area Conference.. Interest in participation is, however, very good. These particular sport offerings may change throughout the future.




        • Physical Education: Physical Education is a yearlong course of general physical education activities of team, lifetime, and individual sports such as tennis, flag football, archery, floor hockey, basketball, soccer, team handball, weight training, table tennis, aerobics, badminton, volleyball, softball, and track and field. Before each class, warm-ups specific to each sport are taught. Each student is evaluated on participation, attitude, and skill tests and/or written tests. Specific preparation for the Fitnessgram components of aerobic capacity, strength, endurance, and flexibility is provided and the Fitnessgram is administered. OMI cadets’ performance on the Fitnessgram is significantly better than the state average.

Character Education/Leadership/Teamwork



        • New Cadet Orientation:

The purpose of the new cadet orientation is to provide a means by which new students at OMI can better assimilate into the culture of the school. Through this orientation, new students develop pride in their school and in becoming a member of their designated military company.
During the summer before a new student matriculates at OMI, he/she must successfully complete the designated summer school/camp/training process. This process may be different for different age students. The summer experience prepares new students in military protocols, procedures, and may include academic preparation.
New students will be assigned to a designated military company. They are not considered full members of the company at that time. Instead, they must continue to learn about OMI and military traditions, procedures, and protocols. The student leaders and the TAC teams will teach these to them. During this time, they may be required to spend time after school (3:30 to 4:30) for practical application. The students will be asked to memorize information and recite what they have learned.
During these weeks of training, new students must demonstrate a willingness to “join” the company, cooperate with student leaders, and participate actively in company routines, sports, and ceremonies. Also during this time, these “pledge” cadets wear their summer camp uniforms.
Only after these “pledges” have successfully joined their company by passing the Cadet Test and Bear Boards are they considered full fledged members of their assigned company and authorized to wear the cadet uniforms.
All new students will be required to attend “Bear Boards.” The Boards take place in front of the company student leaders and assigned TAC team members. Teachers are also invited to witness Boards. Each new student stands in front of his/her review board and completes a set of tasks as a means of proving to the student leaders that he/she is ready to assume the responsibility that comes with being a member of a military company. Each student will be notified within the first few weeks of school what tasks the Board will require of him or her. Tasks include as reciting the OMI Creed, names of student leaders, military protocols, names of administrators, and the like. They may be asked to demonstrate marching techniques and a proper salute.
In addition to the Bear Board, cadets will take the first California Cadet Corps rank promotion test from “candidate” to Cadet. Successful completion of this test is a requirement for acceptance into the company.
If a new student “passes” his/her Board, he/she will be officially inducted into the company and receive all the uniforms of an OMI cadet. If a new student does not pass the Board, he/she will be invited back to a future Board within a few weeks. Cadets who fail to pass their test and board within the first semester are subject to dismissal from OMI.


        • Battalion Organization:

OMI has been assigned the designation as the 49th and 50th Battalions in the 17th Regiment of the California Cadet corps. We are part of the 4th Cadet Training Brigade, which consists of schools in the Sacramento and Bay areas. OMI’s regiment is further subdivided into four cadet companies of approximately 175-180 cadets each and a music company. Companies are subdivided further into platoons corresponding to the class periods in which the cadets receive military science instruction. Each platoon is divided into squads and each of these levels of organization has corresponding cadet leadership positions with increasing responsibility and authority as cadets rise in rank.


        • Student Leadership Positions: Cadets can garner a variety of leadership positions ranging from squad leader (responsible for a group of 5-8 other cadets) to platoon sergeant and platoon leader roles (responsible for approximately 20-25 other cadets) to company level leadership roles (responsible for 125-175 other cadets) to battalion and regimental leadership roles (responsible for the entire Corps of Cadets of 700-800 students).




        • Community Service: Students participate in a variety of community service activites throughout their seven years at OMI. Such participation is recognized with military awards and decorations.


IEP Services

OMI is a member of the El Dorado County Charter SELPA. The current staff of the Special Education department at OMI consists of the following contracted OMI emplolyee: a full time Special Education Director, two full time Educational Specialists, two full time psychologists, two full time instructional assistants, and part time speech/language and DHH providers.


Library/After-School Academic Support

The Academic Support Program provides services to students in need of assistance in order to improve their academic performance. The program consists of After School Support classes, lunch time and after school access to the Library, individual tutoring, and study groups. The program helps to facilitate students in their acquisition of specific academic skill sets (reading, writing, math) that will enhance their overall learning experience in the classroom. In addition, the Library exists to give students a quiet atmosphere, conducive to doing research and/or general academic study. An Expanded Learning Program Coordinator, Program Assistant, and peer tutors are available to help guide each student’s learning experience as needed. In addition, OMI has been the recipient of both ASES and 21st Century Community Learning Center grants to provide expanded learning services before school, after school, weekends, and during the summer.

The Library is open before school, during lunch and after school. The Library includes a computer lab and virtual learning center that are open to all students to do specific computer-based research and for students who need individual help with their homework/class work.

Grades and Report Cards



Grades represent an assessment of the cadet's work and potential for success. They are devices for measuring and reporting progress and achievement. They aid cadets in determining their individual strengths and weaknesses, and they are incentives to greater academic growth. At the close of the first, second, and third quarters, a report card is given to parents in a student-led parent conference. At the end of the school year, report cards are mailed home. Parents are responsible to check the school calendar for progress report/report card issue dates and to ensure that the school registrar has up-to-date home address information. It is up to each family to ensure they have received all report cards and progress reports.
Cadets or parents who have a question regarding a grade first attempt to resolve the problem with the teacher concerned. The request for a grade review must be made in writing within one month of the grade being issued. If the dispute is not resolved, the teacher and/or cadet/parent may appeal to the Director of Instruction who will make the final decision.
Academic Progress Reporting

Report cards are issued 4 times a year, one at the end of each school quarter as designated on the school calendar. Student led parent conferences are held the first three academic quarters and report cards are given to parents at that time. Progress reports are issued 8 times a year, approximately every three weeks. All students are issued a progress report for each class that needs to be reviewed by the parent/guardian. The intention of progress reports is to ensure that all are aware of student progress. It is as important to know when a child is doing well, as well as it is to know where areas of improvement are needed. Progress reports are not mailed home.

Honor Roll

Cadets are named to the Honor Roll if they complete a quarter earning a TOTAL GPA as indicated below in their courses.
High Honors: GPA of 3.5 or better.

Honors: GPA of 3.0 or better.




Academic Probation

Full commitment to academics is mandatory. Students must try their best, pursue a standard of excellence, and ask for teacher help when needed. Any cadet who receives an "F" at any grading period is automatically placed on academic probation. Therefore, it is essential that parents remain active in their child’s education, monitoring grades, speaking with teachers, and taking advantage of academic assistance.


Consequences of academic probation may include any of the following:

  • Conference with the Director of Instruction as requested

  • Required parent – teacher conferences

  • Special mentoring

  • After school or Saturday tutorial

  • Ineligibility for participation in extra curricular activities, non-academic field trips and other activities determined by the Commandant.


Academic Support

A formal Academic Support class may be required as part of assignment to academic probation. Classes generally meet after school and attendance is mandatory. Parents and cadets receive written notification of assignment to Academic Support classes approximately one week after the end of each marking period. Cadets who fail to attend and take seriously Academic Support are subject to disciplinary action.
Daily/Weekly Progress Checks

Daily or weekly progress check forms are available at TAC Teams and the Main Office for cadets whose parents request such checks of attendance, academic progress, and behavior. Such checks can also be required by Cadet Success Teams, the Director of Instruction, the Commandant, or TAC Teams.
Director of Instruction Conferences

It is OMI’s philosophy to provide open lines of communication between parents and the Director of Instruction. However, in an effort to accommodate the needs of the total school population, parents are asked to schedule appointments prior to coming in for a conference with the Director of Instruction. Every effort is made to schedule an appointment as quickly as possible. Parents are encouraged to first speak with a child’s teacher before scheduling a conference with the Director of Instruction.


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