2ba course Outline Booklet 2016 – 2017 Semester 2 Head of Second Year



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Discipline of English,

National University of Ireland,

Galway
2BA
Course Outline

Booklet

2016 – 2017

Semester 2

Head of Second Year:

Dr. Lindsay Reid, Room 515, Third Floor, Tower 1


Second Year Semester 2, 2016-2017
Students are required to choose between:

EN385or EN2133

And

EN264 or EN2142

Plus ONE seminar course
EN385 drama and theatre studies

This course is an introduction to some of the key elements of late nineteenth-century and twentieth-century dramatic writing, dramaturgy and theatre history. We pay special attention to the ways in which meanings are produced by theatre through acting and directional practice, as well as to the various ways in which the theatre functions as a social and cultural institution.  Naturalistic, modernist and postmodernist forms of theatre are considered in relation to a number of case studies.




Venue:

Thursday 12-1 IT250 IT Building, 1st Floor and Thursday 3-4 AC003 Darcy Thompson lecture Theatre


Lecturers:

Prof. Lionel Pilkington and Prof. Patrick Lonergan


Texts:

Students must read the following plays as well as a number of specified readings which will be posted on Blackboard

  • Henrik Ibsen, A Doll’s House (Nick Hern)

  • Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot (Faber and Faber)

  • Harold Pinter, The Homecoming (Faber and Faber)

  • Caryl Churchill, Serious Money (Drama Online)

  • Lucy Prebble, Enron (Drama Online)

  • Howard Brenton #aiww: The Arrest of Ai Weiwei (Drama Online)

  • Lucy Kirkwood, Chimerica (Drama Online)

  • Henrik Ibsen, Hedda Gabler (will also be screened live – attendance optional)




Assessment:

Essay (40%)

End-of-Semester Examination (60%)





EN2133 media, culture, society

This course will provide students with an understanding of our contemporary media environment, with attention to both Irish and international examples. Students will learn about the operation of the media industries, and will gain the ability to critically assess both media texts and the structures that shape them. The materials studied in the module include a number of cinematic works, which will be screened in the evening. Screenings will include The Wire (Season 1, Episode 1), Muide Éire (Cathal Watters, 2012), and The Blind Side (John Lee Hancock, 2009). Lectures on this material will be predicated on students being familiar with the work discussed, either by way of the screenings provided or through independent viewings.


Venue: Wednesday 10-11 AUC-G002 Theatre, Aras Ui Chathail and Thursday 3-4 Kirwan Theatre
Lecturers: Dr. Andrew Ó Baoill, Dr Conn Holohan and Dr Seán Crosson
Texts: Supplementary Reader: Laurie Ouellette (Editor), The Media Studies Reader, Routledge [ISBN: 9780415801256]

Assessment: Essay (40%)

End-of-Semester Examination (60%)


EN264 Studies in medieval literature
Chaucer wrote his famous Canterbury Tales in the 1370s and 1380s and this last great work of his is one of the most exciting and varied in the English language. Obscenity and profanity jostle with piety as twenty-three characters tell tales of fornication, magic, war, love, philosophy, religious devotion and virtue.
The fourteenth-century alliterative poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a striking example of the genre of medieval Arthurian romance. Chivalric worth, testing, temptation, religious devotion, games, and nature are among the themes which permeate this tale of one knight’s quest to uphold the honour and integrity of the Round Table.
In this course you will read two great works of the fourteenth century:


  • Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales

  • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (author’s name unknown)




Venue:

Monday 5-6 O’Flaherty Theatre and Tuesday 3-4 O’Flaherty Theatre


Lecturers:

Dr. Dermot Burns and Dr. Clíodhna Carney


Texts:

Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales: Fifteen Tales and the General Prologue, ed. Glending Olson, 2nd edition (New York and London: W. W. Norton, 2005).

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, W. R. J. Barron, ed., revised edition (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1998)


Assessment: Essay (40%)

End-of-Semester Examination (60%)




EN2142 WORLDS IN REVOLT: ROMANTICISMS

Romanticism represents one of the most important periods of innovation in literary history. As Europe shook in the aftermath of the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution began to transform Britain’s socio-economic landscapes, the Romantics challenged inherited orthodoxies of subject matter, style and creativity. Their writing emphasized the value of imagination and the sublime, childhood, superstition, and taboo subjects of sexuality and violence. This course examines major figures in the movement, c. 1790-1820, including Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Keats and Shelley, and critics and satirists such as Austen and the Anglo-Irish Edgeworth.

Venue: Monday 5-6 AM250 Colm O’hEocha Theatre and Tuesday 3-4 IT250 IT Building
Lecturers: Dr. Muireann O’Cinneide and Dr. Kerry Sinanan
Texts: Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility (1811) (Pref. Oxford UP edition, ed. Kinsley, or Norton, ed. Johnson)

Maria Edgeworth, Belinda (1801) (Pref. Oxford UP edition, ed. Kirkpatrick)

William Godwin, Caleb Williams (1794) (Pref. Oxford UP 2009, ed. Clemit)

Stephen Greenblatt et al., The Norton Anthology of English Literature: Romantic Period, Volume D (2012).


Assessment: Essay (40%)

End-of-Semester Examination (60%)



LIST OF 2BA SEMINARS (SEMESTERS 1 and 2)
Choose ONE each semester

STUDENTS MUST TAKE A DIFFERENT SEMINAR COURSE EACH SEMESTER. STUDENTS MAY NOT TAKE TWO SEMINARS WITH THE SAME COURSE TITLE EVEN IF THE COURSE CODE IS DIFFERENT.


Code


Seminar Title

Semester 2 Venue:

EN278.II

MILTON’S POETRY

Dr. Victoria Brownlee

 

This course focuses on John Milton’s biblical epic Paradise Lost, which tells the story of Adam and Eve, their fall from Eden, and the conflict between Satan and God. The seminar’s primary aim is to facilitate a close reading of Milton’s poem while also referring to seminal critical interpretations. We will explore the poem’s treatment of character and motivation, good and evil, free will, gender, politics, marriage, and literary epic. For the purposes of comparison, we will consider extracts from the King James Bible, and explore how the political, theological, and philosophical contexts of the seventeenth century inform Milton’s reading of the biblical narrative of Genesis.



Assessment: 30% continuous assessment (one oral presentation (10%), and one written assignment (20%)); 70% final essay.


Monday 11-1

Room 302 Tower 1




EN298.II

SPENSER: THE FAERIE QUEENE

Dr. Clíodhna Carney


Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene (1590s) is one those very rare works of art into which a whole culture seems to have been poured. There is everything in it: love, sex, evil, religion, theories of government, philosophy, violence, slavery, perversion. And above all, brilliant poetry. Spenser was looking in two directions: back to the literature of Virgil, and forwards through the political and religious change of his own time into a hypothetical future world. Our class will involve a close reading of Books 1 and 2, and students can bring all sorts of other interests to bear on our discussions: history, science, philosophy, political science, mythology, classics.

Text: Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, ed. A. C. Hamilton, rev. ed. (Longman, 2007).
Assessment: 30% continuous assessment (4 short written assignments: 20% (i.e. 4 x 5%); one panel discussion: 5%, one debate: 5%) and one long end-of-term essay: 70%.


Wednesday 1-3

TB306, Tower 2




EN410.II

JANE AUSTEN

Dr. Muireann O’Cinneide


This seminar explores a selection of the writings of Jane Austen (1775-1817). Austen’s status as one of the best-loved and most critically-admired novelists in English literature can obscure the formative influences and cultural contexts of her work. This module begins with some of Austen’s earliest work, tracing a transition in her narrative voice from parody to satire to a distinctive ironic mode. It then examines how she refined this mode into a powerful tool of ethical commentary, through discussing two of Austen’s most complex and misunderstood mature novels. We will also consider the present-day cultural production of Austen as author through modern cinematic/television adaptations and literary pastiches.

Main Texts: “Love and Freindship” (~1790); “Lady Susan” (~1794); Northanger Abbey (1818); Mansfield Park (1814); Emma (1815). Oxford University Press editions (where possible), esp. the 2008 edition for NA (which includes “LS”).

Assessment: 30% continuous assessment (20% individual presentation and class activities; 10% written assignment(s)); 70% final essay.


Wednesday 3-5

TB306, Tower 2



EN444.II

PAIN AND PLEASURE IN JACOBEAN THEATRE

Prof. Lionel Pilkington


Jacobean drama is well known for its often-spectacular stage explorations of sexual transgression and social punishment. This course considers four of the most famous of these plays, and examines the relationship between theatricality, social order, power and sexual desire. The main emphasis of the course will be on close textual analysis, and to that end a detailed knowledge of all four plays will be essential. As well as class presentations, there will be two short critical essays.
Texts: William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure (Penguin);

John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi  (Nick Hern Books);

Thomas Middleton and John Rowley’s The Changeling (NHB or New Mermaids); John Ford’s ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore (NHB or Revels New Student Edition).
Assessment: 30% for continuous assessment (15% for a short [1000 word max] essay and 15% for general class participation including completion of a one page in-class analysis). 70% for final (2,000 word max) essay.


Thursday 9-11

Room 302 Tower 1



EN2100


CREATIVE WRITING

Mr. Mike McCormack


Please note: This seminar is not available to students of the BA with Creative Writing
Where do we start when writing a piece of fiction – voice, image or character? How do we develop story lines with credible characters? What about endings - how do we recognise them and what is the difference between a good ending and a bad one. Are there experiments and structures we can use to help us along? How necessary is the redrafting process and what is to be gained by it? And finally, when our piece of fiction is finished where do we look to send it. Over ten weeks and by way of prompts, exercises and reading assignments we will explore all these different aspects of fiction writing. Assessment: 30% continuous assessment and 70% for final portfolio


Thursday 9-11

TB306, Tower 2




EN2101


CREATIVE WRITING

"Patrols of the Imagination"

Ms. Siobhan Kane


Please note: This seminar is not available to students of the BA with Creative Writing
This course will provide a context and framework to nourish and enhance students' interest and ability in creative writing, with a mixture of weekly writing exercises and critical readings of notable writers, with a particular focus on the short story, referencing some of the genre's greatest exponents, such as; Edgar Allen Poe, Flannery O' Connor, Raymond Carver, Roald Dahl, James Joyce, Kurt Vonnegut, Alice Munro, William Carlos Williams, Annie Proulx, Kate Chopin, and Ray Bradbury. The course will also touch on a diverse range of novels, creative nonfiction, and poetry, and encourage weekly class discussions around the culture and processes of creative writing.

Assessment: 30% continuous assessment; and 70% final submission - a creative writing project of the student’s choice i.e. a chapter of a novel, some short stories, poems, play, or non-fiction.


Tuesday 1-3

TB306, Tower 2




EN2102


RENAISSANCE DRAMA

Ms. Kirry O’Brien


This course explores four plays, two by William Shakespeare and two by his predecessor Christopher Marlowe. We will examine the development of theatrical drama during this era, and invigilate many of the concerns of the day that were addressed by said theatre: Kingship, power, race, gender etc.

Texts: Christopher Marlowe’s The Jew of Malta and Edward II. William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice and Henry V.



Assessment: 15% for the class presentation write up, 15% for a mid-term minor essay and 70% for the final essay.


Monday 11-1

Room 202, Block S



EN2103


RENAISSANCE DRAMA

Dr. Dermot Burns


This course examines the treatment of love in three of Shakespeare’s plays: Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night and Measure for Measure. The method of study will involve close textual analysis and consideration of a variety of critical approaches to the plays.

Texts: William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night and Measure for Measure.



Assessment: two short essays (15% each) - 30%, one final in-class essay 70%.


Thursday 1-3

TB306 Tower 2



EN2106


SHAKESPEAREAN COMEDIES

Ms. Kirry O’Brien


This seminar will examine, in detail, some examples of Shakespearean Comedy. Shakespeare’s comedies end in marriage: however, many trials and obstacles have to be overcome along the way. We shall explore the complex issues raised on the journey towards a so-called happy ending. Recommended (not obligatory) text: RSC William Shakespeare Complete Works ed. Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen.

Plays: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Measure For Measure.

Assessment: 15% for the class presentation write up, 15% for a minor essay and 70% for the final essay.


Tuesday 11-1

TB306 Tower 2




EN2107


SHAKESPEAREAN COMEDIES

Ms. Kirry O’Brien


This seminar will examine, in detail, some examples of Shakespearean Comedy. Shakespeare’s comedies end in marriage: however, many trials and obstacles have to be overcome along the way. We shall explore the complex issues raised on the journey towards a so-called happy ending. Recommended (not obligatory) text: RSC William Shakespeare Complete Works ed. Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen.

Plays: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Measure For Measure.

Assessment: 15% for the class presentation write up, 15% for a minor essay and 70% for the final essay.

Wednesday 9-11

TB306 Tower 2




EN2120

MEDIA STUDIES

Ms. Bernadette O’Sullivan


Please note: This seminar is not available to students of the BA with Journalism
This Seminar series is an introduction to journalism. Students who engage fully with all aspects of the seminar will begin to develop the knowledge, practical skills and confidence to find their journalistic voice: to generate ideas and research and develop a portfolio of journalistic material. Assessment:  Portfolio of journalistic work: 30% continuous assessment and 70% for final portfolio of articles.


Monday 9-11

AM112,


Arts Millennium Building


ENG201.II

EXPLORING THE CREATIVE ARTS

Ms. Mary McPartlan


This ten-week course aims to offer students of literature and theatre an opportunity to experience other relevant art forms, thereby gaining a valuable broader context for their chosen field of study. Thus,traditional Irish music, old style and contemporary song and dance, one contemporary Irish Film, one contemporary Irish Play and a TG4 documentary will be included, with a view to developing a critical understanding of the creative arts, and the varied forms of cultural expression. The Arts in Action programme will be a compulsory element of study with attendance at three of the workshop- lunchtime performances, follow up class discussion and written reviews.

Valuable resourceTexts:

- Carson, Ciarán, The Pocket Guide to Irish Traditional Music;

- Breathnach, Breandán. Folk Music and Dances of Ireland;

- Hast, Dorothea and Scott, Stanley. Music in Ireland: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture;

- Brennan, Helen. The Story of Irish Dance

- White, Harry, and Barra Boydell, eds. The Encyclopdia of Music in Ireland. 1st ed. Vol. 1&2;

- Mulrooney, Deirdre. Irish Moves: An Illustrated History of Dance and Physical Theatre in Ireland.

Assessment: 30% Continuous assessment and 70% end of term essay of 2,000 words.


Wednesday 11- 1

Room 202, Block S



ENG205.II

OLD ENGLISH I – INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE AND READING

Dr. Frances McCormack


Old English is an exciting and beautiful language. Apart from being an invaluable object of study to those with an interest in etymology, it is the vehicle for some of the most challenging and captivating literature you will ever read.  This course will provide you with a thorough introduction to learning to read Old English without painful memorisation! We’ll think about many important theoretical issues related to engagement with the language and its texts, and we’ll explore the culture of the Anglo-Saxon people. 

Texts: Robert Hasenfratz and Thomas Jambeck’s Reading Old English.



Assessment: Weekly assignments 30% (five assigned, best three chosen); Essays 70% (two short essays assigned, worth 35% each.

Monday 1-3

TB306 Tower 2




ENG213.II

FILM STUDIES

Dr Fiona Bateman


Please note: This seminar is not available to students of the BA with Film Studies
This seminar is an introduction to studying film in an academic context. During the semester students will develop new ways of watching and thinking about films; they will learn how to ‘read’ a film. Issues including genre, intertextuality, narrative and narration will be discussed in class. The films (texts) which students will view and analyse for the course are all Irish, chosen because they share certain thematic characteristics but differ in significant ways.
The films are: Flight of the Doves (1971), Into the West (1992), The Butcher Boy (1997), Mickybo and Me (2006). and Kisses (2008). As we will be focussing on Irish films, this seminar will also address representations of Ireland and Irishness on screen.

Assessment: 3 short assignments (10% each) and 1 essay (70%).


Friday 12-2,

Q1 Huston School of Film & Media




ENG217.II

MEDIA STUDIES

Exploring Journalism

Ms. Bernadette O’Sullivan


Please note: This seminar is not available to students of the BA with Journalism
This Seminar series is an introduction to journalism. Students who engage fully with all aspects of the seminar will begin to develop the knowledge, practical skills and confidence to find their journalistic voice: to generate ideas and research and develop a portfolio of journalistic material. Assessment:  Portfolio of journalistic work: 30% continuous assessment and 70% for final portfolio of articles.


Wednesday 4-6

AM105,


Arts Millennium Building


ENG223.II

SPECIAL THEME

Renaissance Drama

Dr. Dermot Burns


‘Special Theme: Renaissance Drama’ deals with a number of key issues in relation to three plays: King Lear and Macbeth by William Shakespeare, and Gorboduc by Thomas Sackville and Thomas Norton. Excerpts from Romeo and Juliet and a selection of sonnets will also be considered. Close textual analysis of each work will focus on issues including Renaissance values; the Elizabethan and Jacobean world picture; humanism; the development of blank verse; the socio-political climate; personal and political ambition; and superstition.

Required Texts:

Gorboduc by Thomas Sackville and Thomas Norton (available online at: http://www.luminarium.org/renascence-editions/gorboduc.html )

King Lear by William Shakespeare (Norton edition)

Macbeth by William Shakespeare (Norton edition)

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare (excerpts provided on Blackboard)

Selection of Sonnets (provided on Blackboard)



Assessment: 30% continuous assessment (1 mid-term essay) and 70% final in-class essay.


Wednesday 9-11

Room 302 Tower 1




EN2130

SHAKESPEARE ON SCREEN

Dr. Lindsay Reid


What happens when a four-hundred-year-old stage play is adapted for the screen? Why have successive generations of filmmakers so often sought to reinterpret Shakespeare? This seminar is designed for students interested in exploring Shakespeare’s dramatic works alongside selected cinematic adaptations from the silent era to today. Feature-length films under our consideration include Romeo and Juliet (1968), Shakespeare in Love (1998), Kiss Me, Kate (1953), and 10 Things I Hate About You (1999). 

Texts: Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet (Folger); Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew (Folger); a course reader from PrintThat

Assessment: 30% continuous assessment (short writing assignment, library assignment, group presentation) and 70% final essay


Tuesday 9-11

Q1, Huston School of Film and Media

(Block Q,

Earls Island)





EN2145

BALLAD AND SONG IN THE ROMANTIC AGE

Ms. Isabel Corfe


How did the writings of Romantic poets such as Wordsworth and Coleridge reflect their interactions with more popular lyrical forms? By exploring the Romantic canon alongside more popular lyrical poets and anonymous street songs, students will gain a familiarity with the types of literature that Romantic poets were both reacting against, and inspired by. The themes that connected high and low song forms – such as nation, nature, authenticity and politics – will be explored through the lyrical texts themselves as well as through their metatextual materials. The songs and lyrical poems of a variety of writers such as William Blake, Wordsworth, Walter Scott, Thomas Moore and Felicia Hemans will be explored, as will the many street ballads that are available on the Bodleian Ballads Online website. Students will be introduced to a variety of research materials and methods, namely, archival and digital resources and online editions, as well as continue the practice of close-reading primary texts alongside scholarly articles. Using this combination of resources and the study of both canonical and ‘alternative’ literary genres, this course aims to deepen students’ contextual understanding of Romantic literature.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume D: The Romantic Period [ISBN: 978039392720]. Course reader available from Print That.

Assessment: 30% continuous assessment and 70% final essay.


Monday 2-4

IT204, IT Building



(Semester 2)



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