2017 contents introduction 3 key dates 3 choice of topic 3



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ACADEMIC WRITING PROJECT


2017
CONTENTS


1.INTRODUCTION 3

2.KEY DATES 3

3.CHOICE OF TOPIC 3

4.PROBLEM STATEMENT 4

5.EXTENDED OUTLINE 4

6.CONSULTATIONS WITH SUPERVISORS 5

7.RULES CONCERNING DEADLINES AND DATES 5

Change in AWP topic/title and/or supervisor 5

Late submission 5

8.SUBMISSION OF THE ACADEMIC WRITING PROJECT 6

9.FORMAL REQUIREMENTS OF THE ACADEMIC WRITING PROJECT 6

Length 6


Presentation 6

Language and style 7

Binding 7

10.RECOMMENDED STRUCTURE OF THE ACADEMIC WRITING PROJECT 8

APPENDIX 1 A SAMPLE PROBLEM STATEMENT 9

AppeNDIX 2 ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM STATEMENT 10

AppeNDIX 3 ASSESSMENT OF EXTENDED OUTLINE 11

APPENDIX 3 ASSESSMENT OF ACADEMIC WRITING PROJECT 12

APPENDIX 4 ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT 15

  1. INTRODUCTION


This handbook has been written with the purpose of providing detailed information to students concerning their tasks in the Academic Writing Project module, as well as some general guidelines as to the writing of the Project.

  1. KEY DATES


Checklist for the 2016/2017 academic year:



  1. Contact a tutor with whom you can discuss your ideas, and who is available for further consultations. A list of potential supervisors and their preferred topics is available on Moodle. Please note that each supervisor has a quota, and some may decide on a first come first served basis,
    Date: before 12 December 2016




  1. Write the Problem Statement, as provided here in Section 3 below. Submit it via Moodle.
    Deadline: 27 February, 2017, 4 p.m.




  1. Submit your Extended Outline of about 750 words via Moodle.

Deadline: 31 March, 2017, 4 p.m.


  1. Submit your Project to the Student Centre in one spiral-bound copy, and upload it on Moodle.

Deadline: 29 May, 2017, 4 p.m.

  1. CHOICE OF TOPIC


The Academic Writing Project provides an opportunity for students to write a 6000-word paper (argumentative essay) on a topic relevant to their specialisation, which they have thoroughly researched or on a project that they have been actively participating in. More specifically,


  1. A topic/business issue that has recently been covered in the media, or is a currently controversial issue for companies, eg. a currency’s devaluation, the unusual launch of a particular product, a recently emerging HR practice, rising popularity of a tourist destination, etc.

  2. A project that the student has been actively involved in, e.g. most likely during placement or in a family business

The Academic Writing Project is a fully literature-based paper, which explores a business issue/problem/question, rather than presenting recommended action(s) for the problems of a particular organisation.

After the selection of the topic area you can contact a (full-time or part-time) IBS tutor to act as your potential Supervisor. A list of supervisors and their specialised topics are posted on Moodle.



  1. PROBLEM STATEMENT

As the name suggests, a Problem Statement is supposed to outline the business issue that you will address in your paper, as well as to specify the position (=thesis statement) that you will argue for. It should not be longer than 150 words. Deriving from the aim of the AWP, an appropriate academic underpinning must be provided in the form of references to at least three academic sources (i.e. journal articles and books).



The structure of the Problem Statement usually follows a fixed pattern. Each of these elements should be no more than two-three sentences.

  • Outline the topic, provide the broad context

  • State commonly held but incorrect or incomplete assumptions

  • Describe something that reveals how and/or why these assumptions are incomplete or inaccurate

  • Present the consequences of the current situation: what will happen if the assumptions are held

  • Present your thesis statement, the claim that you will argue for, which, in your opinion should replace the current practice.

A sample Problem Statement is available in Appendix 1.
The Problem Statement must be uploaded on Moodle by no later than 16:00 27 February 2017. Note that there is no cut-off date.
Problem Statements are assessed by the supervisors on an Accepted/Accepted with modification/Rejected basis. For assessment details see Appendix 2. The decision will be communicated to the students by 13 March 2017. Should a student’s Problem Statement be rejected, he or she will receive detailed explanation, which should help him or her to rewrite it. In such a case, the new Problem Statement must be submitted via Moodle by 17 March, 2017.

  1. EXTENDED OUTLINE


The purpose of this piece is to present the line of reasoning that you expect to present in the Academic Writing Project. It also provides you with an opportunity to make any change that your Supervisor deems necessary in order to submit a good quality AWP.

The Extended Outline includes the key literature you have identified and lists the arguments and counter-arguments that you intend to present in the thesis It should include the introduction (including the problem statement), the topic sentences of the individual paragraphs (i.e., arguments and counter-arguments, the latter along with their proposed refutation), an indication (in the form of in-text references) of where you are planning to include your sources, and a list of min. 20 academic references (academic journal articles and books) that includes all of the sources (and only those) that you have used in text. (See Section 10 below for the recommended outline.)


The Extended Outline should be a document of about 750 words, and presented via Moodle by 31 March, 2017. You will receive text feedback (no grade) from your Supervisor by 17 April 2017.


If your Extended Outline is below the minimum standard required, your supervisor may deem it a “resit”, and ask you to resubmit. The resubmission deadline is specified by the supervisor in view of the work necessary for revision, but will not be later than 28 April 2017.


  1. CONSULTATIONS WITH SUPERVISORS

In the Problem Statement you will indicate the name of the IBS tutor who you would like to act as your supervisor. Students must have at least three consultations with their supervisors, the purpose of which is to report on progress of work, and to ask for guidance/possible sources/recommendations. Given the nature of the programme, these consultations can be face-to-face, by email or by Skype.




  1. RULES CONCERNING DEADLINES AND DATES




Change in AWP topic/title and/or supervisor


You should request approval from the Module Leader if you want to change your AWP topic and/or title and/or supervisor. Such written requests, providing sufficient explanation for the change, an indication of the new topic/title/supervisor and, if applicable, the new supervisor’s written acceptance, are considered if they are received no later than 31 March 2017. Therefore, you are advised to seriously consider the availability of the necessary resources (books, statistical data, etc.) before submitting the Problem Statement.

Late submission


Students who do not submit either the Problem Statement or the Extended Outline by the above deadlines, or fail to complete any of these tasks shall not be allowed to submit their Academic Writing Project. For such students, the following deadlines will apply:
Choice of supervisor: 18 September 2017

Problem Statement: 2 October 2017

Extended Outline: 13 November 2017

Academic Writing Project: 8 January 2018.




  1. SUBMISSION OF THE ACADEMIC WRITING PROJECT


The Academic Writing Project is to be submitted in one spiral-bound copy, as well as uploaded on Moodle by 16:00 29 May 2017.
The paper is assessed by the student’s Supervisor, using the marking grid in Appendix 3.

  1. FORMAL REQUIREMENTS OF THE ACADEMIC WRITING PROJECT




Length


The length of the Project should be 6,000 +/- 10% words (excluding Table of Contents, References, and any Appendices). The assessment of a Project that is longer or shorter than prescribed will be subject to individual consideration.

Presentation


The Project should be drafted and printed on a computer on one side of A4 size paper. The margins should be set at 2.5 cm at the top, bottom, and right), and cc. 4 cm on the left to allow for binding. 1.5 line spacing should be used (except for long quotations where single spacing is to be used). The recommended font type is Arial in size 12, except in charts, tables, etc. where a smaller size may be appropriate.
The title page (first page inside) should be identical with the front cover, to be followed by the Table of Contents. The contents page should show page numbers for the chapters and the sections, together with a list of appendices.
The pages should be numbered consecutively, including any blank pages, in the top right-hand corner. Traditionally, the title page and the Table of Contents are also numbered but the page numbers are not shown. This means that the first real page of the AWP is page 3 or 4, depending on the length of the Table of Contents.
Each chapter must be started on a new page, and the chapter number (in Arabic numerals) and title clearly indicated. To enable readers to follow the direction of exposition/argument, chapters are usually separated into sections, and sections may be further broken down into sub-sections. The (sub-)sections should be written continuously (not starting them on a new page).
The References section is not a chapter of the thesis, therefore it should not be numbered. For details of referencing, quoting and compiling the References List, see the document on Harvard Style of Referencing available via Moodle.

Language and style


The Project is a piece of academic writing (i.e. not a variety of a business report), therefore it must not be “glossy”: pictures scanned or downloaded from the Internet must only be included if they are appropriately referred to in the text; in other words, if they are functional, rather than serve an aesthetic purpose.
The style of academic writing must be impersonal and objective, rather than subjective, so the use of first person singular (“I”) should be avoided whenever possible.
The names of people/organisations/places etc. are to be spelt consistently and correctly throughout the paper. Standard British or American form of spelling can be used, however, the Project must be consistent in this respect. Spelling and grammatical errors tend to create a rather negative perception of the paper, therefore the text should be at least double-checked for spelling and other mistakes.

Binding


The Academic Writing Project is to be submitted in one spiral-bound copy.

The Project should have a cover page which contains the title in block capitals at top centre, followed by the name of the writer and the words:




ACADEMIC WRITING PROJECT

for BSc (Hons) in

UNIVERSITY OF BUCKINGHAM

and

International Business School – Budapest

2014/2017


  1. RECOMMENDED STRUCTURE OF THE ACADEMIC WRITING PROJECT




  1. Introduction (cc. 600 words)

    1. Problem statement;

    2. Thesis statement;

    3. Outline of the paper.

  2. Literature review (cc. 1800 words)

    1. Definition(s);

    2. Theoretical background.

  3. Topic sentence1

    1. Support1 (Reference)





  4. Counter-argument1

    1. Refutation

  5. Conclusion (cc. 600 words)

    1. Thesis statement;

    2. Summary;

    3. Links with the literature;

    4. Limitations.

References

5 September 2016


Ildikó Polyák

Academic Writing Project Module Leader

Extension 710

ipolyak@ibs-b.hu



APPENDIX 1
A SAMPLE PROBLEM STATEMENT


Student name: PLASTERCAST Jacob

Student programme: BSc in Management with Psychology

Supervisor: Dr DOE Jane

Proposed title of the Academic Writing Project: The Impacts of Expatriation in Central and Eastern Europe

For many years, expatriation practices of multinational corporations (MNCs) have been controversial as they involve improvised selection processes (Mol et al., 2009) and disproportionately high expenses (Stroh et al., 2005). At first glance, expatriation may seem advisable as it helps companies to exert direct control over the operation of subsidiaries, helps to reinforce key corporate values, and facilitates communication between the MNC’s divisions (Pudelko and Tenzer, 2013). This initial perception, however, fails to notice the impact on local talent. While talent management is in the focus of contemporary human resources management, the arbitrary exclusion of host country nationals from consideration for managerial positions may cause more harm to MNCs than benefit. This observation clearly holds true for the Central and Eastern European region, where the situation is particularly pressing (Felker, 2011). The paper will argue that MNCs should follow a global recruitment policy where talent is the key criterion of selection, rather than nationality.

References

Felker, J. A. (2011). Professional development through self-directed expatriation: intentions and outcomes for young, educated Eastern Europeans. International Journal of Training & Development 15 (1), pp. 76-86. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-2419.2010.00369.x.

Mol, S.T., Born, M.P., Willemsen, M.E., Henk, T.V.D.M., and Derous, E. (2009). When selection ratios are high: predicting the expatriation willingness of prospective domestic entry-level job applicants. Human Performance 22, pp. 1-22.

Pudelko, M. and Tenzer, H. (2013). Subsidiary control in Japanese, German and US multinational corporations: direct control from headquarters versus indirect control through expatriation. Asian Business & Management 12 (4), pp. 409-431.

Stroh, L.K., Black, J.S., Mendenhall, M.E., and Gregersen, H.B. (2005). International assignments: an integration of strategy, research, and practice. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

AppeNDIX 2
ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM STATEMENT





Accepted

The problem is related to the student’s specialization AND

The problem as described is suitable for an argumentative paper AND

The Problem Statement contains a clear thesis statement AND

The Problem Statement contains at least three references to academic sources (i.e., books and academic journal articles)




Accepted with modification

The problem as described is too broad to address AND/OR

The Problem Statement contains a thesis statement that needs modification and/or refinement




Rejected

The problem is unrelated to the student’s specialization AND/OR

The problem as described is not suitable for an argumentative paper (i.e. it is fully descriptive) AND/OR

The Problem Statement does not contain any academic references AND/OR

The Problem Statement contains plagiarism





AppeNDIX 3
ASSESSMENT OF EXTENDED OUTLINE



Accepted: appropriate structure, clear line of reasoning, at least 20 references to academic sources (both in the outline and the after-text list)

Accepted with modification: mostly appropriate stucture, some errors in reasoning, at least 10 references to academic sources (both content and format are acceptable after some addition/deletion/reorganisation)

Rejected: no resemblence to sample, largely irrelevant, no line of reasoning, less than 10 references to academic sources (neither the content nor the format is acceptable)

APPENDIX 3
ASSESSMENT OF ACADEMIC WRITING PROJECT








0-39%

40-49%

50-59%

60-69%

70-100%

Understanding of Material (30%)

Misunderstands the basics of the material.

Demonstrates a basic understanding of the material. Counter-arguments are not dealt with.

Demonstrates a general understanding of the material. Counter-arguments are presented, but they are not refuted or their refutation is weak.

Demonstrates a good understanding of the material. Counter-arguments are presented and refuted.

Demonstrates an excellent understanding and critique of the material that provides an excellent refutation of counter-arguments.

Analysis/Synthesis (35%)

The thesis statement does not go beyond simple summary of the source(s).

Presents a focused thesis statement, which may be rather obvious or not analytical.

Presents a focused and analytical but not necessarily challenging thesis statement.

Presents a focused, analytical, and somewhat challenging thesis statement.

Presents a focused, analytical, and challenging thesis statement.




Most of the supporting points are underdeveloped. There are frequent problems in logic/focus.

Some supporting points need further development and/or may digress from the thesis.

Supporting points are developed with details but may be more simplistic and/or their relationship to the thesis could be more explicit.

Most of the supporting points are clearly relevant to the thesis and developed with concrete details.

All supporting points are clearly relevant to the thesis and developed with concrete details.




Evidence of lack of overall understanding of the source(s).

Displays a general understanding of source(s) but may require more synthesis and/or analysis.

Demonstrates a general understanding of the sources and a few intersecting points.

Demonstrates an overall understanding of the sources and some intersecting points.

Demonstrates a good understanding of the sources and most intersecting points.

Source Use (15%)

Source(s) are used without meaningful integration into the text.

Source(s) are sometimes integrated meaningfully and fluently to develop the thesis, with some problematic areas.

Source(s) are mostly integrated meaningfully and fluently to develop the thesis, with some less minor and/or recurring problems.

Source(s) are mostly integrated meaningfully and fluently to develop the thesis, with minor non-recurring problems.

Source(s) are integrated meaningfully and fluently to develop the thesis.




The credibility of several of the sources is questionable. The number of sources used is not sufficient.

Most information comes from credible sources. The number and quality of sources is appropriate.

The majority of the information used comes from credible sources. The number and quality of sources is appropriate.

With one or two exceptions, all information used comes from credible sources. The number and quality of sources is appropriate.

All information used comes from credible sources. The number and quality of sources is appropriate.




Information coming from sources has not been integrated into the discussion.

There are several instances where information coming from sources has not been integrated into the discussion.

There are some instances where information coming from sources has not been integrated into the discussion.

Information from sources is mostly well integrated into discussion, but multiple strategies (quotation, paraphrase, summary) are used.

Information from sources is well integrated into discussion through multiple strategies (quotation, paraphrase, summary).

Structure (10%)

Topic sentences are frequently lacking or unclear.

Topic sentences are sometimes lacking or unclear.

Topic sentences effective but less explicit.

Mostly clear topic sentences relate the topic to the thesis.

Clear topic sentences relate the topic to the thesis.




The paper does not contain an appropriate introduction or conclusion.

The paper contains a basic introduction and conclusion.

The paper contains an appropriate introduction and conclusion.

The paper contains a good introduction and conclusion.

The paper contains an excellent introduction and conclusion.




Little or no logical progression of ideas. Paragraphs arbitrarily ordered.

Organization of material along the lines of descriptive rather than analytic categories.

Paragraphs sometimes could be re-ordered, split or combined, but general progression makes sense.

A mostly clear system or organization is present.

A clear system or organization is present.




Frequent lack of or inappropriate transitions.

Adequate but formulaic transitions.

Mostly frequent and appropriate transitions.

Frequent and mostly appropriate transitions.

Frequent and appropriate transitions.

Language and mechanics (10%)

Most sentences have grammatical problems.

Grammatical errors, but overall demonstrates a general understanding of sentence structure.

Contains a few minor recurring grammatical and sentence structure errors.

Contains only minor grammatical and sentence structure errors.

Few grammatical errors and clear and fluent sentence structure.




Consistent problems in word choice.

Competent but limited vocabulary and problems in word choice.

Uses mostly appropriate and effective vocabulary.

Mostly varied and creative use of vocabulary.

Varied and creative use of vocabulary.




Awkward or non‐idiomatic phrasing often obscures the meaning.

Errors in idiom, but general meaning mostly remains clear.

A few minor recurring language problems, but they rarely obscure meaning.

Minor language problems, but they rarely obscure meaning.

Meaning is clear throughout.




Referencing is inconsistent.

An attempt is made at using Harvard-style referencing.

Major recurring errors in Harvard-style referencing.

Harvard-style referencing is used with a few non-recurring mistakes.

Harvard-style referencing is used correctly and consistently.

If there are one or two differences between in and after-text references, the paper receives 0% on Language and mechanics. If there are more than two differences between in and after-text references, the paper fails automatically on account of poor academic practice.



APPENDIX 4
ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT


Plagiarism, which means presenting another person’s words or ideas as if they were your own, whether deliberately or accidentally, is a serious offence in education and research. It is, therefore vital that you appropriately document the following:

  • Direct quotations,

  • Opinions and judgements of the original author,

  • Facts that are not widely known, or universally accepted,

  • Statistical data.

Whenever you are in doubt whether to reference or not, please consult your supervisor who should be able to aid you.


A student who is suspected of plagiarism will have a hearing in front of a disciplinary committee. If he or she has been found guilty he or she will fail the module, and has to rewrite his or her Academic Writing Project. Moreover, he or she may lose the Honours classification and receive an “unclassified” degree.
The International Business School has strict rules to ensure that students' work for assessment is actually the result of their individual effort, skills and knowledge and has not been produced by means that will give an unfair advantage over other students.
PLAGIARISM
Under the University's regulations students must ensure that any work submitted for assessment is genuinely their own and is not plagiarised (borrowed or copied, without specific acknowledgement, or stolen from other published or unpublished work). If you are quoting actual words from a published or unpublished source - or even from work of your own - you must acknowledge that fact each time you do it by using quotation marks and citing your source in the text of your course work. There are correct academic conventions for how you should do this which you must follow; the Library has a good leaflet on the subject and your tutor can also help you. It is not enough just to list sources in a bibliography at the end of your essay or dissertation if you do not acknowledge the actual quotes in the text. Neither is it acceptable to change some of the words or the order of sentences if, by failing to acknowledge the source properly, you give the impression that it is your own work.
SYNDICATION
You must also take care that, unless you are specifically instructed that a piece of work for assessment is to be produced jointly with other students, the work you submit has been prepared by you alone. If you collude with other students to prepare a piece of work jointly, or copy each other's work, and pass it off as an individual effort, it is syndication and is against the University's regulations. It is also, obviously, against the rules to copy another student's work without his or her knowledge.

PENALTIES


These breaches of regulations are dealt with under the Student Disciplinary Procedure. If the allegation is proved, a penalty, such as the deduction of marks or failure of a module or unit, will be imposed. Severe penalties, such as suspension or expulsion, can be imposed in appropriate cases.

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