10I2 julius caesar english 10: do now 4/22/14



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10I2 JULIUS CAESAR

ENGLISH 10: DO NOW 4/22/14

  • Written Response: have you ever read anything from William Shakespeare? If so, what? What do you know about him or his writing? What problems did students have when trying to read him? Are you excited, scared, nervous, mad etc. about us starting a Shakespeare play? Why?
  • If you have rewritten your essay, turn it in to the US MAIL BOX stapled to the GRADED original. If you sent me the rewrite digitally, then still turn in the graded original.
  • DIDN’T REWRITE? You dun gone loco!
    • Rewrites for partial credit can be turned in by Friday.
  • DIDN’T TURN IN AN ESSAY? You’re irra!
    • Turn one in by FRIDAY for partial credit.

SUCCESS TODAY MEANS 4-22-14

  • You remember the four keys to understanding Shakespeare language.
  • Use technology to efficiently find the modern definitions of some of the more common words in Shakespeare’s writing.
  • Practice a couple common sayings so that you can use them in class Thursday.
  • Use your creativity to create at least 5 Shakespearean insults using the insult generator.
  • Complete the Anticipation guide as a way to start thinking about the issues that will be presented in the play. (Remember how we discussed some big ideas before we read Things Fall Apart?)

KEYS TO UNDERSTANDING SHAKESPEARE

  • Letters, syllables or whole words were sometimes omitted (aka left out)
  • ‘tis= it is; o’er=over: ne’er= never’ oft=often
  • What do you think e’er or e’en means?
  • Syntax (word order) was more flexible.
    • Rewrite this sentence using the same words in five different ways: I ate the sandwich.
  • Shakespeare is 80% poetry, 20% prose, so most of it has to be interpreted as if we are readying a poem. (I.E. expect figurative language, puns, play on words)
  • Keep you list of common words with you as you read.

ENGLISH 10 DO NOW 4-24-14

  • What are the four keys to understanding Shakespeare?
  • Put the following sayings into your own words:
    • What gaulding and fooling is this?
    • Be of good cheer!
    • I care not a groat!

SUCCESS TODAY MEANS 4-24

  • You use some Shakespearean words/phrases organically in conversation at some point in class.
  • You demonstrate your slickness with some Shakespearean insults
  • You share at least one thought about the issues presented in the anticipation guide (aka you talk)
  • You collaborate with your peers in small group to outline a skit you can present on stage tomorrow in class. This might mean taking an educational risk or at least being open enough to communicate with peers to find a fit for you in the skit.

ENGLISH 10 DO NOW 4/25/14

  • Reread the four skit options. Which one are you interested in performing? What is your second choice?
  • Have homework on your desk so I can give you credit. (Anticipation Guide, Tudor Talk worksheet)

SUCCESS TODAY MEANS 4/25

  • You muster all your energy and ENJOY being a lil goofy on stage. Awards will go out to those who come out of their shell today.
  • You, as an audience member, show respect, love and encourage for all our awesome actors!
  • Elite success means you let the themes of these skits marinate in your brain. There are reasons why we acted out these situations… 
  • HW: Write out definitions for Act I vocab. Complete the fill in the blank worksheet
  • Using the images above make a prediction about the role of Brutus in the play… Also add info you already know about Julius Caesar
  • English 10 Do Now 5-2-13
  • What is the difference between a “sole” and a “soul”? What is a cobbler?
  • TEXTBOOKS TODAY and forever!

THE ROMAN EMPIRE

Caesar and Pompey were great friends

  • Caesar and Pompey were great friends
    • Pompey had married Caesar’s daughter
    • These 2 guys helped bring order to Rome’s weakening government
    • They set up what was called “The First Triumvirate” (3 man governing body)
      • The third guy was Crassus
    • Power of Rome and several provinces was not enough for these three, so Caesar left for what is now called The Gallic Wars…
  •                                                  
  •                                                             

THE GALLIC WARS

  • For 8 years, Caesar roamed through Europe, taking over parts of France, Belgium, Holland, Germany, and Switzerland.
  • Caesar amassed enormous sums of money, and he sent the dinare back to Rome, winning over the hearts of the people.
  • In 49 BC, Pompey was fed up with Caesar’s power and the people’s love for him, so he joined sides with the Senate.

According to his enemies, Caesar robbed the Roman public of its liberty and self-respect, since he won their favor with money

  • According to his enemies, Caesar robbed the Roman public of its liberty and self-respect, since he won their favor with money
  • Pompey and the Senate (C’s enemies) ordered that Caesar give up his command
  • Caesar refused, charged into Rome and chased Pompey all the way to Egypt.
  • Pompey was murdered before Caesar got a chance to take revenge
  •                                                                 

Caesar spent time in Egypt with Cleopatra

  • Caesar spent time in Egypt with Cleopatra
  • After this, Caesar went to Spain and crushed Pompey’s son’s army.
  • When Caesar got back, he was absolutely invincible. He was declared dictator, and he appointed his friends to the Senate.
  • He grew so arrogant that he built a statue of himself titled “To the Unconquerable God.”
  •                                                  

AND NOW WE BEGIN OUR STORY…

  • Bring thy books everyday,
  • lest thy desire detentions!
  • Julius Caesar
  • What role might a character like the ones to the left have in this play?
  • A soothsayer is a person who claims to speak sooth: specifically, one who predicts the future or claims to know secrets or other hidden knowledge based on personal, political, spiritual or religious beliefs rather than scientific principles.
  • They are often depicted as blind, at least in one eye, and almost always are ragged - things like fortune telling having been a common trade of the poor and disabled, and other societal outcasts.

FRIENDS

  • 1. Calphurnia, his wife
  • 3. Octavius, his nephew and adopted son
  • 4. Brutus, noblest of Romans
  • 5. The people of Rome!!

FOES

  • 1. The Roman Senate
  • 2. Tribunes Flavius and Marullus
  • 3. Cassius, a jealous patrician and friend of Brutus
  • 4. Other patricians we will meet who will conspire against Caesar

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (1564-1616)

  • By the time he wrote Julius Caesar, in 1599 he may have already completed seven comedies, nine histories, and two tragedies.

JULIUS CAESAR

  • Though the play is a tragedy and not a history, it is one of many plays that Shakespeare based on true events from history.
  • The play involves a conspiracy against Caesar, his murder, and the aftermath.
  • Despite the title and Shakespeare’s usual habit of naming his tragedies after the protagonist, Caesar is NOT the protagonist of the play.

THE PLAY IS SET!

  • The play begins soon after Caesar is named dictator.
  • Remember, Rome is supposed to be a republic!
  • Some Romans were not happy with the arrangement.
  • Roman Theatre

ENGLISH 10: DO NOW 5-3-13

  • Open textbook to Act I to help with Do Now
  • Check your study guide question list. Which questions can we already answer?
  • What does Caesar’s request in lines 6-8 say about his character?
  • What does Antony’s words in lines 9-10 say about his character?
  • 6th pd: Granberry: What does the comment about flying too high mean?

ENGLISH 10 5-3-13

  • Pay Attention to the dynamic between Brutus and Cassius (aka what kind of relationship they seem to have.) We are looking for moments where we can INFER their character types.
  • When reading, have out textbook, modern version packet, study ?s, Character notes organizer

ENGLISH 10 DO NOW:5-6-13

  • First: read everything on this slide
  • Turn in your Do Nows. Name, date, period on every sheet, stapled (5 Do Nows since we started Shakespeare) to the US MAIL BOX.
  • Then, take out a sheet of loose leaf and a writing implement in the ready position to respond to the next slide.

CASSIUS’ CHARACTER:

  • Why is the green eyed- monster slide relevant to Cassius?
  • What themes are being explored here?

USING YOUR QUOTATIONS:

  • Analyse the character of Cassius
  • What persuasive techniques does he use to capture Brutus’ attention? Make a list with quotations
  • Explore the way in which Shakespeare presents the conflict between Cassius’s motive for Caesar’s assassination – is it based on his political ideology or his personal envy?

CAESAR AND CASSIUS

  • L.O.
    • To explore Caesar’s powers of perception and the term ‘prophetic irony’
    • To explore class issues through Casca’s account
  • Foretelling events as if by divine inspiration: casual words that prove prophetic.
  • How might these images relate to the theme of political flattery?
  • Class-Based Discussion
  • In what way does Caesar show his powers of perception?
  • In what way is he ‘blind’ to the danger Cassius poses?
  • Caesar and Cassius

BLANK VERSE AND PROSE

  • L.O.
    • To understand the difference between the use of blank verse and prose
    • To explore Cassius’ response to Casca’s account of Caesar

P.239 BLANK VERSE

  • Lines written in 10 syllables with a repeated pattern of weak and strong beats (iambic and trochaic)
  • To change the tone and rhythm of the lines, he adjusts the pattern

PROSE

  • In some scenes, the lines are written in ordinary sentences but it tends to focus on certain characters or situations
  • Have a quick look at the opening of Act 1 sc.1 and Act 4 sc.3. What do you notice?
  • 1) Cassius‘s response is completely understandable…
  • 2) Cassius’s response is extreme and unnecessary…
  • Write a PEEZE paragraph responding to one of the following two statements…

CASCA’S LANGUAGE

  • in Act 1, Scene 2, in his discussion with Brutus and Cassius, suggest why he uses prose here but blank verse in Act 1, Scene 3?
  • Hated Thoughtful
  • Self-important Respected
  • Ambitious Honourable
  • Claims to be brave Troubled
  • Powerful Shrewd
  • Physically weak Proud
  • Caesar
  • Casca
  • Brutus
  • Cassius
  • Match the characters to the characteristics which they have demonstrated so far in the play…

PLEBIANS AND PATRICIANS

  • L.O.
    • To understand the difference between blank verse and prose and its effect

BRUTUS’ LANGUAGE

BRUTUS

  • Who is he?
  • 2 words to describe him:
  • Friends:
  • Worry:

ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:

  • Who is Brutus?
  • How does he feel at the start of the play?
  • Who does he talk to?
  • What are his reasons for being unsure?
  • How is he persuaded?
  • What reasons does he create to agree with the killing?
  • Examine Brutus’ opening speech and highlight the use of imagery and techniques. What do you notice?

EXAMINE THE FOLLOWING QUOTATIONS:

  • He would be crown'd:  How that might change his nature, there's the question
  • It is the bright day that brings forth the adder; And that craves wary walking.
  • Crown him that, And then, I grant, we put a sting in him, That at his will he may do danger with
  • And therefore think him as a serpent's egg Which, hatch'd, would, as his kind, grow mischievous, And kill him in the shell.
  • Does a ‘climber-upper’ seem threatening by himself?
  • What happens when you link him with a poisonous serpent?
  • What is interesting about the fact that Brutus is walking in his orchard and thinking about breaking an oath? (Consider the biblical reference).
  • How might a person go about recognising the potential for tyranny (a serpent’s egg) and eliminate it before it becomes dangerous?
  • What are the risks of such an approach?

CHICKEN OR THE EGG?

  • How does this relate to Brutus’ dilemma?
  • 1 question I would like to ask…
  • 3 words I will remember are…
  • 2 things I have learned…
  • ‘THE ADDER AND THE LADDER’ : THE REVIEW

ACT 2 SCENE 1

  • L.O
    • To explore Brutus’ use of language using PEEZE
    • Brutus is concerned that Caesar may change if he is given the crown. He refers to Caesar’s ‘nature’ which may change after he receives the crown.
  • What? Did?
  • Which? Could?
  • Who? Would?
  • Where? Might?
  • How? Does?
  • Why ? Will?
  • Create three review questions
  • for your partner to answer based on
  • Act 2, Scene 1, lines 162 – 183.

TASK:

  • Swap books and answer your partner’s questions as fully as you can
  • Discuss your responses as a group and which is the most effective response and why
  • In your groups discuss and rank your ideas!
  • Diamond Nine

DEVELOPING MY DRAMA ROLE

  • L.O.
    • To understand what my role involves and what is expected of me during the performance

PORTIA AND CALPURNIA

  • L.O.
    • To examine the role of the women in the play and how they add to the dramatic impact

CAN YOU REMEMBER THE SIGNS?

  • What is Caesar’s initial reaction to Calphurnia’s plead not to attend the senate that day?
  • How does Calphurnia convince Caesar to do as she wishes?
  • What does Decius say which convinces Caesar that he must go to the senate that day in spite of Calphurnia’s warning? What does this reveal about Caesar?
  • How is superstition linked to the social and historical context of the play? Consider the spiritual beliefs of Romans at this time.

HOW DO THE FEMALE CHARACTERS ADD TO THE SENSE OF FOREBODING? MAKE A LIST OF APPROPRIATE QUOTATIONS

HOW DO THE FEMALE CHARACTERS ADD TO THE SENSE OF FOREBODING? MAKE A LIST OF APPROPRIATE QUOTATIONS

  • P
  • E
  • E
  • Z
  • E
    • Make a point about a female character
    • What is your evidence?
    • Add a detailed explanation discussing the effect on the rest of the play
    • Zoom in on a word if possible and appropriate
    • See if you can develop the explanation further

THE MURDER SCENE

  • L.O.
    • To be able to look at Caesar’s role before he dies
    • To explore Caesar’s role in the play

CAESAR’S CHARACTER

  • Look at the following vocabulary and make sure you are able to define each word
  • Are these characteristics a true reflection of Caesar’s character?
  • Do you disagree with any and can you find the evidence?
  • Stubborn
  • Constant
  • Pragmatic
  • Changeable
  • Steadfast
  • ‘…I am constant as the northern star…’ Julius Caesar

LIGHT IMAGERY – CAESAR’S SPEECH PAGE 113

  • Why is it important that light imagery is used by Caesar at this point in the play?
  • What does it reveal about his character?

LOOK AT THE FOLLOWING PICTURES:

  • Explore the pictures and think about how they have imagined the death of Caesar
  • Do you notice any patterns?

VIDEO:

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FvgP5hO99o
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Je0gTnheVe4&feature=related
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9H-Kztt6WpM

PLENARY:

  • What role has Julius Caesar played in the play so far?
  • What surprises you about his early death considering the play is called ‘Julius Caesar’?

ANTONY’S REACTION

  • L.O.
    • To be able to examine Antony’s role in the play and his immediate reaction
    • To take part in a drama task to explore Caesar’s assassination
  • ANTONY’S REACTION

ANTONY’S SPEECH

  • Work in small groups to read out Antony’s speech to show his anger at what has happened
  • What words would you focus on?
  • ‘I am meek and gentle with these butchers…’
  • ‘Domestic fury, and fierce civil strife shall cumber all the parts of Italy…’
  • ‘And dreadful objects so familiar, That mothers shall but smile when they behold Their infants quartered with the hands of war; all pity choked…’
  • ‘…And Caesar’s spirit ranging for revenge, With Ate by his side come hot from hell…’

PEEZE

  • Select one quotation and write a PEEZE paragraph to explore how Antony may feel at the death of his friend
  • Why is it important for the conspirators to get Antony out of the way?
  • What do Caesar’s last words tell us about his feelings for Brutus?
  • How is the action of lines 105-107 connected with Calphurnia?
  • Through which character does Shakespeare warn the audience that Antony could mean trouble for the conspirators?
  • What does Antony really think of the conspirators?
  • Do you think Octavius’ arrival signals good news or bad news of the conspirators? Why?
  • Elizabethan Audience’s Reaction to Antony’s soliloquy?
  • Modern Audience’s Response to Antony’s soliloquy?
  • Rhetorical Questions…
  • Emotive Language…
  • Opposites…
  • Repetition…
  • ‘Who is here so base, that would be a bondman…?’
  • ‘…I loved Rome more…’
  • ‘Had you rather Caesar were living, and die all slaves…’
  • ‘…Who is here so base?’
  • ‘…Who is here so rude?’
  • Rhetorical Questions…
  • Emotive Language…
  • Opposites…
  • Repetition…
  • ‘Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?’
  • ‘My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar…’
  • ‘The evil that men do lives after them, The good is oft interred with their bones…’
  • ‘And Brutus is an honourable man…’
  • Summarise last lesson in 18 words
  • OR
  • Unscramble the following anagrams they are key words for today’ s lesson and will help you think about our learning objectives:
  • niimabto
  • launhoorbe
  • shapto
  • Get Thinking . . .
  • Venn Diagram: Brutus and Antony’s Speeches
  • How does Mark Antony feel about Caesar’s assassination?
  • What words does he use to express his feelings?
  • How do you think he would have delivered his speech? Consider his tone of voice, mood and attitude.
  • Note the order of the speech – do you think he might at any point: whisper, cry or yell?
  • What impact does the speech have on the crowd?
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/drama/activities/still_image/still_image.shtml
  • A still image is a freeze-frame of a particularly dramatic moment in a performance. Using levels, posture, facial expressions and body language the actors can communicate a great deal to the audience about what has taken place without having to move or speak. See the example in this short clip.

CROSS-CUTTING

  • is an dramatic technique most often used to establish action occurring at the same time in two different locations. In a cross-cut, the audience’s focus will move away from one action to another action, which can suggest the simultaneity of these two actions. Suspense may be added by cross-cutting. It is built through the expectations that it creates and in the hopes that it will be explained with time. Cross-cutting also forms parallels; it illustrates a narrative action that happens in several places at approximately the same time.
  • Read lines 9-12. What is Brutus accusing Cassius of?
  • Read lines 18-28. What does this speech reveal to you about Brutus’s character and his motive for killing Caesar? (PEE)
  • Read lines 42-49. Put yourself in Cassius’s shoes. How might Brutus’s words here make you even more angry? (Think of a time when you were really angry and someone laughed at you for it. How did it make you feel?)
  • Read lines 65-83. Which famous fictional character can you compare Brutus to based upon this speech? Give reasons for your choice.
  • Read lines 100-107. Compare the ways in which an Elizabethan and a modern audience might react to this speech.
  • Cassius’ past behaviour
  • Cassius’ present attitude
  • Portia’s death
  • Cassius’ accusations
  • the poet’s interruption
  • news of the death of 100 senators
  • news of the approaching armies
  • Caesar’s ghost
  • a feeling of evil to come
  • an unfavourable omen
  • fateful: ominously prophetic
  • A balloon debate is a debate in which a number of speakers attempt to win the approval of an audience.
  • The audience is invited to imagine that the speakers are flying in a hot-air balloon which is sinking and that someone must be thrown out if everyone is not to die.
  • Each speaker has to make the case why they should not be thrown out of the balloon to save the remainder.
  • Who should go overboard:
  • Antony?
  • Cassius?
  • Brutus?
  • Using the ‘plot at a glance’ reference on page 228, complete a tension graph for the plot of ‘Julius Caesar’.


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