Year 10 English (2015)



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Year 10 English (2015)

By the end of Year 10 students, supported by the opportunity for independent reading, listen to, read and view a range of spoken, written and multimodal texts. These texts include Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including Asian texts.



Yr. 10 students can, via selected textual evidence, explain, evaluate, contrast and compare print and visual texts in terms of ideas (readings) and conventions. They can understand and use for interpretation the denotative and connotative levels of language. They can also discuss the relationship between text and context and audience, participate effectively in group discussion and oral presentations in which they demonstrate ability with appreciation and evaluation of texts in terms of ideas and conventions; vary vocabulary choices and sentence and clause structures for impact; correctly use appropriate punctuation when creating complex sentences and complex texts for formal purposes and create texts to demonstrate appreciation and understanding.

Week

Teaching Focus

Syllabus Content

Assessment Tasks

1

  • Unit overview

  • Task expectations; explicit teaching journal; links to OLNA testing

  • Written, writing and speaking standards

  • Letter Grades – referenced to Grade Descriptors, not numbers

  • Rationale – essential English reading, writing and speaking skill; links to OLNA testing

  • Grade Descriptions; key to ranking rather than a number

  • Explicit Teaching Journal

  • Exam structure

Learning Journal – key concepts notes (Upper School glossary); samples of studied text notes; short and extended practice responses to texts.

Initial Journal activity – suggestion: narrative or persuasive writing to a visual stimulus; short response (350-400 words); in-class feedback.

2-5

  • Literary texts – short story, poetry and drama

  • Close analysis of link between narrative conventions in at least one short story and other literary texts such as a selection of poetry or some drama extracts

  • Concept of representation – applied to studied literary texts

  • Concept of context

  • Concept of voice

Literature and Context:

  • How texts reflect the context of culture and situation in which they are created

  • Compare and evaluate a range of representations of individuals and groups in different historical, social and cultural contexts

  • The key features of literary texts and how they work to construct a literary work, such as plot, setting, characterization, mood and theme

  • Compare and evaluate how ‘voice’ as a literary device can be used in a range of different types of texts such as poetry to evoke particular emotional responses

  • Analyze and evaluate text structures and language features of literary texts and make relevant thematic and intertextual connections with other texts

Task 1: Response (7%)

(Set Week 1, due Week 4)

Write an essay or article that explains, with examples, how an idea is represented in a short story or a poem you have studied.

Journal: Sample and practice responses to studied texts – short answer format; in-class feedback.


6-9

Compare how a variety of expository texts promote ideas in different contexts; includes but not exclusive to articles, speeches, advertisements, posters, documentary, extracts from TV panel shows.

Explore what the word “compare” means when comparing texts in terms of ideas and how they are represented.



  • Language Variation and Change

  • How English varies according to context and purpose including cultural and historical contexts

  • How texts serve different purposes and how the structures of types of texts vary according to the text purpose

  • How texts work as cohesive wholes through language features which link the parts of the text together, such as paragraphs, connectives, nouns and associated pronouns

  • Compare the purposes, text structures and language features of traditional and contemporary texts in different media

  • How images work in texts to communicate meanings, especially in conjunction with other elements such as print and sound

  • Creating different types of spoken, written and multimodal texts using knowledge of text structures and language features

  • Review, edit and refine students’ own and others’ texts for control of content, organisation, sentence structure, vocabulary, and/or visual features, to achieve particular purposes and effects

Task 2: Production (7%)

(Set Week 5, due Week9)

Produce a bi modal text that represents in a particular way an idea in a text you have studied. Include a 200- 250 word explanation.

Journal – sample/practice at particular representations of ideas from studied texts.

10-14

Read an extended narrative text – novel, drama, group of short stories and look for representations of ideas, people, institutions

Focus on representation of concepts, social groups, and institutions.

Read short story, a selection of poetry, and a selection of images to allow comparison


  • Compare and evaluate a range of representations of individuals and groups in different historical, social and cultural contexts

  • Texts and the contexts in which they are used -

How texts relate to their contexts and reflect the society and culture in which they were created

  • Oral presentations - the formal oral presentations that students engage in including presenting recounts and information, and presenting and arguing a point of view

  • Using a range of software applications to construct and edit print and multimodal texts

Task 3: Oral response (7%)

(Set Week 9, due Week 13-14

Present a bi-modal presentation that compares the differences in representations of the same social group or institution in two texts; students select their own representations from texts studied or texts selected from their own independent reading/viewing.
Journal – notes on texts studied; practice responses to different types of representation – social groups, institutions, landscapes or concepts.


14-15

Apply knowledge of different text forms and conventions that represent ideas or perspectives in particular ways and shape audience response; include but not exclusive to poetry, narrative, article, speech, images.

Create a range of texts:

  • Use appropriate form, content, style and tone for different purposes, audiences and contexts

  • Use evidence-based argument

  • Use appropriate quotation and reference protocols

Use planning and proof-reading strategies.

Task 4: Production (7%)

(Set Week 9, due Week 15)



Produce a text that represents an idea, object, social group or concept in a particular way; write a Statement of Intent on the cover page.


16

Exam structure – short response format; differences between sections

Exam strategies – how to respond effectively in the exam context.

Journal – notes on exam structure; practice responses in short-answer format.
Task 5: Explicit Teaching Journal (7%) – see suggested assessment strategy.

17

Examination

Essential content; studied texts; representation; writing effectively in different forms to different stimuli

Task 6: Exam (15%)

Exam – tests reading and viewing concepts and studied texts.

18-19

Differences between narrative and expository texts in terms of conventions and how ideas are promoted.

Present a short narrative (revision text) and an expository text (revision) and allow groups to determine comparison strategies.



  • Different texts types represent ideas differently and reflect different contexts

Task7: Response (7%)

(Set Week 18, due Week 21 – Country Week package)

Write an essay which compares the differences in how the main idea is introduced in a narrative and an expository text presented for study.

20

Country Week -







21-24

Links between a text’s construction, the ideas represented, the audience and the context.

Examples include but not exclusive to speech, article, extended expository text, chapter extracts from large expository texts.




  • Purpose audience and structures of different types of texts - How texts serve different purposes and how the structures of types of texts vary according to the text purpose

  • Creating different types of spoken, written and multimodal texts using knowledge of text structures and language features

  • Editing texts for meaning, structure and grammatical features

  • Create sustained texts, including texts that combine specific digital or media content, for imaginative, informative, or persuasive purposes, and that reflect upon challenging and complex issues

Task 8: Production (7%)

(Set Week 21, due Week 24)

Write an expository text that uses particular structural and convention features to comment on an issue important to a particular audience; write a Statement of Intent on the cover page.


25-31

Study an extended text (film, documentary, TV series, novel, play (The Shifting Heart), computer games, bio/auto biography, book-length expository, novel)

Exploration of link between text and context.

Research strategies for student selected texts.

Revise a selection of traditional fairy tales and fables.



  • How texts relate to their contexts and reflect the society and culture in which they were created

  • How texts serve different purposes and how the structures of types of texts vary according to the text purpose

  • Evaluate the impact on audiences of different choices in the representation of still and moving images

  • How language used for different formal and informal social interactions is influenced by the purpose and audience

  • Expressing a personal preference for different texts and types of texts, and identifying the features of texts that influence personal preference

  • Recognizing and analyzing differences between different types of texts

  • Create imaginative texts that make relevant thematic and intertextual connections with other texts

Task 9: Oral Response (7%)

(Set Week 25, due Week 29-30)

Explore the relationship between text and context by researching the context of a text you have studied.
Task 10: Production (7%)

(Set Week 25, due Week 29-30)

Rewrite (modernise) a fairy tale or fable that makes a comment on contemporary Australian society.
Task 11: Explicit Teaching Journal (7%)

(Due Week 31)

Teacher initiated within a common framework – see Semester 1.



32

Revision

Exam strategies and response structures




34

Examination Timetable

Check counselling/upper school course link for each student.

Task12: Exam (15%)

Exam – tests reading and viewing concepts and studied texts.


35-40

Active teaching program on Upper School courses – ATAR ENG or LIT or GENERAL

Essential concepts and assessment structures.

Summer Program –Preparation for Upper School courses

Response workshops referenced to narrative, expository and visual texts; practice for ATARENG or LIT exam format or the GENERAL EST task; home feedback via email/phone/signed work.


BSHS Year 10 ENG Outline -



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