Writing a Persuasive Essay Higher Folio Contents



Download 84,92 Kb.
Page1/9
Date conversion20.11.2016
Size84,92 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9

Writing a Persuasive Essay Higher Folio

Contents

  • 1) Getting Started
  • A) Facts and Opinions
  • B) What issue should I write about?
  • C) Steps towards creating a Persuasive essay
  • 2) Types of Evidence
  • A) Using Anecdotal Evidence
  • B) Using Facts
  • C) Using Statistics
  • D) Using Someone's Opinion
  • 3) Research and Note taking advice
  • 4) Creating a Catchy Title
  • 5) Suggested Essay Structure
  • 6) Writing your Introduction
  • A) Playlet Introduction
  • B) Banner Headline Introduction
  • C) Vox Pops Quote Introduction
  • D) Statistical Introduction
  • E) Emotive Introduction
  • F) Anecdotal Introduction

Contents

  • 7) Making your Argument
  • 1) Forms of Evidence
  • 2) Recommended Structure
  • 3) Rebutting Counter Arguments
  • 8) Using Techniques
  • General Approaches
  • i) Take ownership
  • ii) Provide information on the history of your issue
  • iii) Provide information on the geography of your issue
  • Specific Techniques
  • 1) Use a Rhetorical Question
  • 2) Use Statistics
  • 3) Use Personal Experience
  • 4) Use the Language of Persuasion
  • 5) Ask a question and answer it
  • 6) Use Emotive Language
  • 7) Set out quotations correctly
  • 8) Repetition
  • 9) Create Flow (Link Words)
  • 10) Using a one sentence paragraph to finish
  • 11) Link conclusion to the introduction
  • 12) Finish with a quotation

1) Getting Started

  • CONTENTS

Introduction

  • When you write a Persuasive essay you form arguments and present them for or against an issue.
  • You have a strong personal stance and aim to persuade the reader that your view on the issue can be fully supported.
  • It is important, however, to be clear about the difference in writing a Persuasive essay, as outlined above, and in writing a Discursive essay (sometimes called Argumentative Writing)

Difference between Discursive and Persuasive

  • In writing a Discursive essay the writer examines both sides of an issue in a balanced way, without a clear personal stance and (usually) in a formal neutral tone.
  • In a Persuasive essay the emphasis is on a more personal, more emotional way of writing.
  • This is why in a Persuasive essay you are encouraged to use techniques. Techniques help convey emotion.
  • Think of your essay as 50% argument and 50% emotion. This should help you write an effective essay.
  • Please note that each type of essay has its own individual structure.

FACTS AND OPINIONS

  • CONTENTS

FACTS AND OPINIONS

  • When you write your persuasive essay you will be writing both facts and opinions so it is important to know the difference between the two.
  •  
  • Facts are things known for certain to be true. 
  • The following are facts:
  • •  Edinburgh is the capital of Scotland.
  • •  The main character of J K Rowling's novels is Harry Potter.
  • Opinions are things believed to be true.
  • The following are opinions:
  • •  Edinburgh is a great city.
  • •  J K Rowling is the greatest living novelist.

Continued…

  • These are opinions and not facts because facts are true regardless of people's view.
  • For example, a  person living in Edinburgh may not consider it to be "great", and many people prefer other writers to J K Rowling despite her huge success.
  • In a convincing persuasive essay opinions are supported by facts. This makes an argument.

What issue should I write about?

  • CONTENTS

What issue should I write about?

  • Before you can choose your issue you have to think about your own opinions.
  • The list below shows you the kind of issue students have written about in recent years:
  • the war in Afghanistan, voting at 16, size zero modelling, abortion, Scottish Independence, downloading music on the internet, film classification, testing cosmetics on animals.
  • Choose an issue that you genuinely feel strongly about. This can help your writing.

Issue Types

  • Your choice could be about:
  • •  an international issue (...Third World poverty)
  • •  a national issue (...student fees at universities)
  • •  a local issue (..the building of a new bridge over the Forth) 
  • •  a personal issue (...your school should be given better facilities)
  • Once you have decided on the issue to write about you have to form arguments which you use to present your case.
  •   →  some issues overlap in categories, for example, a local issue could also be a national issue

Exemplar

  • In this PowerPoint, whenever we look at the idea of persuasive writing, we will do this in the context of a student who is arguing the issue that the tax on tobacco should be increased.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page