Why is it so difficult You try one … Pick a question



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Why is it so difficult??

You try one … Pick a question

  • What struggles might students have with this
  • essay question?

Examples of Key Action Words

  • Compare
  • To show how two or more things are the same or similar.
  • “Compare rap and hip-hop.”
  • Contrast
  • To show how two or more things are different.
  • “Contrast socialism and capitalism.”
  • Critique/Criticize
  • To point out both the good points and bad points of something.
  • “Critique the public welfare system.”

Examples of Key Action Words

  • Define
  • To give a clear meaning of something. This usually involves naming the class it belongs to and how it is different from other things in that class.
  • “Define the term ‘mammal.’”
  • Describe
  • To provide a “word picture” of something.
  • “Describe the events related to the Alamo.”

Examples of Key Action Words

  • Diagram
  • To organize information in a pictorial or graphic manner, such as a chart, table, map, or diagram.
  • “Diagram the water cycle.”
  • Discuss
  • To write about all sides or points of view related to an issue.
  • This may include writing about the advantages and
  • disadvantages of something.
  • “Discuss environmental issues related to the timber industry.”

Examples of Key Action Words

  • Evaluate
  • To make a value judgment (positive or negative)
  • based on facts or evidence.
  • “Evaluate the overall impact of the welfare system.”
  • Justify
  • To argue in writing why something is good or bad.
  • This involves giving reasons for why something is good or bad and/or writing about the advantages and disadvantages of something.
  • “What is your position on capital punishment? Justify your position.”

Examples of Key Action Words

  • List
  • To write sentences about specific elements or examples.
  • This sometimes requires some form of order or sequencing.
  • “List the stages of butterfly metamorphosis.”
  • Summarize
  • To present the main ideas of an issue or topic in a shortened way by providing a few examples or details.
  • “Summarize the steps of the Essay Test-Taking Strategy.”

Example Essay Questions

  • Describe the inside of the eye. Be sure to include all five major parts in your description
  • List at least three types of pollution. Select one of the types and describe it.
  • Choose two literary styles and contrast them.
  • Are you warm-blooded or cold-blooded? Explain what that means.

Example Essay Questions

  • Select one of the following simple machines (pulley, lever, or wheel), and write how you would explain it to a first-grade student.
  • Consider these two contrasting statements: “Look before you leap” and “He who hesitates is lost.” Select the one you believe to be generally the best advice. Persuade the reader by using an example from your own life as well as an example from historical or current events.

Example Essay Questions

  • Select one of the following simple machines (pulley, lever, or wheel), and write how you would explain it to a first-grade student.
  • Consider these two contrasting statements: “Look before you leap” and “He who hesitates is lost.” Select the one you believe to be generally the best advice. Persuade the reader by using an example from your own life as well as an example from historical or current events.

Turn to a partner and list some

  • S
  • C
  • A
  • N

Step 2: Notice the Requirements

  • Scan and mark
  • Change it into your own words (Paraphrase)
  • Arrange the times
  • Name your goal

Scan and Mark

  • This means that you look for and mark the question’s requirements
    • Draw 2 lines under each requirement
    • For every action word you underline, you will probably underline at least 1 requirement

Change it into Your Own Words

  • This means that you paraphrase the question into your own words
    • Paraphrasing makes you think carefully about the question
    • Paraphrasing helps you better understand the question

Arrange the Times

  • This means that you figure out how much time you can spend answering the question
  • Factors to consider:
    • Total test time
    • Number of test parts
    • Number of points/part
    • Number of essay questions

Example of Arranging the Times

  • Example Criteria:
  • Total test time: 45 min
  • Test parts: One (all essay)
  • Number of essay questions: One
    • 2 min. A & N Steps
    • 3 min. Outline (Frame)
    • 37 min. Writing
    • 3 min. Review

Name your goal

  • This means that you state a positive goal for the test.
    • “I am going to do well on this part of the test.”
    • “I am going to do a quality job.”
    • “I am going to earn all the points I can on this question.”

Lesson 2 Learning Sheet A

Lesson 2 Learning Sheet A

  • INSTRUCTIONS:
  • 1. Complete the ‘A’ and ‘N’ Steps for these questions.
  • 2. Underline key action words once.
  • 3. Underline the requirements twice.
  • 4. Based on the testing criteria below each question, figure out how many minutes to spend creating an outline, writing the answer, and checking it. Write these numbers on the lines in front of the question.

Lesson 2 Learning Sheet A, cont.

  • K = Key words underlined R= Requirements underlined N=correct numbers
  • 3 10 2

Lesson 2 Learning Sheet A, cont.

  • Mastery = 80%
  • Prewrite

Let’s Try a PreWrite

Consider these two contrasting statements: “Look before you leap” and “He who hesitates is lost.” Select the one you believe to generally be the best advice. Persuade the reader by using an example from your own life as well as an example from historical or current events.

  • Let’s do the A & N steps:

Work with a Partner

Consider these two contrasting statements: “Look before you leap” and “He who hesitates is lost.” Select the one you believe to generally be the best advice. Persuade the reader by using an example from your own life as well as an example from historical or current events.

  • Start to write your
  • Rough draft

Lesson 6: Learning Sheet A

  • INSTRUCTIONS:
  • 1. Choose ONE question on this learning sheet and read it carefully.
  • 2. Underline key action words once.
  • 3. Underline the requirements twice.
  • 4. Based on the testing criteria below each question, figure out how many minutes to spend creating an outline, writing the answer, and checking it. Write these numbers on the lines in front of the question.
  • 5. Create an outline for your answer on the back of this sheet. Be sure to put the number of the question next to your outline.
  • 6. Write your essay answer on separate sheets of paper. Attach your essay to this sheet when you are finished.

Lesson 6: Learning Sheet A, cont.

Example

  • Edwardo Gonsales
  • Lesson 6 Learning Sheet A
  • Outline for Question 1: Name the kind of car
  • you would like to own. Give three reasons why.
  • Porsche
  • 1. Classy
  • 2. Sporty
  • 3. Expensive

Example, cont.

  • Edwardo Gonsales
  • Lesson 6 Learning Sheet A
  • Essay for Question 1:
  • The kind of car I’d like to own is a Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet. My reasons include how it looks and the prestigue that goes with it.
  • First, it’s a classic car with classic lines.
  • Second, it’s a very sporty car. It’s low to the ground and it can really maneuver.
  • Third, it’s expensive. If I can afford to own a Porsche, that means that I will have done well in life. That would make me happy.

Writing your answer …

  • Introductory paragraph
  • Main Idea Paragraph #1
    • Topic Sentence
    • Detail Sentences
  • Main Idea Paragraph #2
    • Topic Sentence
    • Detail Sentences
  • Main Idea Paragraph #3
    • Topic Sentences
    • Detail Sentences
  • Conclusion (So What?)

Feedback is critical

  • Check out the score sheet.

The Essay Test-Taking Strategy …



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