What, Why, and How?



Download 55,41 Kb.
Date conversion04.06.2017
Size55,41 Kb.
  • What, Why, and How?
  • Plagiarism: * Definition and repercussions * Honesty Pledge Quoting and Paraphrasing Smoothly Integrating Quotations * Never drop quotes * Connect quotes to introductory phrases * Follow quotes with an explanation of their significance * Properly cite and punctuate quotes Researching: * Evaluating outside sources * Search strategies
  • INTEGRATING SOURCES
  • 10
  • WHAT IS PLAGIARISM?
  • While some cultures may not insist so heavily on documenting sources of words, ideas, images, sounds, etc., American culture does. To be fair and ethical, you must always acknowledge your debt to the writers of the sources you use. Uncredited use (both intentional and unintentional) of somebody else's words or ideas is plagiarism, which is a serious academic offense.
  • The following acts are considered plagiarism: (1) Copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit (2) Failing to enclose borrowed language in quotation marks (3) Changing words but using the sentence structure of a source (4) Mixing an author's phrases with your own without citation or quotes (5) Turning in someone else’s work as your own
  • WHY IS PLAGIARISM BAD?
  • * Plagiarism is stealing and stealing is illegal. We all know that stealing physical property is a criminal offense but you should also know that stealing intellectual property, which is protected under copyright law, is also a criminal offense.
  • * You can’t strengthen your own writing skills (skills necessary to be successful in college, the workplace, and life) if you are submitting the work of someone else and not doing the work yourself.
  • * You lose the trust and goodwill of your instructor.
  • * You lose your own satisfaction and self-pride that comes from earned accomplishments.
  • WHAT WILL HAPPEN IF I PLAGIARIZE?
  • * You will receive a failing grade of “F” on the plagiarized assignment.
  • * Your name can be submitted to the dean to be added to a list of students who have been guilty of plagiarizing, and this list can be shared with your current and future instructors.
  • * You may be referred to the College Disciplinarian for further sanctions which range from a warning to expulsion from Skyline College.
  • HOW DO I AVOID PLAGIARIZING?
  • Chapter 10: Integrating Sources ((253-273) shows you how to best select and properly integrate your sources and Chapter 5: MLA Conventions (170-182) shows you how to properly cite your sources within the paper and at the end on a Works Cited page. Another way to avoid plagiarizing is to begin the semester by making a good faith “honesty pledge.”
  • Honesty Pledge
  • The goal of taking a college English course is to strengthen your writing skills, so you can be a successful and confident writer and thinker. You can then apply your strong writing skills to thrive in your other courses, in your career, in personal communication, and in life. Plagiarizing the work of others undermines this goal. Also, an instructor is a student’s ally; an instructor’s only goal is to teach and guide the student to improve and feel successful. Plagiarizing destroys the trust and the relationship between the instructor and the student. Instructor promise: As the instructor, I promise to respect all students in the course and provide thoughtful and thorough comments on their writing with the goal of guiding each student with concrete and specific ways to strengthen his/her writing. Even though providing quality and detailed feedback on writing is very time-consuming, I commit to providing the best and most constructive feedback that I am able. Student promise: As the student, I promise to turn in writing that is entirely my own and is not plagiarized or copied from another source. When I do incorporate the ideas of other writers, I will properly cite all borrowed words and ideas. I also understand the repercussions if I do plagiarize: I will receive a failing grade of “F” on the assignment, and my name will be submitted to the dean to be added to a list of students who have been guilty of plagiarizing, and this list can be shared with my current and future instructors; additionally, I may be referred to the College Disciplinarian for further sanctions which range from a warning to expulsion from Skyline College.
  • WHAT IS QUOTING AND PARAPHRASING?
  • When you are asked to write about or analyze text(s), you will use quotes and paraphrases from them. What is the difference between quoting and paraphrasing?
  • Quoting: Is using the direct language from another person either in full sentences or groups of words and putting the borrowed language between quotation marks.
  • Paraphrasing: Is putting the ideas or arguments of another person entirely into your own words.
  • WHY QUOTE VERSUS PARAPHRASE?
  • Before you use a quotation, decide if you can use your own words (paraphrase) to express the author's ideas. If you include too many quotations, readers form the impression that you cannot think for yourself. However, in text-based writing, you will want to include some quotes so you keep your analysis of the text central to your discussion.
  • Use quotations when…
  • the original language is as important as the ideas it contains, that is, when the author’s words are so articulate or expressive that they deserve to be preserved.
  • the original language is concise and a paraphrase would be too wordy.
  • the original language is from an established authority who could lend extra credibility to your claims.
  • the original language itself is the object of analysis, a situation that happens most commonly when writing about literature.
  • HOW DO I PROPERLY QUOTE AND PARAPHRASE?
  • When you quote, you want to enclose all borrowed language between quotation marks and then provide an in-text citation that cites the source. In MLA formatting, the in-text citation generally includes the author’s last name and the page number in parenthesis after the quote (Garcia 21). See Chapter 5: MLA Conventions for more detail.
  • When you paraphrase, you are deciding that an author's ideas but not his/hers exact words are important to your point. A paraphrase should not change the ideas but it can eliminate or change words, often in order to condense a long sentence that contains details unnecessary to your point. Even though you are not quoting, you still need to credit the source you are paraphrasing by making it clear in the context of your discussion or by citing it as you would a quote.
  • EXAMPLE
  • Quoting and Paraphrasing
  • Original: The solidarity that characterizes communities does not mean, however, that all is unity and harmony within. Many commentators err, I think, by insisting that absence of conflict, like the family conflict we all know, is real, though it differs from, say, market competition, in being mediated by emotional bonds. (from "The Meanings of Community" by Thomas Bender, page 67.)
  • Quote: According to Bender, "The solidarity that characterizes communities does not mean, however, that all is unity and harmony within" (67).
  • Paraphrase: While some people believe a lack of conflict characterizes community, Bender asserts that some communities may have and need conflict.
  • Partial Paraphrase: Unlike other forms of conflict, though, Bender believes that family conflict is "mediated by emotional bonds” (67).
  • In writing you will use a mixture of direct quotations, paraphrases and partial paraphrases. Using the original quotations below, create one of each type:
  • Quote 1: "In my teaching I never concealed my political views: my detestation of war and militarism, my anger at racial inequality, my belief in a democratic socialism, in a rational and just distribution of the world's wealth. I made clear my abhorrence of any kind of bullying, whether by powerful nations over weaker ones, governments over their citizens, employers over employees, or by anyone on the Right or Left, who thinks they have a monopoly on the truth." (from Howard Zinn's book You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train, page 7).
  • Quote:
  •   Paraphrase:
  •   Partial Paraphrase:
  • Quote 2: "The eye-for-an-eye philosophy, the impulse to defend oneself when attacked, has always been held as the highest measure of American manhood. We are a nation that worships the frontier tradition, and our heroes are those who champion justice through violent retaliation against injustice. It is not simple to adopt the credo that moral force has as much strength and virtue as the capacity to return a physical blow; or that to refrain from hitting back requires more will and bravery than the automatic reflexes of defense." (from Martin Luther King's book Why We Can't Wait, page 24).
  • PRACTICE
  • Quote:
  •   Paraphrase:
  •   Partial Paraphrase:
  • (Pause)
  • Quote: Howard Zinn conveys to his students his strong convictions that no one has the right to oppress another under any circumstance, “I made clear my abhorrence of any kind of bullying, whether by powerful nations over weaker ones, governments over their citizens, employers over employees, or by anyone on the Right or Left, who thinks they have a monopoly on the truth” (7).  Paraphrase: Zinn shares his support of equality for all people and his anti-oppression viewpoints with his students.
  • Partial Paraphrase: Zinn fearlessly shares his controversial political views such as his “detestation of war and militarism” (7).
  • Quote: King looks to our historical background in the U.S. to understand why we are a people so driven by violence:We are a nation that worships the frontier tradition, and our heroes are those who champion justice through violent retaliation against injustice” (24).
  •   Paraphrase: King asserts it is harder to practice non-violence in the U.S. where we admire people who are willing to commit violence.
  •   Partial Paraphrase: King sadly observes that the “highest measure of American manhood” (24) is a person’s willingness to commit violent revenge.
  • ANSWERS
  • QUOTE 1: Howard Zinn
  • QUOTE 2: Martin Luther King Jr.
  • WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO SMOOTHLY INTEGRATE QUOTATIONS?
  • When you are incorporating the direct language of others into your own writing, you want that integration to be fluid and seamless. You don’t want your reader to get lost or confused as you transition from your voice and ideas to another person’s. You want to use quotations in a way that clarify, support, and strengthen your writing.
  • WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?
  • - Readers can better understand the relevance of smoothly integrated quotations.
  • - Readers can clearly see the connection between an integrated quotation and what it is trying to prove or illustrate.
  • - Readers can be better convinced by evidence presented in smoothly integrated quotations.
  • - Readers don’t experience being lost or frustrated by quotations that appear unrelated, inappropriate, or off topic.
  • HOW DO I SMOOTHLY INTEGRATE QUOTATIONS?
  • I. NEVER drop quotes. A dropped quote is a quote from someone else that is placed in your writing but it stands alone and is not introduced and not integrated into a sentence of your own. A dropped quote interrupts the flow of your writing, as the reader must jump abruptly from your words to someone else’s and back again. Also, if you’re not integrating direct quotations into your own writing, you’re probably not giving your reader the context they need to understand the quote.
  • II. Connect quotes to phrases that introduce them.
  • 1) Identify the speaker and context of the quote
  • Example: Dee protests to her mother that her sister does not know the true value of the quilts, “Maggie can’t appreciate these quilts! She’d probably be backward enough to put them to everyday use” (Walker 490).
  • 2) Lead in with your own idea
  • Example: Miss Emily Grierson’s house is a reflection of her being out of sync with the times: “But garages and cotton gins had encroached and obliterated even the august names of that neighborhood; only Miss Emily’s house was left, lifting its stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and gasoline pumps—an eyesore among eyesores” (Faulkner 459). Continued…
  • 3) Formulas • In (title of source), (author) writes/ argues/ explains/ describes, "quote" (#).
  • Example: In I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou writes, "In Stamps the segregation was so complete that most Black children didn't really absolutely know what whites looked like" (20).
  • • According to (author) in (title), "quote" (#). To avoid monotony, try to vary your formulas. The following models suggest a range of possibilities: In the words of researcher Herbert Terrace, “…” Jason Applegate, Smith’s trainer, points out, “…” “…,” claims linguist Noam Chomsky. Psychologist H.S. Terrace offers an odd argument for this view, “…”
  • II. Connect quotes to phrases that introduce them.
  • Integrating Quotes using introductory Phrases: For each quote below, create a sentence that smoothly integrates the quote. Try a few different methods:
  • Method #1: Identify the speaker and context of the quote:
  • Quote: "On this island, you walk too far and people speak a different language. Their own words reveal who belongs on what side" Background information: From The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat, the speaker is Senora Valencia, page 304. Senora Valencia is referring to the island of Hispanola, which the countries of Haiti and the Dominican Republic share. She is speaking during the times that the dictator Trujillo had many Haitians murdered in and exiled from the Dominican Republic.
  • Quote integrated into a sentence: Continued…
  • PRACTICE
  • Method #2: Lead in with your own idea:
  • Quote: "They did not have the tanates to go up north and break through the wall of electric fences and enter the land of plenty, the U.S. of A., a land so rich that what garbage they throw away in one day could feed entire pueblos." Background information: From Macho! By Victor Villasenor, page 31. The book tells the story of a young man named Roberto from Michoacán who risks himself to go north to California to work as an illegal alien picking fruit in California.
  • Quote integrated into a sentence: Continued…
  • PRACTICE
  • Integrating Quotes using introductory Phrases: For each quote below, create a sentence that smoothly integrates the quote. Try a few different methods:
  • Method #3: Formula (try using a good and dynamic verb):
  • Quote: "Racial targeting and abuse by police is costly. U.S. taxpayers have paid tens of millions of dollars in police brutality lawsuits. Between 1992 and 1993, Los Angeles county alone paid more than $30 million to citizens victimized by police brutality." Background information: From The Color of Crime by Katheryn K. Russell, page 45 who writes about the ways in which African-Americans are misrepresented by the media and mistreated within the criminal system. Quote integrated into a sentence: Continued…
  • Integrating Quotes using introductory Phrases: For each quote below, create a sentence that smoothly integrates the quote. Try a few different methods:
  • PRACTICE
  • Method #1: Identify the speaker and context of the quote:
  • Quote: "On this island, you walk too far and people speak a different language. Their own words reveal who belongs on what side" Background information: From The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat, the speaker is Senora Valencia, page 304. Senora Valencia is referring to the island of Hispanola, which the countries of Haiti and the Dominican Republic share. She is speaking during the times that the dictator Trujillo had many Haitians murdered in and exiled from the Dominican Republic.
  • Method #2: Lead in with your own idea:
  • Quote: "They did not have the tanates to go up north and break through the wall of electric fences and enter the land of plenty, the U.S. of A., a land so rich that what garbage they throw away in one day could feed entire pueblos." Background information: From Macho! By Victor Villasenor, page 31. The book tells the story of young man named Roberto from Michoacán who risks himself to go north to California to work as an illegal alien picking fruit in California.
  • Method #3: Formula (try using a good and dynamic verb):
  • Quote: "Racial targeting and abuse by police is costly. U.S. taxpayers have paid tens of millions of dollars in police brutality lawsuits. Between 1992 and 1993, Los Angeles county alone paid more than $30 million to citizens victimized by police brutality." Background information: From The Color of Crime by Katheryn K. Russell, page 45 who writes about the ways in which African-Americans are misrepresented by the media and mistreated within the criminal system.
  • (Pause)
  • PRACTICE
  • For each quote below, create a sentence that smoothly integrates the quote. Try a few different methods:
  • Method #1: Identify the speaker and context of the quote:
  • Senora Valencia describes the severe division that exists in her homeland of Hispanola due to Trujillo’s bloody dictatorship, "On this island, you walk too far and people speak a different language. Their own words reveal who belongs on what side” (Danticat 304).
  • Method #2: Lead in with your own idea:
  • Villasenor captures the decadence of the United States through the hungry eyes of Roberto, a young boy who risks going north to work illegally, "They did not have the tanates to go up north and break through the wall of electric fences and enter the land of plenty, the U.S. of A., a land so rich that what garbage they throw away in one day could feed entire pueblos” (31).
  • Method #3: Formula (try using a good and dynamic verb):
  • In The Color of Crime, Katheryn K. Russell exposes: "Racial targeting and abuse by police is costly. U.S. taxpayers have paid tens of millions of dollars in police brutality lawsuits. Between 1992 and 1993, Los Angeles county alone paid more than $30 million to citizens victimized by police brutality” (45).
  • Potential answers:
  • ANSWERS
  • After the quote, provide your own reasoning and analysis explaining the significance and relevance of the quote.
  • III. Follow quotes with an explanation of their significance.
  • APPROACH 1: SAY, MEAN, MATTER? “Say, Mean, Matter” is a 3-step approach to select good quotes, understand them, and then analyze them.
  • PRACTICE
  • (Pause)
  • III. Follow quotes with an explanation of their significance.
  • APPROACH 2: QUOTE SANDWICH Using the quote sandwich assures you properly introduce a quote and include the necessary analysis.
  • III. Follow quotes with an explanation of their significance.
  • Topic sentence: In the autobiographical work, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, the author’s experience with education sharpens his views on the depravity of slavery, both for the slave and his master. Top bread or Introduction: One of his masters begins to teach him how to read and at first, Douglass finds her to be a “kind and tender-hearted woman” (2). However, their slave-master relationship soon disintegrates. Meat or quote: He writes, “Slavery proved as injurious to her as it did to me…The first step in her downward course was in her ceasing to instruct me. She now commenced to practice her husband’s precepts. She finally became even more violent in her opposition [to my reading] than her husband himself” (2). Bottom bread or analysis: Not only does it become more difficult to find time and support for learning to read, but the very nature of slavery also demoralizes both Douglass and his slave-owner. The woman refuses to instruct him any longer, and opposes his education even more than her husband, for she fears that once Douglass learns how to read, the slave-master relationship will change; he will question his enslavement. Because she feels threatened, she becomes a cold-hearted and fierce woman. Fortunately, Douglass learns to read without continued instruction, and in spite of direct and deliberate attempts to keep him from learning.
  • EXAMPLE
  • QUOTE SANDWICH
  • IV. Properly cite and punctuate quotes.
  • You have two options when you cite your sources within the text of your paper:
  • Properly cite all quotes and put all borrowed words inside quotation marks. How to do in-text citations is covered more thoroughly in Chapter 5: MLA Conventions, but here is a quick reminder of the basic MLA in-text citation format:
  • FIRST: Provide the author's name and the page number on which you found the material you are citing: Example: Forecasters agree that El Niño has "made for an unusual year" (Sampson 91).
  • SECOND: Provide author's name in text of your sentence and include only page number after the sentence. Example: Forecasters from across the country agree with John Sampson's statement that El Niño has "made for an unusual year" (91).
  • Note: Do not use commas, p., pgs., or any other such notation in the citation.
  • IV. Properly cite and punctuate quotes.
  • (1) Use quotations marks at the beginning and end of any word, phrase, line, or passage you quote.A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds,” wrote Ralph Waldo Emerson.
  • Properly punctuate sentences that integrate quotes.
  • (2) Commas and periods go inside quotations marks. After the professor stood up quietly and said, "I do not expect to continue at this position any longer," the other professors at the meeting stared at her in amazement.
  • (3) Periods go outside of parenthetical citations.
  • Malcolm X asserted, “Most students are potential revolutionaries…when you have an illegal, immoral, and unjust situation, it should be changed" (54).
  • (4) Semi‑colons, colons, and dashes go outside quotation marks. Baker focuses on two choices that cause young women "to be unclear about their goals": their interest in family life and their desire for professional success.
  • (5) Question marks and exclamation points go inside quotation marks, if they are part of the original quotation, but outside, if they are part of the sentence.
  • It was not all clear however, after the president exclaimed, “That is not an acceptable alternative!” Did you ever hear of someone suggesting that we remove all windmills “super fast or immediately, whichever comes first”?
  • (6) Use square brackets whenever you need to substitute or add words to a quotation. You can change individual words and then put them in brackets [ ] so that the quote fits your sentence grammatically. Sonny would “as soon as he came in from school, or wherever he had been when he was suppose to be at school [go] straight to that piano and [stay] there until suppertime” (Baldwin 275).
  • IV. Properly cite and punctuate quotes.
  • (7) Single quotation marks are placed inside regular quotation marks when you have a quote within a quote: Professor Stevens claimed that he "always asks his students Professor Begley's question about 'the meaning of a college education’ in order to start off the discussion.”
  • Properly punctuate sentences that integrate quotes.
  • (8) Sometimes you will want to leave out material in the middle of a passage, quoting the most important words. When you do this, use an ellipsis … which are three dots. Use these three dots if the omitted passage does not contain a period and four dots if it does: Fadiman observes that the doctors at MCMC “could hardly be expected to ‘respect’ their patients’ system of health beliefssince the medical schools they attended never informed them that diseases are caused by fugitive souls and cured by jugulated chickens” (61).
  • (9) If you decide to use a quotation of more than four lines, set it off from the rest of your essay by indenting half an inch on each side of the entire quote and continue double-spacing throughout. You do not need to put quotation marks around this block quotation, unless it is actual dialogue. The period goes after the quote and before the parenthetical citation. Gatsby experiences a moment of clarity while standing with Daisy on his dock. Fitzgerald writes: Possibly it had occurred to him that the colossal significance of that light had now to him vanished forever. Compared to the great distance that had separated him from Daisy it had seemed very near to her, almost touching her. It had seemed as close as a star to the moon. Now it was again a green light on a dock. His count of enchanted objects had diminished by one. (98)
  • IV. Properly cite and punctuate quotes.
  • (10) In deciding whether to quote or underline text titles, use the following guidelines:
  •  
  • Use quotation marks (“ ”) around the titles of shorter works such as short stories, essays, articles, poems, chapter names, song names.
  •  
  • SHORT STORY: Richard Christian Matheson's "Red"
  • ESSAY: "A Tale of Two Sitcoms" by Steven D. Stark
  • ARTICLE: "Generation Next" by Chris Smith
  • POEM : Lois‑Ann Yamanaka's "Haupu Mountain"
  • CHAPTER NAME: "Let's Go Mexico!" from How to Be a Chicana Role Model
  • SONG: "Livin' La Vida Loca" by Ricky Martin
  •  
  • Underline or italicize the titles of longer works such as books, novels, periodicals, newspapers, plays, movies, TV series, and album names.
  •  
  • BOOK: Errors & Expectations by Mina Shaughnessy
  • NOVEL: Island of the Sequined Love Nun by Christopher Moore
  • PERIODICAL: Newsweek
  • NEWSPAPER: The San Francisco Bay Guardian
  • PLAY: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead by Tom Stoppard
  • MOVIE: Chicken Run
  • TV SERIES: Buffy the Vampire Slayer
  • ALBUM: Less Than Jake's Losing Streak
  • Properly punctuate sentences that integrate quotes.
  • LOCATING THE APPLIED QUOTING ADVICE In this paragraph from an essay on Malcolm X’s “Learning to Read” locate the following features from the quoting advice in this section:
  • PRACTICE
  • The diligence and persistent effort Malcolm X showed in learning to read has become disappointingly rare. Malcolm X in his autobiography tells us that when he went to prison, he could hardly read or write. He decided the way to improve would be to copy the entire dictionary word for word by hand. He said to copy just the first page alone took an entire day. The next day he reviewed all the words he did not remember, so he slowly built his vocabulary, and at the same time he started educating himself about the larger world as he describes the dictionary as a “miniature encyclopedia” (2). Malcolm X carried on until he copied the entire dictionary cover to cover. However, the time he dedicated to his writing was not confined to this amazing achievement alone: “Between what I wrote in my tablet, and writing letters, during the rest of my time in prison I would guess I wrote a million words” (2). The dedication to his own education and how he strengthened his own intelligence and abilities through sheer force of will is impressive but unfortunately is the exception rather than the norm. In Generation Me, the author Jean Twenge addresses the present generation of people who have been taught to put themselves first and expect instant results without working hard to achieve them. Twenge states: “They are less likely to work hard today to get a reward tomorrow—an especially important skill these days, when many good jobs require graduate degrees” (157). If people are less willing today to work hard, then we are going to have increasingly uneducated, lazy people who spend more time complaining than achieving. With a lack of education we won’t be strong critical thinkers so will be easily taken in by people who want to exploit us for profit like advertisers and corporate America. Instead of defining who we are, people who want to sell us things will continue to shape our wants, desires and perceptions of ourselves.
  • (Pause)
  • ANSWERS
  • APPLYING THE QUOTING ADVICE: Here’s how the quoting advice was applied in the essay on Malcolm X’s “Learning to Read”:
  • WHAT IS GOOD RESEARCH?
  • Selecting good research involves supporting your ideas with credible sources which means being able to evaluate the quality of outside sources. Doing good research also involves using smart search strategies.
  • WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
  • - You will lose credibility and not be convincing if your sources are questionable or not reputable.
  • - You could end up presenting false information which will mislead your argument, your reader and yourself.
  • - You will save yourself a lot of time if you learn how to search effectively using focused and systematic approaches.
  • - You will engage in a larger academic community that will broader your thinking, understanding of, and connection to the issues and topics you are investigating.
  • HOW DO I DO IT?
  • HOW DO I KNOW WHAT KIND OF SOURCE TO LOOK FOR? When you write a research paper, you need to support your thesis by using academic quality sources. Sources come in many shapes and formats but some of the most common include:
  • - articles from magazines, newspapers or journals,
  • - books (either print or e-books),
  • - web pages
  • - other media (e.g. video or audio sources)
  • - personal interviews
  • - non-published documents (e.g. letters, flyers, handouts, etc.)
  •  
  • Before you begin to search for sources to support your ideas, you need to learn how to decide what are credible, academic-quality sources. Often the easiest sources to dig up won’t pass muster as valid sources for a college research paper.
  • HOW DO I KNOW IF A SOURCE IS TRUE, ACCURATE AND OF REASONABLE QUALITY?
  • To evaluate any source you find, you first need to find out the identity of the author or group that wrote or created the source, as well as the names(s) of the organization that published or produced the source. If you cannot identify these, stop here! Only sources that can be identified can be determined to be credible, right? You should not use any source whose author/organization cannot be identified.
  • If you can identify both the author and the publisher of the source, you’ll want to find out something more about them to determine whether they have the expertise or qualifications to produce a credible source for a college research paper. Here is a good question to ask yourself: Is the author of my source an expert in his/her field?
  • HOW DO I EVALUATE A SOURCE ONCE I HAVE VERIFIED IT? Here are some important criteria to use in evaluating the quality of a source:
  • Criteria 1: Length and substance of the text: Does this source provide a substantive, in-depth discussion of the topic, or merely a cursory, superficial overview? Is this a brief “sound-bite,” or a longer, more in-depth analysis? (In general, for web pages with less than about 10 medium-length paragraphs of text would be considered brief.)
  • Criteria 2: Author’s purpose: Is this a straightforward summary or overview of the topic, such as you would find in an encyclopedia article? Or is the author presenting a new interpretation, view, or explanation of the topic?
  • Criteria 3: Academic quality and reading level of the text: Is this a serious, complex, detailed, academic treatment of the topic, or is it lighter “popular” discussion geared for the general public?
  • Criteria 4: Originality of the text: Is this original writing, or is it copied and compiled from other sources? For a web site, is this primarily a list of links?
  • Criteria 5: Objectivity: Is the text primarily personal opinion rather than an objective discussion? If the text is primarily opinion, is this clearly stated, i.e. is the author clear about the fact that he/she is presenting a subjective view of the topic? Does the author acknowledge that there might be other worthy points of view?
  • Criteria 6: Sources & Documentation: Where did the author gather the information presented? Was it from original research, experiments, observation, interviews, books and documents? If lots of factual information is given, does the author cite his/her sources? Verify that the author used authoritative sources to back up his/her arguments and conclusions.
  • HOW DO I EVALUATE MAGAZINE, NEWSPAPER OR JOURNAL ARTICLES?
  • Magazine, newspaper and journal articles are typically reviewed and edited by publishers, editorial boards and copy editors before they are published. However, it’s still important to evaluate articles on your own using the same criteria we’ve discussed. Remember to:
  • Check the article’s author(s) just as for other types of sources
  • Check the publication (magazine, newspaper or journal) in which the article is published. If you’re not certain if the publication is valid for research, check the publication’s website to find out more about it. See if the publication has a Wikipedia article that might give some background on the publication. Is the publication linked to an educational institution or professional organization?
  • Has the author cited his/her sources in footnotes or at the end of the article?
  • Additionally, check the date of the publication. Is the research presented recent enough to be useful to your topic?
  • HOW DO I EVALUATE A WEB PAGE?
  •  
  • Web pages can contain valuable information for your research. However, information that you find on the web must be evaluated even more carefully than information found in books or articles. Why? In contrast to books and articles (which are reviewed for accuracy and quality by publishers, editorial boards or reviewers before they can be published), anyone can create a web page with no screening at all. Therefore, it’s especially important that you carefully evaluate information from the Internet if you intend to use it for your research.
  • When you evaluate a web source, you’ll need to ask yourself a few essential questions:
  • 1. What do you know about the author of the site?
  • Is the author an expert in his/her field --or just someone with an opinion? Remember: If you can’t identify a reputable author and/or organization responsible for the page, you should not cite it for college research.
  • a) Web pages by/for individual authors
  • If an individual has written the page and/or site, determine the author’s qualifications by asking:
  • * Is biographical information about the author available?
  • * What is his/her background in terms of education, experience, occupation, position, affiliation, publications, etc.
  • * Why does or doesn't this make him/her an expert?
  • Tip: Do a Google search to see if the author's name comes up in other web pages. Can you find reliable information about the person and determine his/her credibility?
  • b) Web pages by organizations
  • If an organization has authored the page and/or site, is information available about that organization, including its purpose or history? Tips:
  • - Look for a link such as "Who we are", “About Us”, "Philosophy," "Background," etc. on the page or the site home page.
  • - Is it an impartial group (like a university) or a group established to promote an idea or point of view (like the National Rifle Association or a political party or a religious group)?
  • - Do a Google search to see if the institution's name comes up in other web pages. Can you find reliable information about the organization?
  • HOW DO I EVALUATE A WEB PAGE?
  • 2. What is the basic purpose of the site?
  • Knowing the author’s reason for providing the information is key to evaluating it. It’s the same kind of common sense you use to make decisions every day. Understanding the purpose of the site will help you judge its validity for your research. Which type of site would you think is most objective? Would you trust a commercial site to provide objective information when you know the organization’s goal is to make a profit? Is the site:
  • - Scholarly? It’s written by researchers or experts in the field See: popular magazines vs. academic journals.
  • - Professional? It’s written by and primarily for those in a specific profession.
  • - Popular? It’s written for the general public. See: popular magazines vs. academic journals.
  • - Advocating? It’s promoting particular opinions/causes, including blogs
  • - Commercial? It’s promoting/selling services or products, or including advertisements for products or services.
  • 3. What type of site is it?
  • Identifying the domain type within the URL will give you additional clues about the type of site you’ve found, and therefore about your source of information. Ask yourself: which type of site do you think is most likely to provide information that is objective? Of high academic quality?
  • Some of the most common domain types are:
  • .edu: an educational institution (often reliable, but can be anything from scholarly research to students’ personal pages)
  • .gov: a government body (usually dependable)
  • .org: a non-profit organization (may or may not be biased), may be relatively objective or may present any political point of view
  • .com: a commercial enterprise (may be trying to sell or promote a product or service)
  • .net: originally for networking organizations, such as internet service providers, but now often used as an alternative to .com
  • HOW DO I EVALUATE INFORMATION FROM BOOKS?
  • Not surprisingly, to evaluate information from books, you can reuse your six criteria. Most importantly:
  • * Check the book’s author(s) just as for other types of sources
  • * Check the publisher (the company or organization that edited, designed, printed and distributed the book) of the book. What to look for?
  •  
  • - Some publishers are known for publishing particular types of books and have reputations for producing a certain level of quality in content and academic level. For example, a university press is a publisher closely affiliated with a university. University press books are considered to be highly respectable and reputable. They are often identified by (you’ll never guess) the words "university" and "press" in their names. Example: University of California Press.
  • - Various academic and professional organizations also publish books which can be extremely valuable for researchers because the materials tend to be written by experts in a field.
  • - Be careful about using self-published books! These books are less likely to have been reviewed by professionals in the field for the accuracy of the information presented.
  • You’re ready to start searching. But hold on! Though it’s natural to want to dive right in, you’ll save a lot of time and effort by devising a strategy before you do.
  • WHAT’S THE BEST STRATEGY TO SEARCH FOR MY SOURCES?
  • Before you begin searching for the perfect information on your topic, you should prepare for your search.
  • 1. Divide the research topic into "concepts" (different subtopics or elements). Concepts should not include question words, e.g. "who", "what", "why", nor words describing the relationship of different concepts, e.g. "effect of", "impact on." For example, a specific research question might be: How did Frederick Douglass regard women’s rights with respect to the abolition movement ? Were his views on these topics contradictory?
  •  
  • Look at the words in your research topic and identify the main ideas or "concepts."
  • This research question can be divided into two or three "concepts":
  • 1. Frederick Douglass 2. women’s rights 3. abolition movement
  • 2. Next, for each of the three concepts, think of other search words or phrases that might be used for the same idea.
  • Place an “OR” between each search word for the same concept. (The "OR" tells the search engine to look for documents with at least one of the words in each concept). For example,
  • 1. Frederick Douglass 2. women’s rights OR women’s suffrage OR suffragist* 3. anti-slavery OR abolition* OR “abolition movement”
  • HOW DO I USE ARTICLE DATABASES?
  • The best way to find good quality sources for college research papers will almost always be to use an article database accessible through the college library website.
  • On the Skyline College Library homepage, the "Quick Article Search" box will allow you to search for articles in tens of thousands of magazines, journals and newspapers, as well as eBooks, in the EbscoHost premium databases. Searches from the Quick Article Search box do not provide the full searching capabilities of the EbscoHost databases. To do a more precise search, you should use the "Advanced Search" mode by clicking the "Advanced Search" link. You can email yourself the articles you find in your search.
  • To access this and other article databases from home or off-campus, you will need a PLS library card, which is available for free from Skyline College Library (or any public or community college library in San Mateo County. Remember to access the database links from the Skyline Library homepage).
  • You can see a list of all of the databases available by clicking on the "Select a Database by Subject/Title" pull-down menu. To select a database to search, click on any title from the menu and then click the "GO" button.
  • HOW CAN I USE GOOGLE TO FIND ACADEMIC SOURCES?
  • Let's strategize. How can we use Google to search for information on our topic?
  • How did Frederick Douglass regard women’s rights with respect to the abolition movement ?
  •  
  • When using Google, it is most effective to put quotation marks (" ") around any search phrases-- any group of more than one word that should be searched together in a specific order. For example, for our topic, "women’s rights" and "abolition movement" are search phrases.
  • Also place an OR between each search term or search phrase for the same concept (The OR tells Google to look for documents with at least one of the words in each concept). So a Google search for our topic would look like this: "Frederick Douglass" AND “women's rights" OR “women’s suffrage” AND "abolition movement"
  • HOW CAN I LIMIT MY GOOGLE SEARCH FOR BETTER RESULTS?
  • 1. Limit your Google search to a specific domain
  • When searching the Web, it can be very useful to limit your search to just websites with a particular domain type, such as .edu for college or university sites, .gov for government sites or .org for organization sites. These domains will commonly have better quality sites than .com sites.
  • In Google, you can use the powerful site: command to limit the search to a specific domain. To limit the search to just .edu sites, for example, you would add: site:.edu to your search. To limit the search to just .org sites, add: site:.org to your search, or to search for just .gov sites, add: site:.gov to your search.
  • Here is an example of how we limited our search to only .edu sites by adding: site:.edu to the search: "Frederick Douglass" AND “women's rights" OR suffrage AND "abolition movement" and site:edu
  • 2. Use Google’s Similar option Another useful Google feature is the “Similar” option. When you find one page in a Google results page that provides very good information on your topic, you can find other pages that have similar information by clicking on the pull-down symbol to the right of the web address for that page (just below the title of the page on the Google results list) and then click on the “Similar” link. Google will then display a list of similar web pages.
  • HOW CAN I LIMIT MY GOOGLE SEARCH FOR BETTER RESULTS?
  • 3. Limit Google to News Articles
  • A basic Google search will find all types of web pages, but you can limit Google searches in various ways to improve your search results. One easy way to limit on Google is Google News, which includes only newspaper articles. To limit to Google News after doing a general Google Web search, click on the News button on the Google task bar below the search box on the results page (or if the News button is not shown, click on the More pull-down menu bar below the search box on the results page and select News from the menu). After clicking the News button, the results change--from web pages to news articles.
  • 4. Using Google Scholar When you only want to find information written by academics, Google Scholar - Google’s academic search engine - is a good place to go. Instead of searching for websites, Google Scholar searches a wide range of academic articles and books from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, and universities. In many cases, the sources are only abstracts (summaries) of articles, which do not provide the full-text of the article (or a significant charge is required for the full article), however you may usually be able to retrieve the full-text of these articles by using the Skyline College Library Article Delivery Service (if you are a Skyline College student doing research for a class assignment.) Go to: scholar.google.com

that concludes

  • 10
  • INTEGRATING SOURCES


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page