What Is Intelligence Anyway?



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What Is Intelligence Anyway?

  • Unit 9
  • Intelligence: power of learning, understanding
  • and reasoning; mental ability
  • --Even students with average intelligence can
  • be top students if they study hard.

What words will occur to you when you want to describe this great scientist?

  • bright
  • sensible
  • talented
  • brilliant
  • wise
  • gifted
  • smart
  • clever

The Professor and the Yo-Yo

Before Reading_4.1

Unit 9

Before Reading_3.10.2

  • Directions: Listen to the following passage and fill in the blanks.
  • Isaac Asimov
  • Name: Isaac Asimov
  • Occupation
  • Date of Birth
  • Place of Birth former Soviet Union
  • Date of Death 1992
  • Cause of Death
  • Writer / Chemist
  • _____________
  • 2 January 1920
  • _____________
  • 6 April
  • ______
  • HIV infection /AIDS
  • ________________
  • popular science
  • _____________

Before Reading_3.10.2

  • Isaac Asimov was born on 2 January 1920 in the former Soviet Union, but grew up in Brooklyn, New York. He taught biochemistry at Boston University until he retired in 1958 to become a full-time writer. Asimov had been publishing short stories since the late 1930s, and in 1952 published his first novel. The author of the classic Ⅰ, Robot series and The Foundation Trilogy, Asimov wrote more than 400 books and won every major science fiction award. He also wrote popular books and essays on science and technology, earning him the nickname "The Great Explainer." Isaac Asimov died of “heart and kidney failure, which were complications of the HIV infection” on 6 April 1992. HIV was not revealed as the cause of his death until 2002, when his widow Janet published the memoirs It's Been a Good Life.
  • How does the author start his essay?
  • Question + Story his point of view
  • How does the author develop his essay?
  • Examples of his auto-repair man
  • How does the author end his essay?
  • one-sentence paragraph his conclusion
  • trap the author with his trick

Text analysis-----Text structure

  • Introduction
  • Para.1-2
  • Development
  • Para.3-6
  • Conclusion
  • para.7
  • I score high in aptitude tests but it only means I am good at answering academic questions
  • The examples of the auto repairman show that intelligence is decided by the society one lives in.
  • Intelligence is not absolute and it is only one aspect of a person’s total qualities

Globe Reading2

  • Questions and Answers
  • 1. What did the author think of the high score he had achieved in the aptitude test?
  • 2. Does the author believe that he is highly intelligent?
  • 3. According to the author, what do the high scores really mean?
  • For Paras 1-2

Globe Reading3

  • My auto repairman once got a score of less than 80 on an intelligence test.
  • I estimated that my auto repairman could not have a score of more than 80 if he took an intelligence test.
  • F
  • ( )
  • 1.
  • Although I considered myself far more intelligent than my auto repairman, I had to ask him to fix my car when anything went wrong with it.
  • 2.
  • I would not score high in an intelligent test designed by a worker.
  • 3.
  • T
  • ( )
  • T
  • ( )
  • For Paras. 3-7
  • I was good at both physical work and brainwork.
  • 4.
  • I would do poor when working with my hands.
  • ( )
  • The numerical evaluation of intelligence is determined by the talented people.
  • 5.
  • The numerical evaluation of intelligence is determined by a small subsection of that society as an arbiter of such matters.
  • ( )
  • F
  • F
  • For Paras. 3-7
  • The joke
  • The prelude (前奏) of the joke
  • The question asked
  • by the repairman
  • My answer
  • My feeling
  • How could a blind
  • man buy scissors?
  • A deaf-and-dumb guy
  • bought nails by making
  • motions successfully.
  • made scissoring motions
  • with his first two fingers
  • laughed and said that
  • I was a moron
  • Uneasy
  • He cannot repair his car
  • His high I.Q
  • What is intelligence, anyway?
  • Discussion
  • Do you agree that sometimes highly educated people are not so smart as those who receive less education? Why or why not?

After Reading_4

  • Talking About the Pictures and writing the summary of the text
  • Thank you

After Reading_1.1

  • 考试得高分
  • 参加测试
  • 大惊小怪
  • 学究式的问题
  • 值得回答
  • 出试题
  • 据我估计
  • 想当然
  • receive a test
  • make a fuss over / of
  • an academic question
  • be worthy of answers
  • make up a test
  • Assignments:
  • 检查主要部件
  • explore the vitals of sth.
  • 神谕
  • divine oracles
  • Useful Expressions
  • 1.
  • 2.
  • 3.
  • 4.
  • 5.
  • 6.
  • 7.
  • 8.
  • 9.
  • 10.

After Reading_1.2

  • 12. 强加于我们身上
  • 13. 高度赞扬
  • 14. 从车下面抬起头
  • 15. 做捶打动作
  • 16. 挑出
  • 17. 开怀大笑
  • 18. 在所有顾客身上试验
  • foist on us
  • praise highly
  • raise one’s head from under a car
  • make a hammering motion
  • pick out
  • laugh heartily
  • try on all customers
  • 19. 确定
  • 20. 有一定原因或道理
  • for sure
  • have something there
  • 11. 口语能力
  • verbal talents

Unit 9

  • What Is Intelligence, Anyway?
  • Isaac Asimov
  • He cannot repair his car
  • He was caught by a joke
  • His high I.Q
  • What is intelligence, anyway?

Part I Paras.1-2

  • I have been scoring high in intelligence
  • tests all my life but it only means that I
  • am good at answering certain types of
  • academic questions.
  • aptitude: natural ability or skill (L2)
  • Examples:
  • --She has an attitude for dealing with people.
  • --He showed an aptitude for music at an early age.

fuss

  • 1.unnecessary,useless,or unwelcome expression of excitement, impatience, etc.
  • Don't make (such) a fuss.!
  • 2.an anxious, nervous condition
  • 3.an expression of annoyance, esp. for a good reason
  • make a great fuss about nothing
  • 小题大做
  • make a great fuss about trifles
  • fuss and feathers
  • 大吹大擂; 夸耀, 不必要的忧虑和紧张
  • get into a fuss
  • 焦急; 忙乱
  • kick up a fuss
  • [美俚]起哄, 骚乱; 大吵大闹
  • make a fuss of sb.
  • 对某人过分关心, 大肆吹捧某人
  • make a fuss over sb.
  • 对某人过分关心, 大肆吹捧某人
  • make a fuss over (about/of): (L4)
  • show unnecessary nervous excitement (esp. about unimportant things)
  • Examples:
  • --This is only a small cut. Don’t make a fuss.
  • --He asked himself why he had made such a big fuss about so simple a matter.
  • . Register (L6)
  • (v.) write in a list or record
  • Examples:
  • --I have registered for four courses for next semester.
  • --学生们必须在四月底完成新课程的注册。
  • Students have to finish registering for the new course by the end of April.
  • (n.) record or list
  • Example:
  • --The old man finally found the register of births and deaths.
  • academic: (9)
  • (1) scholarly, theoretical, not practical
  • Examples:
  • --His theory received little attention because he was unknown in the academic world.
  • --This question is purely academic.
  • (2) of a college or university
  • Examples:
  • --这一学年,他没有得到任何奖励。
  • He didn’t receive any prize in this academic year.
  • academic: 2) of a college or university 学院的
  • We have made good preparations and welcome the assessment of our university in academic year 2007 – 2008

bent: n. special natural skill or interest (L11)

  • She has a scientific bent.
  • 他生性爱好音乐。
  • He has a natural bent for music.

Actually, though, don’t such scores simply mean [ that I am very good at answering the type of academic questions] ( that are considered worthy of answers by the people ( who make up the intelligence tests — people with intellectual bents similar to mine ) ) ?(L8)

  • 1. the subject : such scores
  • 2. the predicate : mean
  • 3.the object : the clause “that I am very good at answering the type of academic questions”.
  • 4.an attributive clause modifying “academic questions”
  • 5. another attributive clause modifying the word “people”.

Difficult Sentences

  • Actually, though, don’t such scores simply mean [ that I am very good at answering the type of academic questions] ( that are considered worthy of answers by the people ( who make up the intelligence tests — people with intellectual bents similar to mine ) ) ? (L8)
  • Translate this sentence:
  • 然而,实际上,难道这类分数不是仅仅意味着我很善于回答那些编制智力测验的人们 —— 智力爱好跟我类似的人们 —— 认为值得回答的那类学究式的问题吗?
  • What function does this sentence perform in organizing the essay?
  • Transitional sentence
  • What effect does it achieve?
  • Coherence

intelligent & intellectual

  • An intelligent person: someone who has the ability to think, understand, and learn things quickly and well.
  • An intellectual person: someone who is interested in ideas or theories, rather than in practical matters.
  • For example:

Some scientists claim that dolphins are more intelligent than humans.

  • Some scientists claim that dolphins are more intelligent than humans.
  • Einstein knew there were answers beyond his intellectual reach.
  • See page 225 about intelligent and intellectual

Part II Paras. 3-6

  • The examples of the auto repairman show that intelligence is decided by the society one lives in.
  • What does the writer think of the intelligence test?
  • It can only show one aspect of a person's intelligence.
  • hasten: move or act with speed (15)
  • Examples:
  • --Upon learning the news of her son’s injury, she hastened to the hospital.
  • --毫无疑问,落后的医疗加速了他的死亡。
  • There is no doubt that poor medical treatment has hastened his death.
  • foist on: impose (someone or something unwanted) upon by coercion or trickery (L26)
  • Examples:
  • --Stores should not foist defective goods on customers.
  • --他是教徒, 但他不想把自己的信仰强加人。
  • --He's religious but he doesn't try to foist his beliefs on everyone.
  • --I’m sorry all this has been foisted on you.
  • whereupon: upon that; immediately
  • following that (L37)
  • Examples:
  • --I described my disastrous morning, whereupon, he laughed and laughed.
  • --The unsuspecting teacher pulled out the drawer; whereupon, a dozen frogs leaped out.
  • Note: The word “whereupon” is used in our text as an adverb, not as a conjunction.
  • goddamned: strongly cursed or damned(L45)
  • This expression is used as a strong expletive (咒骂语), often shortened to “goddamn”, considered inappropriate in polite society or on formal occasions. And students of English are not advised to use it.
  • --The professor is so goddamned educated that he is not very smart.

Difficult Sentences

  • Its numerical evaluation is determined by a small subsection of that society which has managed to foist itself on the rest of us as an arbiter of such matters. (L24)
  • What can we infer from the sentence?
  • The author believed that only a small group of people in society determined what intelligence was and forced all the others to accept their ideas.
  • Translate the sentence:
  • 它的数值是由那个社会中的一小部分人决定的,他们作为这类事情的仲裁人已设法把他们的意志强加在我们身上。

Part III Para 7

  • Intelligence is not absolute and it is only one aspect of a person’s total qualities
  • uneasy: awkward; not easy in mind or body (L46)
  • Examples:
  • --He gave an uneasy smile when he met his mother-in-law for the first time.
  • --The professor was so uneasy in suit and tie that he found an excuse to leave the dinner party early.

Difficult Sentences

  • And I have an uneasy feeling he had something there (L46)
  • Translate this sentence into Chinese:
  • 我有一种不安的感觉:他的话不无道理。
  • What can we infer from the sentence?
  • To some extent, the author agrees with the auto repairman that too much education made him not very smart.
  • What is your understanding of intelligence?

After Reading_1.1

  • 考试得高分
  • 参加测试
  • 大惊小怪
  • 学究式的问题
  • 值得回答
  • 出试题
  • 据我估计
  • 想当然
  • score high on a test
  • receive a test
  • make a fuss over / of
  • an academic question
  • be worthy of answers
  • make up a test
  • by my estimate
  • take sth. for granted
  • Useful Expressions
  • 检查主要部件
  • explore the vitals of sth.
  • 神谕
  • divine oracles
  • 1.
  • 2.
  • 3.
  • 4.
  • 5.
  • 6.
  • 7.
  • 8.
  • 9.
  • 10.

After Reading_1.2

  • 12. 强加于我们身上
  • 13. 高度赞扬
  • 14. 从车下面抬起头
  • 15. 做捶打动作
  • 16. 挑出
  • 17. 开怀大笑
  • 18. 在所有顾客身上试验
  • foist on us
  • praise highly
  • raise one’s head from under a car
  • make a hammering motion
  • pick out
  • laugh heartily
  • try on all customers
  • 19. 确定
  • 20. 有一定原因或道理
  • for sure
  • have something there
  • 11. 口语能力
  • verbal talents

Make a role play to perform the joke.

  • Activity:

Article1_S

  • What is intelligence, anyway? When I was in the army I received a kind of aptitude test that all soldiers took and, against a normal of 100, scored 160. No one at the base had ever seen a figure like that and for two hours they made a big fuss over me. (It didn’t mean anything. The next day I was still a buck private with KP as my highest duty.)
  • What Is Intelligence, Anyway?
  • Isaac Asimov
  • All my life I’ve been registering scores like that, so that I have the complacent feeling that I’m highly intelligent, and I expect other people to think so, too. Actually, though, don’t such scores simply mean that I am very good at answering the type of academic questions that are considered worthy of answers by the people who make up the intelligence tests — people with intellectual bents similar to mine?

Article2_S

  • For instance, I had an auto repairman once, who, on these intelligence tests, could not possibly have scored more than 80, by my estimate. I always took it for granted that I was far more intelligent than he was. Yet, when anything went wrong with my car I hastened to him with it, watched him anxiously as he explored its vitals, and listened to his pronouncements as though they were divine oracles — and he always fixed my car.
  • Before Reading
  • Global Reading
  • After Reading
  • Detailed Reading
  • Well, then, suppose my auto repairman devised questions for an intelligence test. Or suppose a carpenter did, or a farmer, or, indeed, almost anyone but an academician. By every one of those tests, I’d prove myself a moron. And I’d be a moron, too. In a world where I could not use my academic training and my verbal talents but had to do something intricate or hard, working with my hands, I would do poorly. My intelligence, then, is not absolute. Its worth is determined by the society I live in. Its numerical evaluation is determined by a small subsection of that society which has managed to foist itself on the rest of us as an arbiter of such matters.

Article3_S

  • Before Reading
  • Global Reading
  • After Reading
  • Consider my auto repairman, again. He had a habit of telling me jokes whenever he saw me. One time he raised his head from under the automobile hood to say: “Doc, a deaf-and-dumb guy went into a hardware store to ask for some nails. He put two fingers together on the counter and made hammering motions
  • Detailed Reading
  • with the other hand. The clerk brought him a hammer. He shook his head and pointed to the two fingers he was hammering. The clerk brought him nails. He picked out the sizes he wanted, and left. Well, doc, the next guy who came in was a blind man. He wanted scissors. How do you suppose he asked for them?”

Article4_S

  • Before Reading
  • Global Reading
  • After Reading
  • Detailed Reading
  • I lifted my right hand and made scissoring motions with my first two fingers. Whereupon my auto repairman laughed heartily and said, “Why, you dumb fool, he used his voice and asked for them.” Then he said, smugly, “I’ve been trying that on all my customers today.” “Did you catch many?” I asked. “Quite a few,” he said, “but I knew for sure I’d catch you.” “Why is that?” I asked. “Because you’re so goddamned educated, doc, I knew you couldn’t be very smart.”
  • And I have an uneasy feeling he had something there.

Assignment

  • Try to master the language points we have learned.
  • Read the text again and try to recite paragraph 7.
  • Do exercises III and IV on page221-223.

Unit 9

  • What Is Intelligence, Anyway?
  • Isaac Asimov

After Reading_4

  • Talking About the Pictures

After Reading_4.1

  • score high on a test
  • receive a test
  • make a fuss over / of
  • an academic question
  • be worthy of answers
  • make up a test

After Reading_4.2

  • by my estimate
  • take sth. for granted
  • explore the vitals of sth.
  • divine oracles

After Reading_4.3

  • make a hammering motion
  • pick out
  • a deaf –and- dumb guy

After Reading_4.4

  • laugh heartily
  • try on all customers
  • for sure
  • have something there

Before Reading_1.1

  • Definition of Intelligence
  • Intelligence is a term usually referring to a general mental
  • to reason, solve problems, think abstractly, learn new material, and from past experience. Intelligence can be by many different kinds of tasks. , this ability is expressed in many aspects of a person’s life. Intelligence a variety of mental processes, including memory, learning, , decision-making and reasoning. Yet no accepted definition of intelligence exists, and people continue to what, exactly, it is. questions remain: Is intelligence one general ability or several independent systems of abilities? Is intelligence a
  • of the brain, a characteristic of behavior, or a set of knowledge and skills?
  • capacity
  • ________
  • profit
  • _____
  • Likewise
  • _______
  • measured
  • _________
  • draws on
  • ________
  • perception
  • _________
  • universally
  • _________
  • debate
  • ______
  • Fundamental
  • ___________
  • property
  • ________
  • How does the author start his essay?
  • Question + Story his point of view
  • How does the author develop his essay?
  • Examples of his auto-repair man
  • How does the author end his essay?
  • one-sentence paragraph his conclusion
  • text structure and analysis
  • Good at Solving
  • mechanical problems
  • trap the author with his trick
  • his high I,Q ( score 160)
  • mean nothing, still a buck private
  • What is intelligence, anyway?
  • Less intelligent auto repairman
  • fix the car well each time
  • What is intelligence, anyway?
  • Less intelligent auto repairman
  • He was sure to catch me by a joke
  • What is intelligence, anyway?
  • introduction
  • development
  • development
  • I have an uneasy feeling he had something there
  • conclusion
  • He cannot repair his car
  • He was caught by a joke
  • His high I.Q
  • What is intelligence, anyway?
  • 1. What kind of person is an intelligent person?
  • 3. If one person excels in mathematics , another excels in English , who is more intelligent?
  • 2. If a person is good at sports or music, can we say he is an intelligent person?

After Reading_2

  • Today, many believe that there is more than one type of intelligence. American psychologist Howard Gardner the existence of intelligences, each linked to a separate system within the brain. He that there are seven types of intelligence: linguistic, logical-mathematical, , musical, bodily-kinesthetic, interpersonal, an . American psychologist Robert Sternberg suggested a different of intelligence, consisting of three : analytic (“school smarts,” as measured in academic tests), creative (a capacity for ), and practical (“street smarts,” or the ability to adapt to, select, and shape their environment).
  • Spot Dictation
  • psychologists
  • _________
  • proposed
  • ________
  • multiple
  • _______
  • theorized
  • ________
  • spatial
  • _______
  • intrapersonal
  • ___________
  • model
  • ______
  • components
  • ____________
  • insight
  • ______
  • real-world
  • _________
  • linguist
  • poet
  • 1.linguistic
  • scientist
  • mathematician
  • 华罗庚
  • 2.logical-mathematical
  • 胡壮麟
  • 李白
  • 郑成功
  • navigator
  • chess expert
  • 3. spatial
  • 贝多芬
  • musician/composer
  • 4.musical
  • 5. bodily-kinesthetic
  • athlete/ actor
  • religious persons
  • 7.intrapersonal
  • statesman/leader/ consultant
  • 6.interpersonal
  • seven types of intelligence
  • 1.linguistic
  • 2.logical-mathematical
  • 3. spatial
  • 4.musical
  • 5. bodily-kinesthetic
  • 6.interpersonal
  • 7. intrapersonal
  • linguists / poets
  • navigator/ chess expert
  • musician/ composer
  • athlete / actor/actress/dancer
  • statesman/leader/ consultant
  • religious persons

Before Reading_5

  • Take the IQ test below to see how intelligent you are.
  • A sample IQ test
  • Some people maintain that IQ tests are just for fun. Others argue that they are indeed testing man’s intelligence. What’s your opinion?
  • Intelligence Quotient (I.Q.)
  • The result of an intelligence test is called an IQ. Generally a person’s IQ is to be obtained by divided by his or her mental age (determined by a test) by his or her real age and multiplying the result by 100
  • (IQ=mental age ÷real age×100).
  • below 85 retardation(迟钝)
  • 85-100 average intelligence
  • 110-120 bright-average intelligence
  • 120-130 intellectually superior
  • above 130 intellectually very superior
  • gifted or genius

Writing Practice — Transition

  • A brief introduction
  • 1.Transition is frequently used to indicate the logical relationship within or between sentences. Different transitional words and phrases facilitate the conveyance of ideas in various ways. Therefore, it is easier for readers to follow the author’s line of thought.
  • WAY
  • Adding ideas
  • Jerry prefers coffee to milk. Furthermore, he prefers black coffee.
  • Emphasizing ideas
  • Max is hardworking, cheerful, and above all honest.
  • Illustrating ideas
  • We need to take everything into account. We have to consider, for instance, the cost of each item.
  • Comparing ideas
  • The first letter she wrote me was less than a page long, and her second letter was similarly brief.
  • Contrasting ideas
  • This is a cheap and simple process. However there are dangers.
  • Showing cause and effect
  • Since the prices of the raw materials have been raised, I'm afraid that we have to adjust the prices of our products accordingly.
  • Summarizing ideas
  • In conclusion, all the three factors contribute to the final success of the project.

Transitional words & phrases in the text

  • Transitional words & phrases in the text
  • actually, though (para. 2)
  • for instance; yet (para. 3)
  • then; then (para. 4)
  • again (para. 4)

Assignment

  • Write a paragraph of 120-150 words explaining your view of intelligence. You are required to cite examples to support your argument.

Writing skills

  • How does the author put his ideas together?
  • What is intelligence, anyway + Story
  • his point of view
  • For instance + example 1
  • Consider my auto-repair man again+ example 2
  • One-sentence paragraph
  • Thank you

After Reading_6.1

  • Proverbs and Quotations
  • 1.A wise man hears one word and understands two.
  • 智者听一知二。
  • 2.To much cleverness is folly.
  • 过分聪明反而愚蠢。
  • 3.Wisdom in the mind is better than money in the hand.
  • 脑中智慧胜过手中金钱。

After Reading_6.2

  • 5.You can tell whether a man is clever by his answers. You
  • can tell whether a man is wise by his questions.
  • — Naguib Mahfouz, Egyptian writer
  • 6.
  • Every man is a fool sometimes, and none at all times.
  • — George Kelly, American playwright and actor
  • 看一个人是否聪明看他的答案;看一个人是否有智慧看他提的题。
  • —— 埃及作家 纳吉布·马福兹
  • 任何人都会做蠢事,但没有人永远愚蠢。
  • —— 美国剧作家、演员 G · 凯利
  • Before Reading
  • Global Reading
  • After Reading
  • Detailed Reading


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