What are you reading? Recognition, Happy Birthdays and Congratulations!



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What are you reading?

Recognition, Happy Birthdays and Congratulations!

Addiction Issues? Is your cell phone in your backpack?

Tuesday puns

  • A grenade thrown into a kitchen in France would result in Linoleum Blownapart.
  •  
  • Two silk worms had a race. They ended up in a tie.
  •  
  • A hole has been found in the nudist camp wall. The police are looking into it.
  •  
  • Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.
  •  
  • Atheism is a non-prophet organization.
  •  
  • Two hats were hanging on a hat rack in the hallway. One hat said to the other, ‘You stay here; I’ll go on a head.’

AP Language and Composition It’s Tuesday, 24 October 2017

  • Time will pass; will you? 39 school days remain in the fall semester.
  • Today’s Objectives:
    • Students will:
      • Understand the tenets, techniques and purpose of a juvenilian satire.

Housekeeping

  • Ms. Trent is asking if the English department can help the band as they seek volunteers for a huge event on campus November 4. HHS is hosting the state marching festival, and 40 bands will be visiting HHS from 7:00 AM – 10:00 PM. Band members, parents, and friends are volunteering with different tasks throughout the day. If you need volunteer hours and want to support the Hamilton Band at the State Marching Festival on November 4th, you can pick the hours that work for you. Contact HamiltonBandFestivalVolunteers@gmail.com for a link to sign up.
  • Competitive Submissions/Active Writing contests (posted on the class website): 4
  • Keep abreast of the Daily Course Calendar. This is a fluid document…
    • Last updated October 20

Housekeeping

  • How we’ll handle Huck Finn
    • Research the controversy, and be prepared for a discussion on Monday, 11/20
    • Permission slips are due Monday
  • Satire your way
  • About those annotated bibliographies
    • Where has all the credibility gone?

Coming Due—do not squander time—that’s the stuff life’s made of!

    • Tomorrow:
      • Mitford’s “Behind the Formaldehyde Curtain”
    • Monday:
      • Huck Finn permission slips
      • Vocab Log #4
      • Annotated Bibs # 5-7
        • —tii upload is required —please upload these as three separate documents: #5, #6 and #7
  • Note on time management:
    • You should be spending 3-5 hours a week on research.
    • You should be completing the vocab/grammar assessment as the lessons and logs are completed.

Today’s Class: Understanding the tenets, techniques and purpose of a juvenilian satire.

  • Jessica Mitford’s “Behind the Formaldehyde Curtain”
    • Reading and analysis: “Behind the Formaldehyde Curtain”
      • Read and annotate the text closely—pay particular attention to Mitford’s word choices and use of the industry’s own words.
      • Work with your group to take notes on your questions (even or odd). Bring your fully developed, word-processed, answers in tomorrow, and be prepared to discuss the text.

Today’s Class Objective: Students will review the standards for credible research.

  • Class Website
    • Reviewing CARS—your “bible” for research
      • The CARS Checklist for Research (Credibility, Accuracy, Reasonableness, Support)
  • Be SAFE when you research—look for Statistics, Anecdotes, Facts and Expert Opinions
  • Check your Works Cited entries at OWL—the On-line Writing Lab at Purdue

Whose idea was this rhetoric thing?

  • Socrates: 469-399 B.C.E.
    • Father of Western philosophy and Mentor to Plato. Epistemology and logic.
  • Plato: 424-348 B.C.E.
    • Student of Socrates and founder of “The Academy” Philosophy, logic, ethics, rhetoric and mathematics.
  • Aristotle: 384-322 B.C.E.
    • Student of Plato, and teacher to Alexander the Great.

AP one-word scoring descriptors for timed writing essays:

  • Effective and Adequate Essays
  • A 9 is “unique”
  • An 8 is “sophisticated”
  • A 7 is “effective”
  • A 6 is “adequate”
  • A 5 is “uneven”
  • Ineffective Essays
  • A 4 is “inadequate”
  • A 3 is “unsuccessful”
  • A 2 is “confusing”
  • A 1 is “ugh?”

The “checked practice” assignments

  • I would rather reward you for effort than punish you with a grade for some assignments. We will do a number of “practice” assignments of varying levels of difficulty. I don’t always expect you to have the “right” answers; indeed, there may be many “right” answers as a matter of opinion. What I look for is thought and effort. I can tell by looking at your work approximately how much thought and time was put into the assignment.  Did you attempt to complete the assignment when you got to class, for example? This would definitely not demonstrate effort.
  •  If you would like to contest a grade, simply bring the assignment in to me, with proper reasons, and we’ll discuss it.
  •  
  • +: A range (90-100%): Excellence and Effort. Time, effort, and diligence are apparent. All the work is completed; full support is offered for all answers; examples are given when needed. (25 = 22.5-25)
  •  : B range (80-89%): Adequate work and effort. The work was completed, but more support and effort and development should be apparent. You understood the assignment, but might have done better. (25 = 20-22.5)
  • -: C range (70-79%): Average work and effort. An attempt was made to complete the assignment, but your understanding of it is not clear, effort may not be apparent and the work may be sloppy. (25 = 17.5-20)
  • U: D range (50-69%): unacceptable work. Your work is incomplete, rushed, or simply incorrect. This level or work in unacceptable for an AP-level class. (15)

Facts do matter—understand the point of credibility

Rhetoric

  • Rhetoric:
    • The traditional definition of rhetoric, first proposed by Aristotle, and embellished over the centuries by scholars and teachers, is that rhetoric is the art of observing in any given case the “available means of persuasion.”
  • Close Reading:
  • Rhetorical Analysis:
    • Defining an author’s purpose, then identifying and analyzing the techniques and strategies employed to achieve that purpose.

Today’s Class Vocabulary log out? Objective: To review and begin to learn the basics of synthesis writing.

  • What is synthesis writing?
    • From a Greek root which means “to put together,” synthesis is the process of bringing together information from various sources, written or visual, to develop a position on a particular topic and form a new whole.
      • Explanatory Synthesis: brings together sources to illustrate a subject (encyclopedias, textbooks, brochures, museum guides, music performance notes, etc.)
      • Argumentative Synthesis aims to persuade, to convince readers of a claim. Some evidence (sources) is provided to support the claim, while other evidence (sources) may be used to represent views the writer rejects (commonly known as refutation).

Evaluation

  • The 9-point rubric
  • The Anchor Papers—these are “samples”—responses vary
  • Camera Shots (these are worth 50 points)
  • Scoring…

Why Goals and Objectives?

  • Course Goal—broad, long-term
    • To understand the elements of argument and other genres or writing, and apply them in both writing, and analysis.
  • Daily Objective—accomplishing “pieces” of the “goal,” one step at a time
    • To understand and evaluate the finer elements argument


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