Welcome Message – Dr. Harter



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Glossary


Term

Definition

Common Rubrics




Backwards Planning

The teacher starts with outcomes for the students and then plans the curriculum to lead toward those outcomes.

Formative Assessment

Assessment that provides feedback to the teacher and to students for the purpose of improving instruction and learning. Frequently referred to as “assessment FOR learning”. Formative assessment includes minute-by-minute monitoring of student learning, checking for understanding, diagnostic and progress monitoring assessments, and pre-assessments, and student self-assessments.

Learning Outcome (or Learning Target)

The academic knowledge, behaviors, and skills that students (or others) are expected to learn and demonstrate. Learning outcomes can be created for a specific lesson, task or project, for a course, or for a student’s career in a pathway or school.

Multidisciplinary Project

When working on multi-disciplinary projects, students are charged with finding viable solutions to real problems, or with achieving specific individual or group outcomes, through units of instruction that are horizontally aligned in several disciplines.

Performance-Based Assessment (ConnectEd’s definition)

A form of testing that requires students to perform a task rather than select an answer from a ready-made list. It is an activity that requires to construct a response, create a product, or to perform a demonstration. The more it reflects a “real world” situation, the more authentic it is.

Performance Assessment (Envision’s definition)

A multi-step assignment that asks students to create a response or product in order to demonstrate and measure complex skills.

Performance Mapping

The process of determining and representing performance criteria within a purposely designed course and pathway scope and sequence.

Portfolio

A systematic and organized collection of a student’s work that exhibits to others the direct evidence of a student’s efforts, achievements, and progress toward learning outcomes over a period of time.  The collection should involve the student in selection of its contents, and should include information about the performance criteria, the rubric of criteria for judging merit, and evidence of student self-reflection or evaluation.

Portfolio Assessment

A portfolio becomes a portfolio assessment when (1) the assessment purpose is defined; (2) criteria or methods are made clear for determining what is put into the portfolio, by whom, and when; and (3) criteria for assessing either the collection or individual pieces of work are identified and used to make judgments about performance. Portfolios can be designed to assess student progress, effort, and/or achievement, and encourage students to reflect on their learning.

Rubric

A rubric is an important teaching and assessment tool that clearly defines for the student, teacher, and others a range of performance and/or product quality for specific criteria linked to student learning outcomes. Rubrics have performance criteria, levels and descriptors.

Performance Criteria: Criteria define the attributes of the performance and/or product being assessed on the rubric.

Performance Levels: Levels define the scale for scoring performance and/or product quality.

Performance Descriptors: Descriptors specifically define the attributes of the performance or product for each criterion, at each level of quality.



Summative Assessment

A culminating assessment, which gives information on students' mastery of content, knowledge, or skills. Frequently referred to as “assessment OF learning”.

Program of Study Worksheet






9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

ACADEMIC CORE

English













Mathematics













Science













History/Social Science













Language Other
Than English













Visual and
Performing Arts













TECHNICAL CORE

Technical Courses















WORK-BASED

Work-based Learning Opportunities













SUPPORT SERVICES

Support Services and Personal-ization













INTEGRATED CURRICULUM

Integrated Curriculum













Gap Analysis Worksheet

Gap Analysis Worksheet: To be used in conjunction with the Rubric for Linked Learning Pathway Certification

To facilitate team collaboration and shared leadership, each certification criteria section is color coded with a page break between each section.




Pathway: Lead: School: District:

1. PATHWAY DESIGN

The pathway is designed with a structure, governance, and program of study that provide all students with opportunities for both postsecondary and career success.



Criteria #

Criteria Not Met

Criteria Met

Criteria Exceeded

Existing Evidence for Student Outcomes/ Certification Criteria

Self Assessment*


Priority**


1.1

Design Structure

1.1.1. Pathway theme


Pathway theme is either (1) defined narrowly and, as such, limits postsecondary and/or career options for participants, or (2) is not designed to accommodate a full range of students regardless of their prior academic achievement and/or postsecondary aspirations.

Pathway represents a theme that is broad enough to appeal to and engage any student, regardless of his or her prior academic achievement and postsecondary aspirations. The theme has been selected based on at least student interest and one other criterion.

Pathway represents a theme that is broad enough to appeal to and engage any student, regardless of his or her prior academic achievement and postsecondary aspirations. The theme has been thoughtfully selected based on student interest and several other criteria, which may include teacher expertise, regional workforce needs, existence of related career and technical education (CTE) course sequences, articulation opportunities with nearby postsecondary institutions, and the interest of industry partners.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.2. Program of study


Pathway consists of a program of study that either (1) is not coherent, (2) spans less than 3 years, (3) includes fewer than three academic courses and one technical course per grade level, or (4) is not sequenced and coordinated.

Pathway consists of a coherent program of study that spans at least grades 10–12 and includes at least three core academic courses and one technical course (or equivalent) in each grade level. By design, the curriculum is sequenced and coordinated.

Pathway consists of a coherent 4-year program of study that includes core academic courses and at least one technical course at each grade level. By design, the curriculum is sequenced and coordinated.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.3. Student recruitment and selection


Pathway’s student recruitment and selection process either (1) is not formalized, (2) does not provide open access, (3) assigns students, or (4) yields a demographic distribution that is substantially different than that of the school and district.

Pathway’s student recruitment and selection process is formalized and ensures open access to students who volunteer for the pathway based on their interests. Pathway demographics reflect relatively well (within 20 percent of racial/ethnic, gender, and achievement groups) those of the school and district.

Pathway’s student recruitment and selection process is formalized and ensures open access to students who volunteer for the pathway based on their interests. Pathway demographics reflect almost exactly those of the school and district.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.4. Cohort scheduling


Cohort scheduling is not implemented at a level that allows the vast majority of pathway students to participate in multidisciplinary projects.

Pathway students participate as a cohort in the academic and technical courses that are part of the Program of Study to enable flexible use of class time and instructional methodologies that promote multidisciplinary projects and work-based learning experiences.

School and pathway leadership nurtures a professional learning community among staff, and the schedule provides daily collaboration time for program coordination, the analysis of student work and data, curricular integration, and resolution of student problems.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.5. Staff collaboration


Pathway staff either (1) do not operate as a professional learning community, (2) do not meet regularly, or (3) do not make effective use of collaboration time.

School and pathway leadership nurtures a professional learning community among staff, and the schedule provides weekly collaboration time for program coordination, the analysis of student work and data, curricular integration, and resolution of student problems.

School and pathway leadership nurtures a professional learning community among staff, and the schedule provides daily collaboration time for program coordination, the analysis of student work and data, curricular integration, and resolution of student problems.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.6. Pathway preparation and orientation


Students enter into a pathway with little or no orientation or transition services.

The pathway provides an orientation and other transition services for incoming students preferably beginning in middle school and involving parents.

For two or more years prior to pathway entry, parents and students are informed of pathway options and are exposed to a sequence of activities to ensure appropriate pathway selection, preparation, and smooth transition.










1.1

Design Structure

1.1.7. Postsecondary articulation


Pathway may have connections with local postsecondary institutions, but formal agreements are either lacking or limited.

Pathway promotes a seamless transition at least to local community college(s) by putting in place articulation agreements, dual- enrollment, and/or other formal and informal activities. Articulation with other institutions is planned or in progress.

Pathway assures a seamless transition to multiple postsecondary education and training options through articulation agreements, dual- enrollment, and other formal and informal activities.










1.2

Governance

1.2.1. Advisory board with broad representation


An advisory board may exist, but either (1) is not active, (2) meets infrequently, (3) doesn’t serve in an advisory capacity, or (4) includes limited stakeholders.

An active advisory board meets at least quarterly to set policies, develop resources, and advise the Program of Study. It includes representation from several involved stakeholders, including employers, educators, and community partners.

An active advisory board meets monthly to set policies, develop resources, and advise the Program of Study. It includes representation from involved employers, students, parents, higher education and community partners, pathway staff, and district and site administration.













Pathway: Lead: School: District:

2. Engaged Learning

In supportive learning communities, students meet technical and academic standards and college entrance requirements through real-world applications, integrated project-/problem-based instruction, authentic assessments, and work-based learning.



Criteria #

Criteria Not Met

Criteria Met

Criteria Exceeded

Existing Evidence for Student Outcomes/ Certification Criteria

Self Assessment*


Priority**


2.1 Standards-Aligned

Curriculum

2.1.1. Academic core


The academic curriculum is not rigorous enough to lead to student mastery on standardized tests or other authentic assessment measures.

The academic curriculum is aligned to state standards and designed to lead to student mastery on standardized tests as well as on more authentic assessment measures.

The academic curriculum is aligned to state standards and demonstrated to lead to student mastery on standardized tests as well as on more authentic assessment measures.










2.1 Standards-Aligned Curriculum

2.1.2. Technical core



The technical courses either (1) are limited to fewer than three courses or (2) are not aligned to state CTE or industry standards.

A sequence or cluster of three or more technical courses (or their equivalent) is aligned to state CTE standards and/or industry standards.

A sequence or cluster of six or more technical courses is aligned to state CTE standards and/or industry standards. Multiple sequences offer specialization options for students.










2.2 Preparation for Postsecondary Options

2.2.1. Postsecondary preparatory curriculum



The pathway Program of Study does not adequately prepare students for success—without remediation—in California’s community colleges, universities, apprenticeships, and other postsecondary programs.

The pathway Program of Study prepares students for success—without remediation— in California’s community colleges, universities, apprenticeships, and other postsecondary programs.

As evidenced by several years of data, the pathway Program of Study prepares students for success—without remediation—in California’s community colleges, universities, apprenticeships, and other postsecondary programs.










2.2 Preparation for Postsecondary Options

2.2.2. Technical component



A sequence or cluster of technical courses either (1) consists of fewer than three courses, (2) delivers basic or advanced industry knowledge and skills, but not both, (3) does not adequately emphasize industry-related knowledge and skills, or (4) does not use authentic applications.

A sequence or cluster of three or more technical courses delivers basic and advanced industry knowledge and skills. The focus is on preparing youth for high-skill, high-wage employment by emphasizing industry-related knowledge and skills, using authentic applications that bring learning to life.

A sequence or cluster of six or more technical courses delivers basic and advanced industry knowledge and skills. The focus is on preparing youth for high-skill, high-wage employment by emphasizing industry-related knowledge and skills, using authentic applications that bring learning to life.










2.3 Real-World Relevance

2.3.1. Real-world relevance




Attempts at delivering academic core courses using career-related applications either lack authenticity or lower student expectations.

Academic core courses deliver standards- based content through authentic, career- or industry-related applications. Pathways alter how core academic subjects are taught; they do not lower expectations about what is taught.

Academic core courses deliver standards-based content through complex, authentic, career- or industry-related applications. Students interact regularly with industry partners. Student assessment incorporates both academic and industry standards.










2.4 Integrated Curriculum

2.4.1. Multidisciplinary integrated curriculum



Use of inquiry-based instruction is not yet common practice among many pathway teachers and/or regular teachers. This approach actively fosters student development of communication and teamwork skills, among other Habits of Mind, SCANS, and 21st-Century Skills.

Pathway teachers commonly use inquiry- based instruction that enables students to experience authentic theme-based situations that require integrating knowledge and skills from several disciplines. This approach fosters communication and teamwork skills, among other Habits of Mind, SCANS, and 21st- Century Skills.

A good portion of the pathway curriculum is delivered through inquiry-based instruction that enables students to experience authentic theme- based situations that are integrated and multidisciplinary. Through this approach, students master communication and teamwork skills, among other Habits of Mind, SCANS, and 21st-Century Skills, which are assessed and reported.










2.4 Integrated Curriculum

2.4.2. Curricular alignment



There is relatively little curricular alignment across disciplines and/or grade levels.

Teachers collaborate within and across disciplines and grade levels to provide students with a coordinated, coherent curriculum.

Teachers use formalized processes and structures to collaborate within and across disciplines and grade levels to provide students with a highly coordinated, coherent curriculum.










2.5 Instruction and Assessment

2.5.1. Project-/Problem-based approach



Pathway students may participate in multidisciplinary projects, but they are either infrequent, include few disciplines, or are brief (i.e., days).

Each year, pathway students participate in at least two extended (2- to 4-week) multidisciplinary projects that integrate academic and technical course content. Additional projects are planned or in development.

Each year, pathway students participate in several extended multidisciplinary projects that integrate academic and technical course content.










2.5 Instruction and Assessment

2.5.2. Authentic assessment



Pathway teachers rely almost exclusively on traditional or standardized assessments to measure student success, and they make little effort to design and use more authentic assessments.

To complement traditional or standardized student assessments, pathway teachers periodically design and use a variety of assessments to gain an accurate understanding of student learning. Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate skills and knowledge through real-world application.

To complement traditional and standardized student assessments, pathway teachers regularly design and use a variety of assessments to gain an accurate understanding of student learning. Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate mastery of skills and knowledge through real-world application.










2.6 Work-Based Learning (WBL)

2.6.1. Coordinated, sequenced, and scaled work-based learning (WBL)



Work-based learning (WBL) experiences are available to a limited number of pathway students. Plans are being developed to expand these opportunities.

Pathway offers one or more WBL experiences to a large percentage of pathway students. Pathway has plans and resources to substantially expand WBL experiences in the next year or two so that they become more coordinated, sequenced, and scaled.

Pathway offers real-world learning opportunities to all pathway students through a 4-year coordinated and structured sequence of WBL experiences that progresses in duration and intensity and increases student expectations and independence.










2.6 Work-Based Learning (WBL)

2.6.2. Connected to academic and technical coursework



Students are left to their own devices

to make connections between WBL experiences and classroom learning.



At least in limited ways (e.g., through reflection), WBL experiences do not occur in a vacuum: they are connected to and reinforce classroom learning.

In an intentional and structured way, WBL experiences and classroom learning mutually reinforce one another.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.1. Supportive atmosphere




Pathway promotes personalization through limited size, teacher teamwork, and/or strong student- teacher relationships, but not necessarily all three.

Pathway maintains personalization through limited size, teacher teamwork, and strong teacher-student relationships. Students feel supported.

Pathway maintains personalization through limited size, teacher teamwork, and strong teacher-student relationships. Students feel supported, highly valued, and part of a family.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.2. Student engagement



Pathway staff attempt to create, but have not fully succeeded in doing so, a culture where students are actively engaged in their learning.

Pathway staff consciously and consistently work to create a culture where students are actively engaged in their learning, both in and out of the school setting.

Evidence suggests that staff have succeeded in creating a culture where students are actively engaged in their learning, both in and out of the school setting.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.3. Differentiated instruction



Daily instruction may be differentiated by some teachers some of the time, but doing so is based on individual teacher training and inclination, rather than pathway staff collaboration and coordination.

In a somewhat routine way, daily instruction is designed with the knowledge that students vary in their preferred method of gaining information, understanding ideas, and demonstrating mastery. Some pathway teachers use multiple methods of presenting course content and assessing student learning to address each student’s learning needs.

Through formalized processes, daily instruction is designed with the knowledge that students vary in their preferred method of gaining information, understanding ideas, and demonstrating mastery. All pathway teachers regularly use multiple methods of presenting course content and assessing student learning to address each student’s learning needs.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.4. Academic intervention



Academic interventions are emerging and serve the needs of some students, but more must be done to address a range of needs for students.

Pathway students performing below grade level are supported by a range of services, which may include supplemental instruction, tutoring, credit recovery, before- and/or after- school programs, and academic support programs.

Pathway students performing below grade level are supported by a range of services that, to the extent possible, are provided within the pathway and use the pathway’s theme to motivate and engage students in learning. Evidence has demonstrated that these interventions have yielded substantial gains in student achievement.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.5. Guidance and counseling



Pathway students are served by counselors, but they may be assigned alphabetically or by grade level, rather than by pathway.

Pathway has a designated counselor who knows pathway students and is familiar with the unique characteristics and needs of the pathway. The counselor participates actively in pathway team meetings.

Pathway has a designated counselor who knows pathway students well and is familiar with the unique characteristics and needs of the pathway. The counselor participates actively in pathway team meetings. The counselor plays a lead role in recruiting students, coordinating interventions, and aligning course selection and WBL experiences with student interests, among other roles.










2.7 Support Services and Personalization

2.7.6. College and career planning



Each pathway student has a 4-year pathway Program of Study, but it may neither extend down to middle school nor ahead to postsecondary education, training, and career pursuits.

Each pathway student has a multiyear college and career plan that is informed by a range of college and career planning activities, extends through high school, and guides decisions about postsecondary education, training, and career pursuits.

Each pathway student has an 8- to 10-year college and career plan that establishes a throughline from middle school career exploration activities to postsecondary degree attainment and career pursuits. It is informed by a robust set of college and career planning activities.













Pathway: Lead: School: District:

3. SYSTEM SUPPORT

District policies and practices provide leadership, support, and resources to establish and sustain quality pathways.



Criteria #

Criteria Not Met

Criteria Met

Criteria Exceeded

Existing Evidence for Student Outcomes/ Certification Criteria

Self Assessment*


Priority**


3.1 District Policies

3.1.1. Pathway choice, equity, and access



Students are expected to attend their local high school. District and/or school policies and practices do not yet offer pathway of choice or placement equity.

District and school policies and procedures at least allow students to choose pathway options (within the school) and promote equity in placement of students in pathways. The district is addressing issues of school choice and transportation to ensure cross- district choice, equity, and access.

A range of district, school, and pathway policies and procedures support pathway development, implementation, and sustainability, including allowing students to choose pathway options; ensure equity in placement of students in pathways; and ensure that transportation issues do not preclude students from participating in the pathway of their choice.










3.1 District Policies

3.1.2. Recruitment and hiring practices



Administrators tend to assign pathway teachers without ample consideration of unique pathway staffing needs.

District and site administrators do what they can to meet the needs of pathway teams through recruitment, hiring, and retention of pathway teachers, but district policies and procedures do not yet guide these practices in a systemic way.

District policies and practices value the recruitment, hiring, retention, and evaluation of pathway team members, as well as the need for pathway staff stability that supports ongoing pathway maturation and sustainability.










3.1 District Policies

3.1.3. Accountability and autonomy



District policies hold school sites and pathways accountable for improving student outcomes, and in doing so may mandate certain curriculum, instructional methodologies, pacing, and scheduling that is neither consistent with nor supportive of a pathways approach.

District policies hope that pathways will improve student outcomes, and allow for some degree of site and pathway autonomy in determining the curriculum, instructional methodologies, pacing, and scheduling that will result in reaching those outcomes.

District policies hold school sites and pathways accountable for improving student outcomes, but allow for substantial site and pathway autonomy in determining the curriculum, instructional methodologies, pacing, and scheduling that will result in reaching those outcomes.










3.2 Leadership

3.2.1. Support from school board and superintendent



Pathways develop in spite of the system, rather than with district support. As long as pathways are yielding student achievement gains, district administrators allow current functioning.

District leaders support pathways and protect their current level of functioning, but may neither serve as champions nor align resources, policies, and procedures to promote pathway quality and sustainability.

The district Board of Education and Superintendent are champions of a pathways approach, publicly endorse it, offer active support, and align resources, policies, and procedures to promote pathway quality and sustainability.










3.2 Leadership

3.2.2. Support from site leadership



The high school principal and other administrators do not get in the way of pathway development and are willing to support pathway funding, facilities, staffing, and scheduling, when these activities do not conflict with other site priorities. Site leaders may have limited understanding of and commitment to pathways.

The high school principal and other administrators generally support the pathway and cooperate to help secure funding, facilities, staffing, scheduling, and support. Site leaders have a common understanding of, vision for, and commitment to pathways and their potential to improve student outcomes.

The high school principal and other administrators publicly advocate for the pathway and are actively involved in its funding, facilities, staffing, scheduling, and support. Site leaders have a common understanding of, vision for, and commitment to pathways and their potential to reduce high school dropout rates, raise student achievement, increase high school completion and postsecondary transition, and boost students’ earning power.










3.3 Professional

Development

3.3.1. Teacher professional development


The district requires participation in professional development activities that may not be consistent with the needs of pathway teachers and may limit teacher participation in professional development that is better aligned with their needs.

Site and district administrators support training for pathway teachers that is aligned with their self-identified needs. Support may be demonstrated by allocating resources, granting release time, and promoting a team approach.

Site and district administrators provide or help arrange training for pathway teachers in areas central to pathway quality, such as curricular integration, project-based teaching strategies, student support, and employer involvement.










3.4 Qualified Staff

3.4.1. Skilled teachers



The site principal either (1) does not acknowledge that pathway teachers must possess a unique set of skills and proficiencies or (2) does not set priorities for assigning, hiring, and retaining qualified teachers in the pathway.

The site principal acknowledges that successful pathway teachers must possess a unique set of skills and proficiencies, in addition to those required of all teachers. He or she hires and/or assigns qualified and willing teachers to fulfill these roles.

The site principal works collaboratively with pathway teacher leaders to actively recruit and hire uniquely qualified pathway staff that possess a unique set of skills and proficiencies. Policies and/or practices are in place to keep the pathway team of teachers together to promote pathway quality and sustainability.










3.4 Qualified Staff

3.4.2. Teacher leader/pathway coordinator



The pathway lacks effective leadership and/or staff assigned to perform these functions and is not allocated ample time to do so effectively.

A pathway teacher has agreed to serve as the pathway leader/coordinator that is responsible for all pathway administrative and facilitative functions. The pathway lead has ample time to effectively perform these functions.

A pathway teacher has agreed to serve as the pathway leader/coordinator that oversees pathway administration. A distributed leadership model involves many/most pathway staff in clearly defined leadership functions.










3.5 Partnerships 3.5.1. Active employer and community partnerships

Partnerships may exist, but they may be mismanaged, intermittent, and of limited value or depth, and/or serve in roles that do not directly affect student learning.

The pathway has several strong partnerships with local employers, community groups, and individuals. These partners are actively involved in the pathway in a variety of capacities that might include serving as project mentors to students, being guest speakers, hosting field trips, and working with students doing service learning projects. Both through the advisory board and other interactions, there is evidence of a healthy partnership between the pathway/high school and its host community.

The pathway has many formalized partnerships with local employers, community groups, and individuals. These partners voluntarily share responsibility for program effectiveness and student outcomes. A well-developed system has been designed to manage partnerships and ensure their effectiveness.













Pathway: Lead: School: District:

4. EVALUATION AND ACCOUNTABILITY

A systemic evaluation process documents the pathway’s impact on high school achievement and postsecondary success and drives the pathway’s continuous improvement plans.



Criteria #

Criteria Not Met

Criteria Met

Criteria Exceeded

Existing Evidence for Student Outcomes/ Certification Criteria

Self Assessment*


Priority**


4.1 Student Data

4.1.1. Data collection and reporting



The pathway’s data collection efforts are insufficient to describe pathway participants, make comparisons to the demographics of the school and district, and/or to report on students’ performance on a variety of outcome measures.

The pathway regularly collects, analyzes, and accurately reports student assessment data including those necessary to describe pathway participants (e.g., grade level, gender, race/ethnicity), to make comparisons to the demographics of the school and district, and to report students’ performance on a variety of outcome measures.

The pathway has a system in place to regularly collect, analyze, and accurately report student assessment data including those necessary to describe pathway participants (e.g., grade level, gender, race/ethnicity), to make comparisons to the demographics of the school and district, and to report students’ performance on a variety of outcome measures.










4.1 Student Data

4.1.2. College and career readiness data



Collection and analysis of data that indicate student readiness for college and career may be inadequate, inconsistent, inaccurate, or incomplete. As such, these data would not serve to examine evidence of impact.

The pathway annually collects, analyzes, and reports (to at least its advisory board) on some available indicators of both college and career readiness, which may include a-g completion rates, college enrollment data, SAT data, GPAs, CST scores, CAHSEE pass rates, graduation and dropout rates, pathway completion rates, occupational certification, proficiency through demonstration, completion of and grades in capstone technical courses, and end-of-course exams.

The pathway has a system in place to annually collect, analyze, and report formally and broadly on many available indicators of both college and career readiness (see list in column to the l










4.2 Pathway Evaluation

4.2.1. Evidence of impact



The pathway either (1) does not conduct any analysis of pathway data, (2) does not use that analysis to make programmatic decisions and inform instruction, or (3) cannot demonstrate that the pathway retains its students and improves student performance.

Annual analysis of pathway data is used to make programmatic decisions and inform instructional practice. This analysis demonstrates that the pathway retains its students and that the pathway improves performance on at least a few indicators of student achievement and readiness for college and career.

Ongoing, regular analysis of pathway data is used to make programmatic decisions and inform instructional practice. This analysis clearly demonstrates that the pathway retains its students and improves performance on most, if not all, indicators of student achievement and readiness for college and career.










4.2 Pathway Evaluation

4.2.2. Periodic review and improvement plan



Assessment of pathway functioning may be informal or anecdotal, neither based on hard data, completed in coordination with the advisory board, nor refer back to the pathway’s underlying mission and goals.

Pathway staff annually assesses the pathway’s functioning. These annual reviews result in the development of an improvement plan, whose action items refer back to the pathway’s underlying mission and goals.

Pathway staff and advisory board regularly and formally assess the pathway’s functioning. These periodic reviews result in the development of an improvement plan, whose action items refer back to the pathway’s underlying mission and goals.










4.2 Pathway Evaluation

4.2.3. Postsecondary tracking



Prior to students’ graduation, pathway staff collect students’ self- reports of their postsecondary plans, but the data indicate that pathway students do not continue to postsecondary education and training at high rates.


Prior to students’ graduation, pathway staff

collect students’ self-reports of their postsecondary plans. Data indicate that pathway students continue to postsecondary education and training at rates higher than school site, district, and/or state averages.



Pathway staff conduct a formal follow-up of students for several years after high school graduation and use data collected for continuous improvement of the pathway. Data provide clear evidence that stated outcomes have been met.












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