Welcome Message – Dr. Harter


Examples of District Match



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Examples of District Match


  • Smaller class size

  • Extra preps for Academy Coordinator(s) and teachers

  • Release time for curriculum development, program planning, and team building

  • Counselor assignment for supplemental Academy-only activities or smaller counselor-to-student ratio than other counselors

  • Additional staff and administrative hours spent on CPA events/needs that are not provided for other programs/students

  • Staff development, in-services, and workshops related to the Academy

  • Transportation for field trips, to postsecondary classes, to internships, and job shadowing locations

  • Program activities applied using any part of another grant (Perkins, Smaller Learning Communities, Agriculture Incentive Grant, Prop 1D, etc.)

  • Administrative time specifically applied to supporting/coordinating the Academy

  • Substitute costs to support program activities

  • Equipment purchased for the academy

  • Instructional and classified assistants for academy-only projects that are over and above normal workload.

  • A Partnership Academy Regional Occupation Program (ROP) class can be counted as a district match if the funding for this class is allocated from the district and if the ROP class is Academy-pure, meaning that it is being offered to only academy students as a class for the Partnership Academy.

Section VII – Academy Operations



Section VIII – Working with ConnectEd California

ConnectEd is the District Partner in Linked Learning implementation, and provides resources and professional development for pathway teams and educational leaders. This section will provide a collection of resources developed by ConnectEd for their District Partners.

Pathway Community of Practice Continuum (Draft, 2012)



Pathway Community of Practice Continuum – Collaborative Team Cycle of Inquiry and Improvement
Collaborative teams in Linked Learning pathways can use this tool to understand the design of high quality, outcome-aligned performance tasks and units of instruction and the creation of a collaborative culture of continuous improvement, to assess current status as a learning-focused community of practice, to set specific goals, to reflect on progress and the results of their efforts, and to identify support needs.


Identifying and Using Learning Outcomes

Academic and CTE teachers work with colleagues on their pathway team, and with district and industry partners, to create clear pathway, course and project outcomes aligned with academic content, Common Core and CTE standards. These outcomes guide their pathway’s program of study and their assessment, curricular and instructional planning.

(0)

Emerging (1)

(2)

Developing (3)

(4)

Sustaining (5)




Pathway outcomes…




Pathway outcomes…




Pathway outcomes...




include knowledge and skills from more than one domain: academic, career, or 21st century




include academic, career, and 21st century knowledge and skills




integrate academic, career, and 21st century knowledge and skills within the context of the pathway theme










align with either the school’s or district’s graduate outcomes.




align with both the school’s and district’s graduate outcomes










partially reflect the measurable performance level necessary for college and career readiness.




fully reflect Common Core and CTE standards, and the level of performance necessary for college and career readiness.










are partially articulated across the grade levels, forming progress benchmarks




are fully articulated across the grade levels through progress benchmarks




include some key standards




Include all key standards appropriate to the pathway




Include all key standards appropriate to the pathway




Implicitly inform the program of study, curriculum, instruction, and assessment




partially guide the design of the pathway’s program of study, instructional and assessment




fully drive the pathway’s program of study, instruction and assessment




Course and project outcomes are largely independent of pathway outcomes




50% of pathway teachers use pathway outcomes to drive curriculum and assessment through aligned course and project outcomes




100% of pathway teachers use aligned course and project outcomes to drive curriculum and assessment in single classes and across the pathway




School personnel can generally refer to pathway outcomes




School personnel can describe the pathways and explain generally how outcomes are supported within the program of study, curriculum, and assessment




Teachers describe how a specific skill or standard assessed connects to pathways outcomes




Students and industry partners can make general reference to pathway outcomes.




When asked, students can generally describe how their work addresses a pathway outcome.




Students can articulate where they are in the process toward outcome mastery



















Developing and Using Common Criteria and Rubrics:

Academic and CTE teachers collaborate with colleagues on their team, and with district and industry partners when appropriate to select the outcomes-aligned criteria and language in common rubrics that they will use to judge the quality of student products and performances.

(0)

Emerging (1)

(2)

Developing (3)

(4)

Sustaining (5)




Teachers design/adapt rubrics:




Teachers design/adapt common rubrics:




Teachers design/adapt common rubrics:




that are checklists that describe task completion





with quantitative criteria language that does not address task complexity and quality of student work




with descriptive language to address task complexity and quality of student work as a means to show learning




that are project-specific, typically in isolation from each other




that are aligned to pathway, school, or district outcomes




that are aligned to pathway, school, and district outcomes




are independent of pathway outcomes




that are aligned to key standards




that are aligned to key standards





that they write by themselves in isolation




in collaboration with colleagues




with help from students and industry partners
















that, when appropriate, are validated by industry partners as representing what it means to perform well for that criteria










to score one or two tasks with shared criteria




use more than two common tasks that are designed to score multiple tasks with shared criteria





  • as a formative learning tool for students




as a formative learning tool for students




which students use them for self-assessment and to assess anchors/exemplars in order to internalize quality criteria and levels


Designing Assessment Tasks:

Academic and CTE teachers, collaborate with industry and other partners to design authentic performance assessment tasks for projects and courses by which students will demonstrate their progress towards and defend their mastery of course, pathway and district graduate outcomes, as measured on common rubrics.

(0)

Emerging (1)

(2)

Developing (3)

(4)

Sustaining (5)




Performance assessment tasks:




Performance assessment tasks:




Performance assessment tasks:




are designed by a single teacher for individual classroom use.




are designed by an interdisciplinary teacher team for application in multiple subject areas




are designed by the interdisciplinary teacher teams with industry partners for application in multiple subject areas




are aligned to project-specific rubrics




are aligned to pathway outcomes and common rubrics




are intentionally aligned to pathway outcomes and common rubrics, mindful of past patterns of student learning










lead to a culminating event at the course level or grade level




lead to a culminating event at the course level or grade level with clearly aligned to pathway outcomes




are designed to have students complete a performance task once and their grade is recorded




are designed to have students receive feedback about a task and have at least one opportunity to revise and reflect upon their work




allow students to have multiple opportunities to revise and perform the task and reflect upon their progress toward pathway outcomes










provide some, but not all of the following information: knowledge, materials, timeline, parameters, product or performance




provide clear instructions, including the knowledge and materials needed, timeline, and models of performance or product students are to create










provide a somewhat realistic context





provide as realistic a context as possible










provide some differentiated access to task, though some aspects may be more difficult for some students to obtain




comprise a system of scaffolded and rigorous performance assessments that culminate in a clear body of work that shows demonstration of mastery of all aspects of the pathway’s grade level benchmarks at the end of the year




that culminate with the class or teacher as audience





include an internal audience or consequence in the design of performance assessments




ensure quality by:

    • including a broader audience or client beyond the school

    • requiring some form of public exhibition

    • requiring critique by teachers as well as students and external industry partners using a shared set of rigor and quality indicators

Designing Units of Instruction:

Academic and CTE teachers collaborate with industry and other partners to design integrated units of instruction that reflect the five linked learning behaviors of learning and teaching (BLTs) and through which students demonstrate proficiency on the performance assessment tasks as measured by the rubric.

(0)

Emerging (1)

(2)

Developing (3)

(4)

Sustaining (5)




Individual teachers:




Pathway teams:




Pathway teams:




design and implement single-discipline project-based units





collaboratively align and integrate themes and essential questions with either other academic disciplines or industry partners




collaboratively align and integrate themes, essential questions, multiple content areas and learning beyond the classroom (e.g. work-based learning) into the core of the multidisciplinary project




use elements of the Linked Learning Learning & Teaching Framework in the design of projects




partially align units of instruction to pathway outcomes





align units of instruction to the pathway outcomes, planning with the end in mind.





assess student work upon culmination of student learning




develop formative assessments while teaching the unit to monitor student learning




develop in advance formative assessments to be used at specific points throughout the unit to monitor learning




design units with discipline-specific projects




link the design of project based units of instruction to the expectations of the performance assessments




design the units so students get practice and have support meeting the demands of the performance task.










some modeling of proficient performances or products provided for students




ensure units provide exemplars/anchors to inform students and teachers about what “good” looks like




use their own instructional strategies to support student mastery of course outcomes




begin to discuss and project teams try shared instructional strategies




collaborate and agree to use shared instructional strategies throughout the entire pathway and collect data on implementation and impact of strategies
Designing Formative Assessments to Monitor Learning:

Pathway teachers design short-cycle formative assessments to be used during their units of instruction to (a) identify students who need additional time and support for learning; (b) use patterns in student learning to discover strengths and weaknesses in curriculum and our individual teaching; and (c) measure individual and common progress toward pathway outcomes and key standards, (d) provide corrective feedback to students so they can revise and refine their work

(0)

Emerging (1)

(2)

Developing (3)

(4)

Sustaining (5)



Teachers monitor learning:



Teachers monitor learning:



Teachers monitor learning:



sporadically during the task or lessons



before the end of a task through formative assessments



by using formative assessments to note progress toward the end outcomes and plan the next action to address student learning needs



at the end of a task or a set of lessons through quizzes or tests



by collecting data that measures daily instruction and informs of student progress towards culminating outcome



by collecting data from formative assessments and by involving students in self-assessment to understand their progress toward the end outcomes, their learning needs, and plan their next action



and view the data it yields as an indicator of student learning only



to note their strengths and weaknesses in the curriculum and in their teaching



by using the results of formative assessments to improve the curriculum and their teaching












in order to revise their units of instruction by incorporating feedback from all of the stakeholders (students, industry partners, pathway co-teachers)



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