Warm-up Get out your original folktales so you can turn them in



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Warm-up Get out your original folktales so you can turn them in.

  • The Fox and the Stork
  • At one time the Fox and the Stork were on visiting terms and seemed very good friends. So the Fox invited the Stork to dinner, and for a joke put nothing before her but some soup in a very shallow dish. This the Fox could easily lap up, but the Stork could only wet the end of her long bill in it, and left the meal as hungry as when she began. "I am sorry," said the Fox, "the soup is not to your liking." "Pray do not apologise," said the Stork. "I hope you will return this visit, and come and dine with me soon." So a day was appointed when the Fox should visit the Stork; but when they were seated at table all that was for their dinner was contained in a very long-necked jar with a narrow mouth, in which the Fox could not insert his snout, so all he could manage to do was to lick the outside of the jar. "I will not apologise for the dinner," said the Stork: "One bad turn deserves another."

Turn ItIn Instructions

  • www.turnitin.com – Create student account
  • Class ID Numbers:
  • 1st: 4187904
  • 2nd: 4187906
  • 3rd: 4187907
  • 4th: 4187909
  • Password: atascocita

Academic Format

  • First and Last Name
    • Mrs. Ryan
    • English I Pre-AP - 1 (1 is the period)
    • 14 September 2010 (notice no punctuation / abbreviations)
    • Double Spaced (even your heading)
    • One Inch Margins (have to go in and change manually; FILE – PAGE SETUP)
    • Last name and page number on top right 1/2 inch from the top.
    • No extra space between paragraphs (just begin a new line)
    • Left Justified – Don’t center your lines or stretch them out!
    • Times New Roman 12 pt font (including title!)

Long Works/Short Works

  • Italics if the work is long (novels, plays, epic poems, albums, movie titles)
  • “Quotes” if the work is short (poems, short stories, essays, song titles)
    • A Long Way Gone
    • A Long Way Gone (or underline if you are handwriting, A Long Way Gone)
    • The Lady or the Tiger
    • “The Lady or the Tiger” 

Academic Language

  • No “You” EVER!!!!!! (Unless it’s in a quote)
  • No first person EVER (Unless it’s in a quote)
  • “I think…” “We learn…” “The story teaches us…”
  • Remove these phrases from your writing!
  • No contractions, slang, casual conversational language
  • Always refer to the action of the story in present tense (When Ishmael kills a man for the first time, he completes his transition from childhood to manhood.)

The Prompt

  • Before writing anything, know your assignment— READ THE PROMPT! What are you being asked to do?
  • Response-to-Literature Writing=
  • writing that discusses what is of value in a work of literature.
  • Literary Response requires a careful, critical look at the reading.

What is my Prompt?

  • In a well developed, 5 paragraph essay, identify the character, describe how he or she is affected by a single act or mistake, and explain how the character’s experience relates to the work as a whole.
  • So, what should you focus on in your essay?
  • Brainstorm: What single act do you plan to focus on?

Intro Paragraph

  • At least three mature sentences
  • Introduces the text and the author
  • Creates interest (the hook)
  • Ends with a thesis statement (controlling idea of the paper)
  • Your paper’s ideas 
  • The reader 

Introductory Hooks

  • Draws in the reader
  • Tone should match the essay (serious, humorous, etc.)
  • Introduces the text you will be talking about
  • Possibility: Start with a quote from the book or an outside source that relates to the chosen theme
  • Another example: A Long Way Gone is a memoir written by Ishmael Beah, relating his experiences as a child soldier in Sierra Leone.

Thesis Statements (yay!)

  • Definition:
    • A single declarative sentence that expresses what you want your readers to understand; the controlling idea of your essay and road map for your paper
    • Directly answers the prompt
    • Makes a claim that others could refute
    • Last sentence of your introduction (for now…)

Thesis Statement Examples

    • In A Long Way Gone, the single event that truly impacts Ishmael is the first time he kills a man because it reveals important change in his personality, causes him to mature, and impacts the meaning of the entire novel. 
    • There are many events that impact Ishmael’s life. 
    • In the end, opening up to Esther was the single most important act in Ishmael’s life because it allowed him to heal, it opened the door to many opportunities, and it impacted the meaning of the entire novel. 
    • I think going to rehab was a good idea for Ishmael

What’s Your Thesis?

Finding Evidence

  • Quotes should be only one sentence. We will be trimming them down even further later. Don’t forget to write down the page #!
  • What scenes prove your theme? What is a powerful sentence from that scene?

Blending Quotes

  • Choose only a portion of the quote and blend it in with your own analysis.
  • Don’t include tons of summary or set-up. Your audience (me!) knows the plot already.
  • Ishmael character is clearly impacted by killing his first rebel as he describes how he “angrily pointed [his] gun into the swamp and killed more people” (Beah 119).

Internal Documentation

  • Changing a word in the quote to fit the context of your sentence requires brackets. The sentence’s meaning should not change.
  • Documenting internally – Always at the end of the sentence, not right after the actual quote.
  • Commentary “quote quote” (Author last name page #).
  • Commentary “quote” commentary (author’s last name page number).

Step 1: TOPIC SENTENCE

  • A Topic Sentence (TS) is the top bun of a hamburger.
  • TS = first sentence of the paragraph.
  • It shows the main idea.
  • Usually a mildly controversial
  • statement--something that you have to
  • prove.

Example Topic Sentence (TS)

Step 2: CONCRETE DETAILS

  • Concrete Details (CD) are the meat of the hamburger.
    • CDs = Support for your TS. (facts, quotes, examples, etc. from text)
  • CDs can’t be argued with—a CD is evidence that supports your point!

Example Concrete Detail (CD)

  • 2) For example, remembering his mother’s warning about a wolf, he builds his house out of sturdy brick. (Summary)

Step 3: COMMENTARY

  • Commentary Sentences (CM) are the “extras” on the hamburger—the tomato, cheese, lettuce, mayo—they make it delicious!
  • CMs = your analysis, interpretation, explanation, or insight into the text.

Example Commentary Sentences (2 CMs)

Step 4: CONCLUDING SENTENCE

  • A concluding sentence (CS) is the bottom bun of the hamburger.
  • A CS wraps up the paragraph.
  • It rephrases the main idea.

Example Concluding Sentence (CS)

  • In conclusion, the third
  • pig outsmarts not only his
  • brothers but the “big, bad”
  • wolf as well.

TS, CD, CM, CS—Now What?

  • CHUNKING
  • For a literary response, we will use a combination (or “ratio”) of 1:2. That is, for every 1 CD, you will have 2 CMs.
  • A combination of CDs and CMs is called a chunk.
  • One Chunk: 1 CD + 2 CM
  • For example, remembering his mother’s warning about a wolf, he builds his house out of sturdy brick. Because the wolf is unable to blow down the house, the reader is able to see that the third pig made the right choice. The third pig is smarter than his brothers, who were both eaten by the wolf.
  • Ratio = 1:2

Transitions

  • A good paragraph will also use transition words. These are words or phrases that help readers connect your ideas.
  • Example transitions:
  • For example,
  • For instance,
  • Consequently,
  • Thus,
  • As a result,
  • Because of this,
  • In summary,
  • Hence,
  • Therefore,

Does It Flow?

  • Reread the paragraph to yourself (out loud is best!) Does it make sense? Does it sound right?

Step 6: A Whole Paragraph

  • In the fairy tale “The Three Little Pigs,” the third pig is very wise. For example, remembering his mother’s warning about a wolf, he builds his house out of sturdy brick. Because the wolf is unable to blow down the house, the reader is able to see that the third pig made the right choice. The third pig is smarter than his brothers, who were both eaten by the wolf. In conclusion, the third pig outsmarts not only his brothers but the “big, bad” wolf as well.


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