Visiting Students course outline booklet 2015-2016 Visiting Student Academic Co-ordinator



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(Semester 1)



ENG242.I

MODERNIST FICTION

Dr. Adrian Paterson


This seminar course considers the radical prose of two of the twentieth century’s finest writers, Katherine Mansfield and Virginia Woolf. Their innovations in technique and in perception revolutionized the short story while their rivalry and mutual influence spurred Woolf to conceive a new shape for the novel. While reading closely and conducting a detailed analysis of narrative form and prose style, we will be considering key questions such as war, ego, science, time, sex, gender, audience, and empire. We will also consider the place of genre and length in bringing about change in modernist fiction, and the role of essays and diaries in forming new kinds of narrative. Active class participation is encouraged and demanded. Texts: Virginia Woolf, To The Lighthouse (Oxford), Orlando (Oxford); Katherine Mansfield, The Collected Stories (Penguin).

Assessment: 30% continuous assessment, including class participation and shorter written work; 70% final essay.

1 only

Tuesday 3-5

TB306 Tower 2



EN3113.II

MODERNIST FICTION

Dr. Adrian Paterson


This course will explore major works of global modernist fiction from about 1900 to 1940. As we read, we will cast a critical eye on accounts of modernism that present it as a retreat into aesthetic experimentation or an elitist cultural sphere. Instead, we will seek to understand literary modernism as a movement that embraces and insists upon the world, and that is formed by means of global encounters and exchanges. As we examine how modernist writers construct cosmopolitan identities through their short stories and novels, the formal and aesthetic innovations of modernism will provide invaluable maps of the global. Ultimately, our goal will be to understand modernism not only as a set of aesthetic and political responses to empire, colonialism, and war, but also as a series of related ways of imagining global community.

Texts: Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (1902); Lu Xun, “Diary of a Madman” (1918); Katherine Mansfield, “The Garden Party” (1922); Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse (1927); Mulk Raj Anand, Untouchable (1935).



Assessment: 30% continuous assessment, including class participation and shorter written work; 70% final essay.


2 only

Tuesday 3-5

TB306 Tower 2



ENG243.I/

ENG243.II

SPECIAL TOPIC

Women, Writing, and World Literature
Sorcha Gunne

This module offers an introduction to a selection of world literature by focusing on gender and globalization in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. We will examine the ways in which texts mediate between local conditions and literary forms, particularly in relation to gender, confronting a (prospectively) global audience. The module has been arranged into 5 units of intellectual debate and the works will be read comparatively, in relation to one another, and as contributions to particular literary and cultural traditions. We will question the categories of ‘women’s writing,’ ‘global literature,’ and ‘the West vs the Rest.’ We will also ask: what it means to read texts in the ‘world-language’ of English; how literary forms and strategies ‘travel;’ what are the potentials and limitations of comparative analysis; and how we might think of texts not only in relation to nations but also in relation to world-systems.


Reading list includes:

Anita Desai, Village by the Sea (1982)

Nawal El-Saadawi, Love in the Kingdom of Oil (2001)

Toni Morrison, A Mercy (2008)

Nami Mun, Miles From Nowhere (2009)

Monica Ali, Brick Lane (2003)

Melissa Hill, All Because of You (2007)

Angela Makholwa, The 30th Candle (2009)


Assessment: 30% continuous assessment, 70% final essay


1 and 2

Friday 9 – 11

TB306 Tower 2



EN3103/

EN3104

LITERATURE OF THE INTERNET

Dr. Justin Tonra


This seminar examines the ways in which the internet has influenced the structures, themes, and contents of recent literature. A survey of the history and development of the internet and the world wide web will form the basis from which students will examine two distinct but related ways in which the internet has influenced literature. First, the class will consider the structural influence of the internet on literary narratives and poetics by reading born-digital hypertext poetry and fiction and their print antecendents. Second, students will study recent works of literature with a thematic focus on the internet, and analyse authors’ descriptions of how the internet has shaped and changed human behaviour and communication. Students will ultimately synthesise the perspectives from these two strands to form a greater understanding of how a new technology has influenced the age-old practice of literature. Authors featuring in this course will include Jorge Luis Borges, Raymond Queneau, Michael Joyce, Ara Shirinyan, and Dave Eggers.  Assessment: 30% continuous assessment; 70% final assignment.

1 and 2

Thursday 1 -3

AMB G043 Seminar Room



(Semester 1)

Thursday 1-3

AC203 Lecture Room

(Semester 2)


EN607.I/

EN607.II


WILLIAM LANGLAND’S PIERS PLOWMAN

Dr. Cliodhna Carney


In England in the fourteenth century a man named William Langland, about whom very little is known, wrote an extraordinary, disturbing and ambitious poem. Piers Plowman is a vast, alliterative, allegorical dream-vision, whose subject is nothing less than greed, corruption, the reform of the clergy, virtue, sin and salvation. This course will comprise an intensive reading of the first seven passus of the poem, which together form a coherent sub-section of the whole. Text: William Langland, The Vision of Piers Plowman: A Critical Edition of the B-Text, ed. A. V. C. Schmidt, 2nd ed. (New York, NY.: Everyman, 1995).

Assessment: 30% continuous assessment (4 short written assignments: 20% (i.e. 4 x 5%); one panel discussion: 5%, one debate: 5%) and one long end-of-term essay: 70%.


1 and 2

Tuesday 1-3

TB306, Tower 2



(Semester 1)

Tuedsay 11-1

Room 302, Tower 1

(Semester 2)




EN609.I/

EN609.II


Masculinity and Crisis

Rebecca Barr


This course will examine the representation of men, masculinity and cultural change in a selection of twentieth-century novels. While first wave feminist criticism made the study of gender an integral part of literary studies, it is only relatively recently that critics have begun to interrogate and analyse representations of masculinity in literature. This course will examine novels by American, English, and Irish authors that depict men and masculinity at moments of personal or historical crisis. We will look in detail at the differing forms these crises take, and the ways in which authors use the form of the novel to articulate and develop responses to changing roles of men. 


1 and 2

Thursday 3-5

TB306, Tower 2



(Semester 1)

Monday 3-5

S202, Block S

(Semester 2)



EN435.I/

EN435.II


Modern American Poetry

Sean Ryder

This seminar examines a diverse range of experimental poetry from American poets of the late twentieth- and early twenty-first centuries. Themes to be discussed include: poetic language, politics, originality, gender issues, and the role of poetry in contemporary culture.
The course text is: Paul Hoover, ed., Postmodern American Poetry, 2nd edition (Norton, 2013). 
Assessment: 30% continuous assessment, 70% final essay.


1 and 2

Wednesday 1-3

TB306, Tower 2

(Semester 1)
Wednesday 1-3

S202, Block S (Semester 2)





EN3117/

EN3118


Representing Ireland in the 1970s

Lionel Pilkington


This module discusses the relationships between Irish writing and politics in a crucial decade of Ireland's 20th century modernisation. A selection of novels, poetry and plays will be considered by means of close readings, seminar discussion and some independent archive-based research. Special attention will be given to Seamus Heaney’s Wintering Out (1972) and North (1975), Brian Friel's The Freedom of the City (1973), John Banville's Birchwood (1973), John McGahern's The Leavetaking (1975).


1 and 2

Tuesday 11-1

S202, Block S




EN3119/

EN3120


Technology and Culture

Andrew Ó’ Baoill



Does technology shape society, or do our social structures drive how technology develops? What do we mean by 'new media' and how does it differ from 'old' media forms? There are numerous schools of thought on how to properly understand the interplay of technology and culture, from McLuhan's claim that "the medium is the message" to various forms of social constructivism. In this class, we will explore these issues drawing on contemporary case studies and the work of a range of influential thinkers, including Marshall McLuhan, Nancy Baym, Manuel Castells, and Henry Jenkins.
Assessment: 30% Continuous Assessment and 70% Final Assignment


1 and 2

Monday 3-5

Room 302, Tower 1



ENG247.I


Samuel Richardson Clarissa

Rebecca Barr (sem 1 only)


This is a seminar in extreme reading. Students will study Samuel Richardson’s 'Clarissa'; the most important (as well as the longest) novel of the eighteenth century. In its plot of a young girl’s resistance to an arranged marriage, her rape at the hands of a rake and her subsequent death, Richardson’s controversial work produced a storm of admiration and shock. The novel's unremitting representation of sexual aggression and analysis of the human heart raises crucial questions about textual interpretation and morality that continue to have implications for contemporary readers, writers and critics. Topics for discussion will include the novel in letters, the first-person voice, literature and the law, sexuality, madness in literature, and deconstructionist theory and reader response.

1 only

Tuesday 9-11

S202, Block S



(Semester 1)

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