Visiting Students course outline booklet 2015-2016 Visiting Student Academic Co-ordinator



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Code


Seminar Title

Semester available

Venue





EN336.I/

EN336.II

BECKETT ON PAGE & STAGE: PROSE, POETRY, DRAMA

Dr. David Clare


Samuel Beckett’s work is often described as ‘ahistorical’ and as being set ‘nowhere’. In keeping with a recent shift in Beckett criticism, however, this module seeks to place Beckett’s work in socio-historical context. Close analysis of the works is employed to reveal the depth of Beckett’s lifelong engagement with the landscape and culture of his native Ireland. Students will discover the degree to which Beckett’s early work is critical of Free State Ireland and narrow definitions of Irishness. They will learn that Beckett’s later work is often set in a ‘liminal space’, with Beckett superimposing the countries where he lived in later life (England and France) over the Ireland of his youth; Beckett does this in order to subtly explore the psychological effects of exile, which is itself a very ‘Irish’ preoccupation. Other topics covered in discussions include narrative and dramatic experiment, Beckett’s play with genres, and the developments in his style between the early 1930s and the 1980s.
Assessment: 30% continuous assessment (class participation, one oral presentation and one, brief written assignment); 70% final essay.

1 and 2

Tuesday 3-5

Room 302 Tower 1



EN404.I/

EN404.II

CONTEMPORARY IRISH POETRY

Dr. Adrian Paterson


This course traces the enormous variety of streams and tributaries in Irish poetry after Yeats, with a particular emphasis on the poems and poets of mid-century and how they influenced later writers.  Exploring local and contemporary contexts, the focus is carefully drawn on close readings of the most interesting poems.  This allows for discussion of exciting work from a range of known and lesser-known authors, including Louis MacNeice, Samuel Beckett, Austin Clarke, Denis Devlin, Patrick Kavanagh, and John Hewitt, considering in detail their influences and after-effects.  Text: Modern Irish Poetry: An Anthology, ed. Patrick Crotty (Blackstaff Press), Coursebook.
Assessment will take into account the quality of class participation and two brief written assignments (30%), and a longer final essay (70%).


1 and 2

Thursday 1-3

Room 302 Tower 1



EN3109/

EN3111

POETRY OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR

Ms. Kirry O’Brien


This seminar engages with the poetry of World War 1, a poetry written by men and women, combatants and non-combatants, at home and at the front. It examines how literature helped prepare people for war and sustained them through it. It also looks at the production of mythologies which still inform our understanding of the Great War.
Assessment: 15% class presentation write up, 15% for mid-term review/close reading of a poem or poster from the period and 70% final essay.


1 and 2

Monday 11-1

S202, Block S



EN3110/

EN3112

POETRY OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR

Ms. Kirry O’Brien


This seminar engages with the poetry of World War 1, a poetry written by men and women, combatants and non-combatants, at home and at the front. It examines how literature helped prepare people for war and sustained them through it. It also looks at the production of mythologies which still inform our understanding of the Great War.
Assessment: 15% class presentation write up, 15% for mid-term review/close reading of a poem or poster from the period and 70% final essay.


1 and 2

Wednesday 11-1

Room 302 Tower 1



EN426.I/

EN426.II

AMERICAN WAY OF DEATH

Prof. Daniel Carey


The seminar focuses on factual and fictionalised accounts of murder in America, asking why violence is a central part of American culture and the literary imagination. Texts include Truman Capote, In Cold Blood, Norman Mailer, The Executioner’s Song, Mikal Gilmore, Shot in the Heart, William Maxwell, So Long, See You Tomorrow.
Assessment: One presentation and commentary (30%) and 70%: two essays at 35% each.

1 and 2

Wednesday 5-7

Room 302 Tower 1




EN434.I/

EN434.II

STUDIES IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY FICTION

James Joyce's Early Fiction
Dr. Irina Ruppo
This course will examine James Joyce’s first novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and some of his short stories. We shall consider various conflicting approaches to the texts and develop new interpretations through class discussions and debates. Texts: James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Araby’; The Dead’; ‘An Encounter’.
Assessment: 10% participation, 20% two short written assignments and 70% for final essay.


1 and 2

Friday 1-3

Room 302 Tower 1





EN442.II

VICTORIAN LITERATURE
Dr. Muireann O’Cinneide
This seminar explores the influence of imperialism and colonialism on the fiction of the Victorian period (1832-1901). It discusses the dynamics of colonial power and racial hierarchies that underlay literary encounters with ‘foreignness’ in and out of England). Authors include Wilkie Collins, Joseph Conrad, Rudyard Kipling, Olive Schreiner, Robert Louis Stevenson, and H.G. Wells. Main Texts: Elleke Boehmer, ed. Empire Writing: An Anthology of Colonial Literature 1870-1918; Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone (1868); H. G. Wells, The War of the Worlds (1898); Rudyard Kipling, Kim (1901).
Assessment: 30% continuous assessment (15% individual in-class presentation; 10% written assignment; 5% in-class participation exercises); 70% final essay.

2 only

Tuesday 1-3

Room 302 Tower 1



EN448.I/

EN448.II

STORIES TOLD AND RE-TOLD

Dr. Irina Ruppo


The course examines authors’ use and adaptation of folkloric and mythological material in their works.  The course examines a variety of early modernist and contemporary texts alongside earlier materials alluded in or explored by those texts.  Straddling the perceived divide between popular fiction and classic literary works, the course considers the writing of W. B. Yeats, minor authors of the Irish Revival, J.R.R. Tolkien, James Joyce, John Updike, and Douglas Adams.  The course enables students to query the nature of literary production and reception across different time periods. It allows them to explore why authors choose to underpin their works by references to well known narratives, and, conversely, why authors choose to revive forgotten legends.
Assessment: 10%: class participation; 20%: two short assignments; 70%: final paper (2500 words).


1 and 2

Tuesday 1-3

S202, Block S




EN459.I/

EN459.II

CONTEMPORARY IRISH WRITING

The Fantastic in Irish Writing

Dr. Irina Ruppo


The course will consider the use of the fantastic mode in Irish writing across a variety of genres. It will explore the novels of John Banville and Clare Boylan, the drama of Marina Carr, and the short fiction of Neil Jordan and Éilís Ní Dhuibhne and ask the questions how these writers use the fantastic mode to explore contemporary social issues and to engage with and challenge the Irish literary tradition. Texts: A number of short stories by Éilís Ní Dhuibhne and poems by Matthew Sweeney, Pat Boran, and others will be distributed in class. Longer texts are Clare Boylan, Black Baby (1988), Marina Carr, By the Bog of Cats (1998), John Banville, The Sea (2005) and Neil Jordan, Sunrise with Sea Monster (1994).

Assessment: participation 10%, 2 written assignments 20%, and final essay 70%.


1 and 2

Thursday 11-1

Room 302 Tower 1

(Semester 1)
Friday 11-1

Room 302 Tower 1

(Semester 2)


EN464.I/

EN464.II

NEGOTIATING IDENTITIES

Dr. Leo Keohane and Ms. Aingeal Ní Chualáin


This course provides an introduction to twentieth-century Irish writing and considers how writers in Irish and in English have participated in the negotiation of modern and contemporary Irish identities. Through a close critical reading of key selected texts in Irish and in English, it will investigate the ways in which writers have imagined and re-imagined Ireland and Irishness from the literary and cultural revival of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries through to the new millennium. Issues to be addressed will include Ireland’s transition from a traditional to a modern society, language, gender, and the connections between literary production and the imagined ‘nation’. A knowledge of Irish is not necessary for this course.

Assessment: 30% continuous assessment: class participation, oral presentation and abstract for final essay. 70% for 2 essays; one (25%) and the final essay (45%).


1 and 2

Friday 11-1

Seminar Room, Centre for Irish Studies



EN470.I/

EN470.II

OLD ENGLISH I – INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE AND READING

Francisco Rozano Garcia


Old English is an exciting and beautiful language. Apart from being an invaluable object of study to those with an interest in etymology, it is the vehicle for some of the most challenging and captivating literature you will ever read.  This course will provide you with a thorough introduction to learning to read Old English without painful memorisation! We’ll think about many important theoretical issues related to engagement with the language and its texts, and we’ll explore the culture of the Anglo-Saxon people. Texts: Robert Hasenfratz and Thomas Jambeck’s Reading Old English.

Assessment: Weekly assignments 30% (five assigned, best three chosen); Essays 70% (two short essays assigned, worth 35% each).

1 and 2

Monday 1-3

TB306 Tower 2





EN3101/

EN3102

ALLUSION, ADAPTATION AND APPROPRIATION

Dr. Lindsay Reid


Works of literature are always in dialogue with texts that came before; they inevitably recall and comment on the past even when presenting something ‘new’. Using case studies from world literature alongside critical secondary readings, this module focuses on the intertextual relationships that exist between and inform our understandings of literary works. Drawing on a wide variety of short texts, our case studies may include examinations of such topics as: how later literary pieces like ‘The Story of Sindbad the Sailor’ from The Arabian Nights or Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s ‘The Lotos-Eaters’ build on famed episodes from Homer’s Odyssey; how contemporary short stories by feminist authors such as Angela Carter or Margaret Atwood revise and critique classic fairy tales; how subsequent poets have responded to the sentiments and form of Shakespeare’s sonnets; and/or how particular characters from Greco-Roman mythology, such as Pygmalion or Orpheus, have been variously reinterpreted by authors from the Middle Ages to today.
Assessment: 30% continuous assessment and 70% final essay.

1 and 2

Friday 3-5

Room 302 Tower 1



EN599.I/


LITERARY COMPOSITION

Dr. John Kenny


Please note: This seminar is not available to students of the BA with Creative Writing
This module will introduce you to a number of related ‘non-academic’ professional modes and genres of literary writing. On a workshop basis, you will develop writing and project skills as they apply in creative composition in the traditional genres of poetry, drama and fiction and also as they apply in various critical forms (cultural reporting; articles and profiles; the personal essay; literary journalism in both senses: books journalism, and nonfictional essay-writing). As a group, we will explore how the critical and creative dispositions can cooperate in the actual production of written work, and the concept and practice of style will be extensively examined. You will emerge with a working knowledge of the processes of self- and group-editing, of the importance of producing ‘clean’ and individualised script, of the combined imperatives of information and entertainment in the kinds of writing aimed at a wide audience.

Assessment: Participation: 20%, minor writing projects: 10%; major writing project: 70%.

1 only

Tuesday 1-3

IT203 IT Building

(Sem 1)


ENG230.I/

ENG230.II

NINETEENTH CENTURY DETECTIVE FICTION

Dr. Coralline Dupuy


The focus of this course is a selection of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. The critical tools used in class features structuralism, psychoanalysis, colonial and gender studies.

Reading list: Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet 1887 (Oxford UP); Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes 1891 (Oxford UP); Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles 1901 (Oxford UP); Arthur Conan Doyle, The Final Problem 1893 (Oxford UP).



Assessment: At-home assignment 15%, in-class presentation 15%, two essays at 35% each (70%).


1 and 2

Monday 11-1

Room 302 Tower 1

(Semester 1)
Wednesday 1-3

TB306 Tower 2

(Semster 2)


EN3105/

EN3107

TWENTIETH-CENTURY CHILDREN’S FICTION

Dr. Coralline Dupuy


The focus of this course is an in-depth analysis of modern novels for children written in the last three decades. The proposed method of study is comparative analysis. The critical theories used in this purpose are Jungian psychoanalysis, structuralism and gender studies. Through this course, the students will be asked to appraise each text individually and also to look at the general issues pervading the genre. These include family politics, the role of imagination, ethics, and mentors. Reading list:  Roald Dahl, The Witches (1983, Puffin Books). Louis Sachar, Holes (1998, Bloomsbury). Neil Gaiman, Stardust (1998, Headline). S. F. Said, Varjak Paw (2003, Corgi). Assessment: At-home assignment 15%, in-class presentation 15%, mid-term essay (35%) and a final essay (35%).


1 and 2

Wednesday 11-1

TB306 Tower 2



EN3106/

EN3108

TWENTIETH-CENTURY CHILDREN’S FICTION

Dr. Coralline Dupuy


The focus of this course is an in-depth analysis of modern novels for children written in the last three decades. The proposed method of study is comparative analysis. The critical theories used in this purpose are Jungian psychoanalysis, structuralism and gender studies. Through this course, the students will be asked to appraise each text individually and also to look at the general issues pervading the genre. These include family politics, the role of imagination, ethics, and mentors. Reading list:  Roald Dahl, The Witches (1983, Puffin Books). Louis Sachar, Holes (1998, Bloomsbury). Neil Gaiman, Stardust (1998, Headline). S. F. Said, Varjak Paw (2003, Corgi). 

Assessment: At-home assignment 15%, in-class presentation 15%, mid-term essay (35%) and a final essay (35%).



1 and 2

Friday 11-1

S202 Block S




ENG232.I/

ENG232.II

AFRICAN FICTION

Dr. Fiona Bateman


This seminar will focus on writing from and about Africa. We will read and discuss novels as well as other texts from Nigeria, Zimbabwe and Kenya. Issues to be considered will include language and the oral tradition, postcoloniality, tradition and modernity, gender, landscape and politics. Reference to texts by both African and non-African writers will enable analysis of contrasting narrative styles and representations. Texts: Chinua Achebe Things Fall Apart (1958); Ngugi wa Thiongo The River Between (1965); Tsitsi Dangarembga Nervous Conditions (1988); and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Americanah (2013).

Assessment: 30% for continuous assessment (one short piece of written work and one presentation, 15% each) and 70% for the final essay.



1 and 2

Friday 9-11

Room 302 Tower 1




ENG233.I/

ENG233.II

ARTHURIAN LITERATURE

Dr. Dermot Burns


The main text under consideration on this course is Sir Thomas Malory's Morte d'Arthur, the first major prose narrative in English literature, which attempts to tell the complete story of the rise and fall of the legendary King Arthur. Our study will include the perusal of a broad range of secondary texts concerning medieval chivalry, including chivalric treatises, religious texts, other medieval romances and pseudo-historical chronicles, in order to place Malory's work within the context of a range of medieval views on knightly virtue and behaviour. Major themes including religion, love, honour and courage will be considered in light of the striking events described in Malry’s rendition of the Arthurian legend.

Assessment: 30% Continuous Assessment (1 mid-term essay) and 70% Final In-class Essay.


1 and 2

Monday 1-3

Room 302 Tower 1




ENG235.II

DIGITAL HUMANITIES

Dr. Justin Tonra


Computers have played an increasingly prominent role in humanities research and study in recent years, but as literary scholars, we have not given adequate attention to the effects of this paradigm shift on what we study and how we study. In this class, we will explore a range of topics from the intersection of computing and literary studies, such as: what is digital humanities? How have computers been used to study literature in the past and present? How has technology shaped and changed our reading patterns? Though computers have expedited many traditional scholarly tasks, how can we improve our analysis and insight through tasks that only a computer can perform? The course will demonstrate the fundamentally interdisciplinary nature of digital humanities, though our practical focus will be on literary texts. Classes will be divided between and lab, and students are expected to have a good degree of digital literacy. Students must have access to a laptop computer for each class. Core texts include Siemens & Schreibman, eds. A Companion to Digital Literary Studies.

Assessment: 30% continuous assessment; 70% final assignment.


2 only

Tuesday 2-4

IT206




ENG240.I/

ENG240.II

LITERARY HISTORIES

Dr. Victoria Brownlee


This course assesses the shaping influence of particular historical junctures on four early modern plays, Thomas Dekker’s Whore of Babylon, Shakespeare’s Henry V and The Merchant of Venice, and Elizabeth Cary’s The Tragedy of Mariam. By engaging with extracts from a variety of contemporaneous documents, we will locate the issues raised in these plays amid broader discussions of Catholicism, kingship and nationhood, Jewishness, and femininity in early modern England. Through this comparative scrutiny of the intricate interactions of text and context, seminars will elucidate how literary writings reinforce and undermine dominant political and social attitudes, and assess the difficulties inherent in reading history.
Assessment: 30% continuous assessment (one oral presentation (10%), and one written assignment (20%)); 70% final essay.


1 and 2

Monday 3-5

S202, Block S

(Semester 1)
Tuesday 9-11

S202, Block S



(Semester 2)


ENG241.I

LOOSE BAGGY MONSTERS

Victorian Serial Fiction

Dr. Richard Pearson


Unique to their period, but founding a cultural format of serial consumption still present in soap operas and serial dramas today, the 20-month part-issue novel challenges modern assumptions about the neat and well-made text. Henry James referred to such novels as ‘loose, baggy monsters’. This seminar will focus on a close week-by-week reading of Charles Dickens’ novel, Bleak House (1852-53). We will explore the issues raised by an unfamiliar form of writing and reading, and exmaine the essential elements of serial narrative and the central figure of the narrator. We will also study how these novels shape themselves as commodity-texts and encode the politics of economic exchange and consumption in areas such as gender and class relations. Finally, the seminar will explore how the disturbing ‘monstrosity’ of these texts – their excess, loss of control, and engagement with what lies beneath the veneer of Victorian respectability – is expressed.

Set text: Charles Dickens, Bleak House (Penguin).



Assessment: portfolio (30%), final essay (70%)


1 only

Monday 11-1

TB306 Tower 2


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