Use creative imagination Focus on nature Importance of myth and symbolism



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  • Use creative imagination
  • Focus on nature
  • Importance of myth and symbolism
  • Focus on feelings and intuition
  • Freedom and spontaneity
  • Simple language
  • Personal experience, democracy and liberty
  • Fascination with past
  • What Is Romanticism?
  • Changing political and social conditions
  • Reaction against Industrial Revolution
  • Revolt against Enlightenment and literary styles
  • Working long hours in dangerous factories
  • Development of modern cities
  • Trends
  • Trends
  • Interest in chaos and nature
  • Changing religious views
  • Rebellion against authority
  • Crime, madness, suicide
  • Neoclassic Trends
  • Stressed reason and judgment
  • Valued society
  • Followed authority
  • Maintained the aristocracy
  • Interested in science and technology
  • Revolt Against Neoclassicism
  • Romantic Trends
  • Stressed imagination and emotion
  • Valued individuals
  • Strove for freedom
  • Represented common people
  • Interested in supernatural
  • John Constable: British landscape artist
  • George Walker: English painter
  • Joseph Mallord William Turner: English watercolorist
  • Art Reconceived
  • Constable
  • Turner
  • Théodore Géricault: French painter
  • Eugène Delacroix: French painter
  • William Blake: poet, painter, engraver, illustrator
  • Art Plumbs Emotional Depths
  • Conveys freedom and individuality
  • New ways of producing musical instruments
  • Emotionally charged music popular
  • Musical Innovations
  • Music Greats
  • Beethoven
  • Chopin
  • Von Weber
  • Philosophers valued:
    • Art
    • The self
    • Creativity
    • Imagination
    • Jean Jacques Rousseau and Immanuel Kant: examples of such philosophers
  • Philosophers’ Views
  • Rousseau
  • Philosophers’ Views Widen
  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling
  • Von Goethe
  • Von Schelling
  • William Blake
  • William Wordsworth
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • George Gordon, Lord Byron
  • John Keats
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • Poets of the Romantic Era
  • Blake
  • Coleridge
  • Keats
  • Shelley
  • Wordsworth
  • Byron
  • Thoughts of British Romantic Poets
  • “…I will not reason and compare: my business is to create.” William Blake
  • “ Come forth into the light of things, Let Nature be your teacher.” William Wordsworth
  • “Examine nature accurately, but write from recollection, and trust more to the imagination than the memory.” Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Blake
  • Coleridge
  • Thoughts of British Romantic Poets
  • “Those who will not reason, are bigots, those who cannot, are fools, and those who dare not, are slaves.” George Gordon, Lord Byron
  • “What the imagination seizes as beauty must be truth.” John Keats
  • “Poetry lifts the veil from the hidden beauty of the world, and makes familiar objects be as if they were not familiar.” Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • Visions of ghostly and angelic figures
  • Possessed mystic “gift of vision”
  • Born in London November 28, 1757
  • Educated at home by mother
  • Enrolled in drawing school at age ten
  • William Blake
  • 1757-1827
  • Blake’s Education & Marriage
  • Apprenticed to engraver at 14
  • Completed apprenticeship at 21
  • Journeyman copy engraver for London publishers
  • Admitted to the Royal Academy of Art’s Schools of Design
  • Married Catherine Boucher
  • Blake Video
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  • Blake Unappreciated
  • Lived in poverty
  • Moved to Felpham, Sussex
  • Accused of assault and sedition
  • Final projects included illustrations and/or watercolors for others’ writings
  • Blake’s Death
  • Suffered from unknown sickness
  • Experienced stomach pain and chills
  • Died on August 12th, 1827
  • Buried in unmarked grave
  • Blake’s Works
  • Songs of Innocence
  • Songs of Experience
  • Poetical Sketches
  • The Marriage of Heaven and Hell
  • “The Lamb” and “The Tyger”
  • Most popular poem: “The Tyger”
    • “Did he who made the Lamb make thee?”
    • “What immortal hand or eye,/Dare frame thy fearful symmetry”
  • Companion poem to “The Lamb”
    • “Little Lamb, who made thee?/Dost thou know who made thee?”
  • single click speaker to hear audio clip >>>>
  • William Wordsworth
  • 1770-1850
  • Born in Cockermouth, Cumberland, England
  • Mother died 1778
  • Attended St. John’s College, Cambridge
  • Had affair with Annette Vallon
  • “Vaudracour and Julia” for lover and daughter
  • Losses and Triumphs
  • Married Mary Hutchinson
  • Five children
  • Lived with sister Dorothy
  • Brother John died at sea
  • Lost friendship with Coleridge
  • Two children died
  • Granted honorary Doctor of Civil Law degrees
  • Wordsworth in Despair
  • Named Poet Laureate
  • Death of third child, Dora
  • Stopped writing poetry
  • Abandoned Romantic beliefs
  • Died in 1850 at Rydal Mount
  • Buried at St. Oswald’s Church, Grasmere
  • Wordsworth’s Works
  • Lyrical Ballads “Tintern Abbey”
    • Wordsworth used “real language of men”
    • Definition of poetry: “the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings from emotions recollected in tranquility”
  • An Evening Walk and Descriptive Sketches
  • An Evening Walk Video
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  • Works and Themes
  • Recurring themes in Wordsworth’s poetry
  • The Prelude
  • Poems in Two Volumes
  • The Lake Poets: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Southey
  • Tintern Abbey
  • Five years have passed; five summers, with the length Of five long winters! and again I hear These waters, rolling from their mountainsprings With a soft inland murmur. Once again Do I behold these steep and lofty cliffs, Which on a wild secluded scene impress Thoughts of more deep seclusion; and connect The landscape with the quiet of the sky.
  • Born October 21, 1772
  • Father was a parish vicar
  • Sent to London boarding school
  • Not allowed to return home for holidays
  • Attended Jesus College at University of Cambridge
  • Won Browne Gold Medal for ode
  • Samuel Coleridge
  • 1772-1834
  • Coleridge’s Errors
  • Left college to join 15th Light Dragoons
  • Reenrolled in college
  • Left without degree
  • Joined poet Robert Southey to build a Pantisocracy
  • Married Sarah Fricker
  • Unitarian minister
  • Opium, Travel & Transcendentalism
  • Friends with William Wordsworth
  • Started taking opium
  • Granted annuity of 150 pounds to write
  • Traveled to Germany with Wordsworth
  • In Germany: Coleridge studied German and Transcendentalism
  • Coleridge
  • Opium addiction
  • Lost friendship with Wordsworth
  • Lived with a apothecary for care
  • Died of heart failure
  • Coleridge’s Works
  • First publication: Poems on Various Subjects
  • Published Lyrical Ballads
  • Most famous works
    • “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”
    • “Kubla Khan”
    • Biographia Literaria
  • Day after day, day after day,
  • We stuck nor breath nor motion:
  • As idle as a painted ship
  • Upon a painted ocean.
  • Water, water, every where, And all the boards did shrink; Water, water, every where, Nor any drop to drink.
  • The very deep did rot: O Christ! That ever this should be! Yea, slimy things did crawl with legs Upon the slimy sea.
  • single click speaker to hear audio clip >>>>
  • Parents separated before his birth
  • Born in London
  • Named George Gordon Noel Byron
  • Born with club foot
  • Moved to Aberdeen, Scotland
  • Inherited family title at ten
  • George Gordon, Lord Byron
  • 1788-1824
  • Byron’s Early Years
  • Attended Aberdeen Grammar School, Harrow, and Trinity College, Cambridge
  • Kept a pet bear at Trinity College
  • Fell in love with choirboy John Edleston
  • John Edleston died
  • Byron wrote a series of elegies
  • Byron’s Exploits
  • Defended Roman Catholicism
  • Bragged about sex with women in Italy
  • Rumored incestuous relationship with sister
  • Byron’s Exploits
  • Married Anne Isabella Milbanke
  • Divorced Anne
  • Left England forever
  • Befriended Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • Created child in affair
  • Seduced Italian Countess Guiccioli
  • Gave 4,000 pounds to refit Greek fleet
  • Byron’s Death
  • Fell ill; remedy of bleeding caused fever
  • Greek national hero
  • Heart buried under tree
  • Westminster Abbey refused body
  • Monument in Westminster Abbey 145 years post-mortem
  • Byron’s Works
  • “Epigraph to a Dog”
  • Byron’s masterpiece: Don Juan
  • “She Walks in Beauty”
  • “Darkness”
  • Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage
  • She walks in beauty like the night
  • Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
  • And all that’s best of dark and bright
  • Meet in her aspect and her eyes:
  • Thus mellowed to that tender light
  • Which heaven to gaudy day denies.
  • single click speaker to hear audio clip >>>>
  • Born in London
  • Four siblings
  • Keats’ father died
  • Mother remarried two months later
  • Children sent to live with grandmother
  • Mother died of tuberculosis
  • John Keats
  • 1795-1821
  • Keats’ Medical Career
  • Apprenticed to apothecary/surgeon
  • Student at Guy’s Hospital
  • Wrote first poem
  • Became junior house surgeon and dresser
  • Qualified as apothecary
  • Quit medicine
  • Keats’ Video
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  • Writing, Relationships & Illness
  • Published Poems
  • Friend of Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • Brother George left for America
  • Brother Tom died of consumption
  • Fell in love with Fanny Brawne
  • Symptoms of tuberculosis
  • Traveled to warmer climate to recover
  • Keats’ Death
  • Died in Rome at 25
  • Buried in Protestant Cemetery in Rome
  • Tombstone reads: “Here lies one whose name was writ in water.”
  • Fanny Brawne mourning for years
  • Poetic career lasted 3.5 years
  • Keats’ Works
  • Endymion
  • Hyperion
  • “Ode on a Grecian Urn”
  • “Ode to the Nightingale”
  • “Ode to Autumn”
  • “The Eve of St. Agnes”
  • Ode to the Nightingale
  • My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains
  • My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk,
  • Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains
  • One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk;
  • Tis not through envy of thy happy lot,
  • But being too happy in thine happiness—
  • That thou, light-wingèd Dryad of the trees,
  • In some melodious plot
  • Of beechen green, and shadows numberless,
  • Singest of summer in full-throated ease.
  • single click speaker to hear audio clip >>>>
  • Born near Horsham in Sussex, England
  • Tutored at home
  • Attended Sion House Academy of Brentford
  • Educated at Eton College and University College at Oxford
  • First publication: Zastrozzi
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • 1792-1822
  • Shelley Video
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  • Shelley’s Exploits
  • Published The Necessity of Atheism
  • Eloped with 16-year-old Harriet Westbrook
  • Daughter named Ianthe
  • Often left wife and child
  • Met Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin
  • single click speaker to hear audio clip >>>>
  • Shelley’s Complicated Life
  • Left pregnant wife for 16-year-old Mary
  • Traveled to Switzerland
  • Claire pregnant with Byron’s child
  • Mary Shelley began working on Frankenstein
  • Shelley took Claire and daughter to Venice
  • Losses and Views
  • Son and daughter died
  • Wrote Adonais upon Keats’ death
  • Wrote essay on radical political views
  • Essay on vegetarianism
  • Believed in rights of all living things
  • Shelley’s Death
  • Drowned during storm at 29
  • Possibly assassinated
  • Body washed ashore
  • Wife kept Shelley’s heart
  • Shelley cremated on beach
  • Ashes buried in Rome
  • Shelley’s Works
  • “Ozymandias”
  • “Ode to the West Wind”
  • “The Masque of Anarchy”
  • “To a Skylark”
  • Prometheus Unbound
  • “Ozymandias” Video
  • single click screen
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  • Ode to the West Wind
  • O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being,
  • Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead
  • Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing,
  • Yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red,
  • Pestilence-stricken multitudes: O thou,
  • Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed
  • The wingèd seeds, where they lie cold and low,
  • Each like a corpse within its grave, until
  • Thine azure sister of the Spring shall blow.
  • Beyond poetry
  • Topics still popular today
  • Lasting impact
  • In Conclusion


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