Upper-division Writing Requirement Review Form (2/14)



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Upper-division Writing Requirement Review Form (2/14)


I. General Education Review – Upper-division Writing Requirement


Dept/Program
Subject

Wildlife Biology

Course # (i.e. ANTY 455) or sequence

  WILD 408

Course(s) Title

Advanced Fisheries

Description of the requirement if it is not a single course.

Wildlife Biology has a dispersed upper division writing requirement. This course is 1 of 3 required courses that serve as an option for the dispersed writing requirement (including BIOE 371 as a required component and two of the following options – BIOE 428, BIOO 320, BIOO 470, BIOO 475, WILD 470, WILD 408, and senior thesis WILD 499).


II. Endorsement/Approvals
Complete the form and obtain signatures before submitting to Faculty Senate Office.

Please type / print name

Signature

Date

Instructor

Lisa Eby




9/16/14

Phone / Email

5984

Lisa.eby@umontana.edu




Program Chair

Winsor Lowe







Dean

James Burchfield






III. Type of request


New




Renew

X

One-time Only




Change




Remove




Reason for new course, change or deletion

IV Overview of the Course Purpose/ Description


Fisheries management consists of three interrelated processes: fish populations, fish habitat, and people. This course introduces some of the fundamental principles and approaches of inland fisheries ecology and management. Through general readings and specific case studies we will explore the challenges of balancing multiple human values in managing fisheries resources. We will focus on understanding

  1. The drivers of change in fish populations,

  2. Quantitative nature of fish population assessment,

  3. Fish habitat requirements, impacts, and restoration,

  4. Harvest and other social/economic value of fisheries,

  5. Complexity of ecological interactions linking fish to other components of aquatic ecosystems and broader social community.




V Learning Outcomes: Provide examples of how the course will support students in achieving each learning outcome.

Identify and pursue sophisticated questions for academic inquiry

X Yes

If yes, how will student learning be supported?



Students are required to develop and communicate their own research questions for the grant proposal writing assignment. Students first orally present their questions and hypothesis and receive feedback. They then provide a written draft of their proposal and receive feedback from both students and the instructor. Finally, students rewrite their proposal based on feedback they receive.



 No

If no, course may not be eligible



Find, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize information effectively and ethically from diverse sources (see:
http://www.lib.umt.edu/library-information-literacy-tables#Table2) Subject liaison librarians are available to assist you embed information literacy into your course: http://www.lib.umt.edu/node/115#instructors

X Yes

If yes, how will student learning be supported?



Students are required to synthesize the existing scientific literature for their proposals and other writing assignments. This information must be appropriately cited. Most students are aware of the library databases and search engines by this time but I provide individual instruction to those who have not done these searches before. Citations must occur in a format consistent with fisheries and ecology journals.



 No

If no, course may not be eligible



Manage multiple perspectives as appropriate

X Yes

If yes, how will student learning be supported?



  1. We have several written assignments throughout the semester where we discuss a case study, review the management objective, use real data to analyze whether we are achieving the objective and finally write a summary of the objectives, whether they are being achieved and to make a recommendation for management.

  2. The students must write a 2 page (single-spaced) position paper (with citations) on a controversial topic. This topic may vary but have included, should FDA approve GMO salmon? Should cutthroat and rainbow hybrid fish be considered in ESA listing for cutthroat status?

In both cases consideration of different viewpoints in necessary for the assignment.

 No

If no, course may not be eligible



Recognize the purposes and needs of discipline-specific audiences and adopt the academic voice necessary for the chosen discipline

X Yes

If yes, how will student learning be supported?



In short assignments (reporting their analysis of case study wrap ups) and in the research proposal, a professional writing style is required.

Feedback is provided from the first assignment on a professional writing style.




 No

If no, course may not be eligible



Use multiple drafts, revision, and editing in conducting inquiry and preparing written work

X Yes

If yes, how will student learning be supported?


Student will be getting feedback on writing assignments throughout the semester, but without revision. Typically students are allowed to re-write one assignment throughout the semester to improve their grade. In addition, the proposals are reviewed by the instructor (Eby) and other students, revised, and resubmitted. I find that students benefit not only from revision, but also from reading others work and commenting on it.





 No

If no, course may not be eligible



Follow the conventions of citation, documentation, and formal presentation appropriate to that discipline

X Yes

If yes, how will student learning be supported?


Students are required to include literature citations in their assignments and research proposal. Feedback on documentation is provided prior to final proposal submission.





 No

If no, course may not be eligible


VI. Writing Course Requirements


Enrollment is capped at 25 students.
If not, list maximum course enrollment. Explain how outcomes will be adequately met for this number of students. Justify the request for variance.

Enrollment is capped at 25, but has not exceeded 20.



Briefly explain how students are provided with tools and strategies for effective writing and editing in the major.

In some years, Anne Green comes in to discuss writing styles. In all years, we spend 1 to 2 lectures discussing writing style and voice, phases of writing, components of a research proposal, and common mistakes to avoid.

Which written assignment(s) includes revision in response to instructor’s feedback?

Students are required to submit a draft research proposal. They receive feedback from the instructor and from other students. Students then revise their proposals for final submission.

VII. Writing Assignments: Please describe course assignments. Students should be required to individually compose at least 20 pages of writing for assessment. At least 50% of the course grade should be based on students’ performance on writing assignments. Quality of content and writing are integral parts of the grade on any writing assignment.

Formal Graded Assignments

Several assignments for case study evaluation, a research proposal, and an essay (see syllabus below)

Informal Ungraded Assignments

None

Paste or attach a sample writing assignment, including instructions for students.

Example writing assignment. Last Assignment: AquaAdvantage Salmon from AquaBounty Technologies
The AquAdvantage salmon founder animal was generated in 1989 by micro-injecting a recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) construct, opAFP-GHc2, composed of a promoter from an ocean pout antifreeze protein (AFP) gene and a protein-coding sequence from a chinook salmon growth hormone (GH) gene into the fertilized eggs of wild Atlantic salmon. Subsequent selection and breeding led to the establishment of the AquAdvantage salmon line, which has been propagated for eight generations. Under the conditions proposed for the NADA, AquAdvantage salmon would be produced as triploid, all-female populations with eyed-eggs as the product for commercial sale and distribution. These eggs would be produced in the sponsor’s facility on Prince Edward Island (PEI) in Canada. After confirming the genetic integrity of the broodstock used for manufacture and effective induction of triploidy in the eyed-eggs, these eggs would be shipped to a land-based grow-out facility in the highlands of Panama, where they would be reared to market size and harvested for processing. AquAdvantage salmon, is designed to exhibit a rapid-growth phenotype that allows it to reach smolt size (100 g) faster than non-GE farmed Atlantic salmon.

The FDA has to examine and approve this fish for human consumption. The FDA examines (1) safety of the rDNA construct to the animal; (2) safety of the food from the animal; (3) environmental impact; and (4) the extent to which the producers of GE animals (referred to as "sponsors") have met the claims made for those GE animals (effectiveness). In December the FDA released their findings of no significant effect, but then opened a comment period. Even though the comment period just closed, think about the criteria that the FDA uses for approval and write a short public comment regarding this approval given the criteria for FDA approval.

http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/NewsEvents/CVMUpdates/ucm339270.htm

Many of the arguments surrounding the production of genetically modified organisms are ethical, social, and/or economic issues (not under the direction of the FDA). Some folks are suggesting that there be some legislative action to either regulate the selling of GM salmon or require that they be labeled. Please comment on your opinion of this.

Your essay should be concise and the first part should be a comment to the FDA directly (as if it was going to be submitted to the FDA for review) and the second part (re: regulation) can follow. The entire document has a 2 page limit. It is due last day of class and we will have a discussion in class next Friday.

Please remember this is a persuasive essay so take a position and then support that position with an argument. I am looking for a well written essay, without spelling, grammar or use of English errors. The essay needs to be well organized, clear and present ideas in a coherent way. As with any essay, you need to have appropriate statements properly cited (e.g., you can’t say that rapid growth causes deformities without citing where that information comes from). References need to be effectively used, correctly cited and correctly listed in the reference list (not in page count).




VIII. Syllabus: Paste syllabus below or attach and send digital copy with form.

The syllabus must include the list of Writing Course learning outcomes above.



Paste syllabus here.

WILD 408 Advanced Fisheries Spring 2014

All students must practice academic honesty. Academic misconduct is subject to an academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the University. All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code. The Code is available for review online at: http://life.umt.edu/vpsa/student_conduct.php. Any students with disabilities will be accommodated.

Instructor: Lisa Eby, BRL 103, x5984, lisa.eby@umontana.edu (email is best)

Text: Hubert and Quist (eds). 2010. Inland Fisheries Management in North America. American Fisheries Society. 3rd edition. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland. You can buy this book through AFS (with member discount, $81) or two copies will be on reserve in the library to check out for a short time period to read assigned readings from the book. All of the addition readings are posted on the Moodle site.
Class time and location: MWF 12:10--1:00pm; JRH 204

Office hours: Tues 1:00pm-2:00pm, Thursday 12:00-1:00pm

Class description: Fisheries management consists of three interrelated processes: fish populations, fish habitat, and people. This course introduces some of the fundamental principles and approaches of inland fisheries ecology and management. Through general readings and specific case studies we will explore the challenges of balancing multiple human values in managing fisheries resources. We will focus on understanding

  1. The drivers of change in fish populations,

  2. Quantitative nature of fish population assessment,

  3. Fish habitat requirements, impacts, and restoration,

  4. Harvest and other social/economic value of fisheries,

  5. Complexity of ecological interactions linking fish to other components of aquatic ecosystems and broader social community.

This course, in combination with 2 others, fulfills the upper division writing requirement for Wildlife Biology majors. The UM upper-division writing requirement includes:



  1. Identify and pursue more sophisticated questions for academic inquiry, (2) Find, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize information effectively from diverse sources, (3) Manage multiple perspectives as appropriate, (4) Recognize the purposes and needs of discipline-specific audiences and adopt the academic voice necessary for the chosen discipline, (5) Use multiple drafts, revision, and editing in conducting inquiry and preparing written work, (6) Follow the conventions of citation, documentation, and formal presentation appropriate to that discipline, and (7) Develop competence in information technology and digital literacy.

Grading:

Proposal (20% of grade)

Short paragraph of idea due on March 12h, 3 copies of the full proposal due April 16th, Panel discussion on April 25th, Electronic reviews returned to author April 25th, and Revision due May 9th: The short paragraph of idea should include the general issue, specific questions, where study may take place, and what type of methods may you use to address the questions.

Proposals should be no longer than ten pages, including figures, tables, and a brief resume of the principal investigator. The following information must be provided: (a) Principal Investigator name & affiliation; (b) Title of project; (c) Description of project: this section should include a brief introduction to the problem, your specific objectives, your study plan; (d) Expected benefit/results of project to fish management; (e) Proposed project schedule and timeframe (not longer than 2 years for the entire project); (f) Biographical information. Each person must provide a brief resume summarizing his/her qualifications and experience; (g) Budget Table (no more than $75,000 for the two years), you need to include salary (# people, # days, hourly pay), fringe (12% of salary for people you employ less than 6 months, 30% of salary for people you employ for longer), supplies needed to perform the project, travel ($0.42/mile and any per diem), equipment use or rental (boat days, etc), and equipment repair. Turn in 3 copies of your proposal.

Review of the proposal will be performed by myself and others in the class (each person will review 2 proposals). Proposals will be evaluated on organization, writing, scientific/technical merit, feasibility, and benefits to fisheries management. Review sheets will be provided. Students will have a week to complete the review and turn it in at the panel discussion evaluating which proposals will be funded. The proposal grades are based on grading rubric not on whether your proposal gets funded.



Assignments (60%): Computational and written assignments associated with river, stream, and lake management sections will be passed out in class throughout the semester. There will be computational assignments associated with each case study. There are multiple assignments (as listed in syllabus). Students are free to discuss the assignment, but all final products (graphs and writing components of the assignments) must be prepared individually. All written material, calculations and graphs to be handed in must be your own work (answers must be in your own words). Assignments must be well-organized, well-written, and typed. Late papers and assignments: A 5% per day late penalty will be assessed unless prior arrangements are made.

Participation and Discussions (10%):

Come to class ready to participate in class. Local biologists associated with case studies will be speaking to the class and the Student Chapter of the AFS (Thursdays 6pm) - attendance at these two talks are mandatory. The additional talks from professionals at the Student AFS Chapter meetings will be relevant and are encouraged.

Professional and Scientific Exposure: You will have a choice to participate in multiple potential activities this spring. To get full points you will have to do one of the following (but if you are interested in fisheries, I recommend getting as much exposure as possible):

  1. Go to the MTAFS meetings. To get credit for this activity, talk to a professional about their work and job, and be in talks for one entire day (for documentation write up a short description of who you interacted with and about what (1 sentence) and describe 3 talks that you attended: objective, approach, findings, implications). Turn it in the week following the meetings. http://www.montanaafs.org/ State Chapter of the American Fisheries Society Meeting: March 4th through 7th

  2. Go to 3 seminars related to aquatic issues (seminars that count would include: AFS Chapter speakers that are not required for class, and select WBIO, IoE, or OBE seminars). To document this activity, you must write 1 short paragraph summarizing each seminar (objective, approach, findings, and implications). Turn it in within 1 week of the seminar or meeting. As seminar schedules are completed, I will try to announce appropriate seminars in class. Do not wait until the last week of classes as there may not be anything appropriate to attend.

    1. UM Student Chapter AFS meetings every other Thursdays 6pm, FOR 305

Bruce Farling, Executive Director of Montana Trout Unlimited Feb 6th

Ron Pierce, MFWP fisheries biologist Feb 20th (required)

Chris Downs, NPS fisheries biologist March 13th



Barry Hansen, CSKT tribal biologist March 27th (required)

Possibly Sam Mace April 24th


Final Exam (10%): The final exam for this course will review the major concepts that were covered during the entire semester. Final Exam is Tuesday May 13th 10:10-12:10. I will make previous final exams available.
Class schedule:

Week of Jan 27th

  • Introduction, course description & evaulation

  • History of fisheries management

  • Legal Process and Fisheries Management

    • Chapter 4 in Inland Fisheries Management


Week of Feb 3rd

  • Process of fisheries management

  • Chapter 5 in Inland Fisheries Management

Assignment 1 handed out: review management plan

  • Scale and Fisheries Management:

  • Fausch et al. 2002 Landscapes to Riverscapes: Bridging the Gap between Research and Conservation of Stream Fishes Bioscience 52:483-498.

  • Coldwater streams – characteristics and key habitat

    • Milner, N.J., J.M. Elliot, J.D. Armstrong, R. Gardiner, J.S. Welton, and M. Ladle. 2003. The natural control of salmon and trout populations in streams. Fisheries Research 62:111-125.


Week of Feb 10th

  • Populations, metapopulations & threats to fish populations in the Rocky Mountain region

  • Rieman, B.E., and J.B. Dunham. 2000. Metapopulations and salmonids: a synthesis of life history patterns and empirical observations. Ecology of Freshwater Fish. 9:51-64.

  • Connection versus isolation in the conservation of inland trout (Kellie Carim)

    • Fausch et al. 2009. Invasion versus isolation: trade-offs in managing native salmonids with barriers to upstream movement. Conservation Biology 23:859-870.

  • Exotics and the special case of hybridization

    • Allendorf et al. 2001. The problem with hybrids and setting conservation guidelines. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 16:613-622.

Assignment 2 handed out: dealing with cuttbows in the Rocky Mountain Region
Week of Feb 17th

Ron Pierce, MFWP fisheries biologist Feb 20th (required)

  • Monday 17th Presidents Day Holiday: No Class

  • Common techniques for habitat restoration in stream systems

    • Roni et al. 2008. Global review of the physical and biological effectiveness of stream habitat rehabilitation techniques. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 28:856-890

  • Complexities and Challenges of Managing Stream fish populations in the Blackfoot River Basin – the role or habitat restoration, regulations, changing conditions, and exotics

    • Pierce et al. 2013. Response of wild trout to stream restoration over two decades in the Blackfoot River Basin, MT. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 142(1).

Assignment 3 handed out: streams restoration assignment
Week of Feb 24th

  • Using harvest to alter the abundance of fishes in stream systems

    • Post et al. 2003. Can anglers influence the abundance of native and nonnative salmonids in a stream from the Canadian Rocky Mountains? North American Journal of Fisheries Management 23:109-119

  • Sampling in streams and rivers

    • Conquest, L.L. and S.C. Ralph. 1998. Statistical Design and Analysis Considerations for Monitoring and Assessment. Chapter 18, River Ecology and Management. Eds. R.J. Naiman and R.E. Bilby Springer Verlag, New York.

  • Common population measures for monitoring and assessments in stream

    • Chapter 11 in Inland Fisheries Management


Week of Mar 3rd

  • Monday: Finish sampling, discuss proposal ideas

  • No Class on Wednesday or Friday for the MT American Fisheries Society Meeting March 4th -7th


Week of Mar 10th

Assignment 4 Due: paragraph for proposal topic due March 12th

  • Population indices versus estimators: CPUE, depletion sampling & mark-recapture sampling

  • Science Writing and Components of a Proposal

  • Natural Lakes – Fisheries and strategies


Week of Mar 17th

  • Ecology and Management of lake foodwebs

    • Chapter 13 in Inland Fisheries Management (not online, in library)

    • Ellis et al. 2011. Long-term effects of a trophic cascade in a large lake ecosystem. Proceedings -of the National Academy of Sciences 108: 1070-1075

  • Case Study: Flathead Lake Case Study of Lake Trout Woes

    • Flathead Lake EIS (do not print – this is huge!) Just for reference!

http://flatheadlakeeis.net/Background/Background.html

    • Martinez et al. 2009. Western Lake Trout Woes. Fisheries 34:424-442

  • Creel surveys: data obtained & designs

  • Chapter 21 “Sampling the recreational fishery” in Fisheries Techniques


Week of Mar 24th

Barry Hansen, CSKT tribal biologist March 27th (required)

  • Introduction to population models & Estimating population parameters (mortality)

    • Chapter 2 in Inland Fisheries Management (mortality pages 43-55)

Assignment 5 handed out: Mortality estimates

  • Estimating population parameters (growth, fecundity)

    • Chapter 2 in Inland Fisheries Management (growth pages 55-58)

  • Estimating population parameters (recruitment)

    • Chapter 2 in Inland Fisheries Management (growth pages 58-62)


Week of March 31st Spring Break (March 31 – April 4th)
Week of Apr 7th

  • Population modeling approaches – framework and assumptions

    • Chapter 2 in Inland Fisheries Management (growth pages 62-77)

  • Population modeling

Assignment 6 handed out: Are we achieving our management goals?

  • Population modeling - Can we do anything about new invasions?

Chapter 8 in Inland Fisheries Management (not online, in library)
Week of Apr 14th

  • Wrap-up for Flathead Lake case study

Assignment 7 handed out: Dealing with new invasions.

  • Chapter 20 in Inland Fisheries Management (not online, in library)

  • Status, trends, and management in the Frasier River

    • Peterman. Decline of Fraser River Workshop (This is big! For reference)

http://www.psc.org/about.htm (Pacific salmon commission)

Week of Apr 21st

Review of students proposals due in class April 25th(Assign 8)

  • The Pacific Salmon Treaty and complexities for anadromous fishes

  • Use of cultured fish in fisheries management: focus on Frasier River

    • Noakes, D.J. 2011. Impacts of salmon farms on Fraser River sockeye salmon. Cohen Commission Tech. Rept. 5C. 113p. Vancouver, B.C. www.cohencommission.ca (This is big! For reference)

  • Panel Review of Proposals:


Week of Apr 28th

  • Understanding drivers of population change: FW stages

  • Understanding drivers of population change: Marine

    • McKinnell et al. 2011. The decline of the Fraser River sockeye salmon in relation to marine ecology. Technical Report 4 PICES Advisory Report Cohen Commission. (This is big! For reference)

  • Quantifying Impacts and evaluating stock

Assignment 9: Frasier River salmon stock assessment review
Week of May 5th

  • Quantifying Impacts and evaluating stock, wrap-up case study

  • In class debate (Assignment 10) The role of stocking in Pacific Salmon management, AquaAdvantage GMO fish, or fish stocking in wilderness areas?

  • Class Wrap-up, Final Revision of Proposals due last day of class 5pm


Final Exam is Tuesday May 13th 10:10-12:10
Important Dates for Spring Semester 2014:

To 15th

instructional day



Students can drop classes on Cyberbear

February 14 = last day

16th to 45th instructional day

Drop requires form with instructor and advisor signature, a $10 fee from registrar’s office, student will receive a ‘W’.

February 18 through April 7

Beginning 46th instructional day

Students are only allowed to drop a class under very limited and unusual circumstances. Not doing well in the class, deciding you are concerned about how the class grade might affect your GPA, deciding you did not want to take the class after all, and similar reasons are not among those limited and unusual circumstances. If you want to drop the class for these sorts of reasons, make sure you do so by the end of the 45th instructional day of the semester.

April 8

Students with Disabilities


The University of Montana assures equal access to instruction through collaboration between students with disabilities, instructors, and Disability Services for Students (DSS). If you think you may have a disability adversely affecting your academic performance, and you have not already registered with DSS, please contact DSS in Lommason 154 or 406 243 2243. I will work with you and DSS to provide an appropriate accommodation.

Student Conduct Code


All students must practice academic honesty. Academic misconduct is subject to an academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the University. All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code. The Code is available for review online at: http://life.umt.edu/vpsa/student_conduct.php

The student conduct code gives instructors the right to address plagiarism directly in their classrooms.


Grading Option


Please note, this class is offered for traditional letter grade only, it is not offered under the credit/no credit option.




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