Unit title: Animals are Characters, Too: Characters who Gallop, Bark, and Squeak



Download 119,69 Kb.
Date conversion26.05.2018
Size119,69 Kb.
UNIT TITLE: Animals are Characters, Too: Characters who Gallop, Bark, and Squeak

Conceptual Lens: This four to five-week unit invites students to compare how animals, especially horses, dogs, and mice, are portrayed in fiction and nonfiction texts.

Grade Level: Fourth

Author: commoncore.org/adapted by Randolph County Schools
Unit Overview: Students examine character development in depth by focusing on how animals and their traits are personified in literature and film. The teacher may choose to have students read varied texts about the same animals to facilitate a whole-group discussion, or to encourage students to read in small groups about different animals and compare and contrast what they learn about animal character development. Students choose an animal to research, comparing the research with humanly portrayed animals in literature. After reading selections from Scranimals by Jack Prelutsky or from The Book of Nonsense by Edward Lear, students also try their hand at writing a poem or limerick about an unusual animal. Students also begin writing their own narratives that incorporate the techniques and vocabulary studied with animal characters. If time permits, students may have the opportunity to compare how film and print versions of texts are similar and different from each other. Finally, this unit ends with a class discussion and essay response to the essential question.

Learning Experiences from Unit 3 Animals are Characters, Too: Characters who Gallop, Bark, and Squeak

Reading

Writing/Language

Additional Literacy

  • Determine the key details that support central ideas and themes within a variety of texts.

  • Locate and identify the textual evidence required for making logical inferences.

  • Read and discuss a variety of fiction and nonfiction texts about animals including horses, dogs, and mice.

  • Determine key details/idea to support central ideas and themes in fiction and nonfiction text.

  • Find similarities and differences in animal characters and how they are personified.

  • Read informational texts about animals, and create a Venn Diagram comparing factual information with fictional portrayals.

  • Participate in group discussions about the facts and fiction of animal characters.

  • Discuss and interpret poetic techniques and forms, such as rhyme scheme and limericks.

  • Write a variety of responses to stories and poetry.

  • Collaborate with classmates in order to publish their own animal story.

  • Explain major differences between poetry, drama, and prose.




  • Compare print and film versions of animal stories.

  • Recite poetry for classmates.




Fourth Grade

Unit Three/Quarter Two

Unit Standards

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

Reading

RL.4.1/RI.4.1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.


RL.4.5: Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

RI.4.2: Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarizes the text.


RI.4.7: Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time line, animations, or interactive elements on web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

RL.4.1 and RI.4.1

  • I can define inference and explain how a reader uses details and examples from a text to reach a logical conclusion (“based on what I’ve read, its most likely true that…”).

  • I can read closely and find answers explicitly in text (right there answers).

  • I can read closely and find answers that require an inference.

  • I can analyze an author’s words and refer to details and examples needs to support both explicit and inferential questions.

  • I can define inferences and explain how a reader uses direct quotes from a text to reach a logical conclusion (“based on what I’ve, it’s most likely true that …”)

  • I can read closely and find answers explicitly in text (right there answers).

  • I can read closely and find answers that require an inference.

  • I can analyze an author’s words and find details and examples to support both explicit and inferential questions.


RL.4.5

  • I can recognize that poems, drama, and prose (the ordinary language people use when speaking or writing) use different structural elements.

  • I can identify common structural elements of poems and dramas.

  • I can refer to the structural elements of a poem or drama when explaining their differences.


RI.4.2

  • I can define main idea (who or what a text is mainly about).

  • I can determine the main idea of a text.

  • I can identify key details in a text and explain how they support the main idea.

  • I can define summary (a shortened version of a text that states the key points).

  • I can write a summary stating the key points of a text.


RI.4.7

  • I can recognize that authors use various formats when presenting information.

  • I can identify information presented in formats (e.g., graphs, pictures, diagrams, charts, media clips) other words.

  • I can explain how various formats (e.g., graphs, pictures, diagrams, charts, media clips) help a reader understand the text.

What do good readers do?


Am I clear about what I just read? How do I know?

Author’s choice: Why does it matter?


What makes a story great?

What do good readers do?


Am I clear about what I just read? How do I know?

In what ways does creative choice impact an audience?


Whose story is it, and why does it matter?


Writing/Language

W.4.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. (a) Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; (e.g., headings) illustrations and multimedia when useful to aid comprehension.

W.4.6: With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of key- boarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.

W.4.8: Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize in- formation, and provide a list of sources.

W.4.2

  • I can select topic and gather information (e.g., facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, examples) to share with my audience.

  • I can define common formatting structures and determine the best structure that will allow me to organize my information.

  • I can introduce and organize my topic into paragraphs and sections that group related information.

  • I can use formatting structures, illustrations, and multimedia to clarify (make clear) my topic.

  • I can link my information (e.g., facts, definitions, details, quotations, examples) using words and phrases.

  • I can explain my topic using precise language and domain-specific vocabulary.

  • I can present my information and provide a concluding statement or section that relates to the information presented.


W.4.6

  • I can identify technology (e.g., Word, Publisher, PowerPoint) that will help me produce, edit, and publish my writing.

  • I can choose credible websites on the Internet that will help me compose, edit, and publish my writing.

  • I can collaborate with my peers, teachers, and others to produce and publish my writing.

  • I can use proper keyboarding skills (type a minimum of one page in a single sitting) to compose and prepare my writing for publication.


W.4.8

  • I can recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources about a topic.

  • I can take notes (write down short pieces of important information) about a topic.

  • I can sort the information from my notes into provided categories.

  • I can prepare a list of sources used during my research.

What do good writers do?


What’s my purpose and how do

I develop it?

Writing clearly: What makes a

difference?


Final product: What does it

take?


What do good researchers do?
“Cut and Paste:” What’s the

problem?



Additional Literacy

RF.4.4: Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

(c) Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and under- standing; rereading as necessary.


SL.4.5: Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.

L.4.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

(b) Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking) verb tenses.

Grade t3


L.4.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when

writing.

Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.




Language/Vocabulary
L.4.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown

and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

(b) Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information related to the topic. (c) Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because).

(d) Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. (e) Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
L.4.5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relation- ships, and nuances in word meanings. (a) Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors (e.g., as pretty as a picture) in context.

(b) Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs. (c) Demonstrate understanding of words by relating them to their opposites (antonyms) and to words with similar but not identical meanings (synonyms).



L.4.6: Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being (e.g., quizzed, whined, stammered) and that are basic to a particular topic (e.g., wildlife, conservation, and endangered when discussing animal preservation).


RF.4.4

  • I can read grade-level text fluently show comprehension through voice, timing, and expression.

  • I can recognize when a word I have read does not make sense within the text.

  • I can self-correct misread or misunderstood words when using context clues.

  • I can reread with corrections when necessary.

  • I can read fluently (easy, smooth, and automatic).


SL.4.5

  • I can identify main ideas or themes in my presentations that could be enhanced

I can determine and include an appropriate audio recording or visual display or visual display to enhance my main ideas or themes.
L.4.1

  • I can identify relative pronouns and use them correctly (e.g., who and whom refer to people; which refers to things, qualities, and ideas; that and those refer to people, things, qualities, and ideas).

  • I can identify relative adverbs and use them correctly (e.g., where modifies nouns of place, when modifies nouns of time, why modifies the noun reason).


L.4.2

  • I can determine when to capitalize words (e.g., proper nouns, “I”, first word in a sentence).

  • I can punctuate dialogue correctly by using commas before/after speaker tags and placing quotation marks around direct speech (e.g., “I was walking, “ Elle said, “when Mia tripped me.”)

  • I can use quotation marks to indicate words I have taken directly from a text.

  • I can identify a compound sentence and use a comma before the coordinating conjunction that connects the two sentences.

  • I can identify misspelled words and use resources to assist me in spelling correctly.


L.4.4

  • I can determine the meaning of unknown words using context clues (e. g., definitions, examples, restatements).

  • I can recognize and define common Greek and Latin affixes and roots (units of meaning).

  • I can break down unknown words into units of meaning to determine definitions.

  • I can verify my determined meaning of an unknown word by consulting reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses).


L.4.5

  • I can define and identify similes and metaphors within a text.

  • I can distinguish between literal language (it means exactly what it says) and figurative language (sometimes what you say is not exactly what you mean).

  • I can recognize when an author is using idioms, adages, and proverbs and determine his/her intended meaning.

  • I can explain the difference between synonyms (words with similar meanings) and antonyms (words with opposite meanings).

  • I can use my knowledge of synonyms and antonyms to demonstrate my understanding of words.


L.4.6

  • I can recognize the difference between general academic words and phrases (Tier Two words are subtle or precise ways to say relatively precise thing, e.g., saunter instead of walk.) and domain-specific words and phrases (Tier Three words are often specific to content knowledge, e. g., lava, democracy, pulley.).

  • I can acquire and use grade-appropriate academic and domain-specific words/phrases, including words that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being and that are basic to a particular topic.

What do good readers do?

Why does fluency matter?

What makes a presentation great?


“What I say” versus “ how I say it”, does it really matter?

Why do the rules of language matter?


Communicating clearly: What does it take?

Why do the rules of language matter?


Communicating clearly: What does it take?

When a word doesn’t make sense, what can I do?


How do I use what I know to figure out what I don’t know?

When a word doesn’t make sense, what can I do?


How do I use what I know to figure out what I don’t know?

When a word doesn’t make sense, what can I do?


How do I use what I know to figure out what I don’t know?



Performance Tasks and Scoring Guides/Rubric


Performance Task #2 including Scoring Guide/Rubric

Choose an animal you would be interested in researching, and write your thoughts down in your writing journal. Research an animal of choice following the same categories as the graphic organizer (name of animal, habitat, diet, protection/body facts, enemies, life expectancy, interesting facts). You will display the information learned creatively in a multimedia presentation. Be prepared to share your presentation with your class. (W 2, W 6, W8, W.4.4, W.4.7, L.4.1a, L.4.1b, L.4.1c, L.4.1d, L.4.1g, L.4.2a, L.4.2b, L.4.2c)




Rubric for Animals are Characters, Too!

CRITERIA

EXCELLENT (4 PTS.)

PROFICIENT (3 PTS.)

ADEQUATE (2 PTS.)

LIMITED (1 PT.)

Research

Used 3 or more highly appropriate resources.

Used 2 highly appropriate resources.

Used 1 highly appropriate resources.

Did not text to support facts.

Multimedia


Multimedia presentation will consist of 7 slides, one displaying each of the categories above.

Multimedia presentation will consist of 5 slides, one displaying each of the categories above.

Multimedia presentation will consist of 3 slides, one displaying each of the categories above.

Multimedia presentation will consist of 1 slides, one displaying each of the categories above.

Content

Individual slides will display a clear title and at least 4 facts with a picture to support research

Individual slides will display a clear title and at least 3 facts with a picture to support research

Individual slides will display a clear title and at least 2 facts with a picture to support research

Individual slides will display a clear title and at least 1 facts with a picture to support research

Conventions

No errors in punctuation, capitalization, or grade appropriate spelling words.

No more than 3 errors in punctuation, capitalization, or grade appropriate spelling words.

No more than 5 errors in punctuation, capitalization, or grade appropriate spelling words.

More than 6 errors in punctuation, capitalization, or grade appropriate spelling words.

Classroom presentation

Able to present investigation to class and is able to answer and elaborate on at least two questions.

Able to present investigation to class and is able to answer two questions from teacher or peers about investigation.

Presents investigation to class, but is able to only answer one question from teacher or peers about investigation.

Presents investigation to class, but is not able to answer any questions from teacher or peers about investigation.




Suggested Learning Experiences
Reading Units of Study- The Comprehension Toolkit- Whole Group Mini-Lessons


Cluster 5: Determining Importance

Unit Texts

District Suggest Texts

16. Spotlight New Thinking
Learn to use a F/Q/R Chart


National Geographic Articles

United Streaming on animal adaptations

*Any nonficton text with animal facts
Animal Adaptations (ebook)


At Home in the Arctic
Sourcebook

PowWow

Penguins in Motion

Toolkit Texts 2/3



The Great Chicago Fire

Toolkit Texts 4/5



17. Record Important Ideas
Create an FQR with historical fiction


Any historical fiction text read aloud

Aunt Harriet’s Underground
Railroad in the Sky

by Faith Ringgold and/or
Nettie's Trip South by Ann Turner

18. Target Key Information

Code the text to hold thinking




History Of Us ; From Colonies to Countries (Chapter 14, “One If By Land, Two If By Sea”) by Joy Hakim

On the Wings of a Dream

Sourcebook

See other short texts for grade 4 at end of this list.


19. Determine What to Remember
Separate interesting details from important ideas


National Geographic Articles
History Of Us ; From Colonies to Countries (Chapter 14, “One If By Land, Two If By Sea”) by Joy Hakim

Firefighting Through the Ages

For Men Only? Not!

Toolkit Texts 4/5



20. Distinguish Your Thinking from the Author's
Contrast what you think with the author's perspective

Source Book pages 55-57

Can kids stop kids from smoking?
Turn it off

Sourcebook

You Have a Choice!

Toolkit Texts 4/5



21. Construct Main Ideas From Supporting Details
Create a Topic/Detail/Response Chart


Any nonfiction article

Big Talkers
Sourcebook

Animal Ears

Toolkit Texts 2/3



Swim School

Toolkit Texts 4/5





Additional Reading Mini-Lessons/Shared Reading Activities




Poetry/Literature Response

Read selections from The Book of Nonsense by Edward Lear aloud with a partner. Not only should you discuss what the poems mean, but also talk about how the poetic devices, structures, and vocabulary used are similar and different. As a class, we will define a “limerick” and its elements, and then talk about how Lear’s poems exemplify these characteristics. We will create a T-chart with the name of the poetic technique and examples. At a later time, you will read selections from Scranimals by Jack Prelutsky aloud with the same partner. Partners will again find examples of poetic techniques and mark them with a Post-It note. Last, but not least, you will work with a partner to write your own animal limerick of a single animal (i.e., a lion) or an imaginary animal (i.e., such as the broccoli + lion = broccolion) (RL.4.4, RL.4.5, W.4.4, L.4.5a, L.4.5c)



Literary Graphic Organizer

As a class, we will keep a chart with the categories listed below of the animal stories and poems we’ve read. As the chart is filled in, we will use the information to talk about what we learned from literature.



      • Title and author

      • Type of narration (first-person, third-person)

      • Animal character(s)

      • Character traits

      • Examples of personification (i.e., thoughts, words, and actions)

      • Synonyms for the character

      • Antonyms for the character

      • Summary (using the Somebody-Wanted-But-So” strategy)

Write your response on a Post-It note, on a white board, or in your journal and share it with a partner before each section of the class chart is filled in. (RF.4.4c, RL.4.1, RL.4.2, RL.4.3, RL.4.4, RL.4.5, RL.4.6, L.4.5c)
Informational Text Graphic Organizer

As a class, we will keep a chart of information using the categories below we’ve learned about animals such as horses, dogs, mice, or other animals of interest. As the chart is filled in, we will use the information to talk about what we learned from nonfiction books.



      • Name of animal

      • Habitat

      • Diet

      • Protection/body facts

      • Enemies

      • Life expectancy

      • Interesting facts

Write your response on a Post-It note, on a white board, or in your journal and share it with a partner before each section of the class chart is filled in. (RF.4.4c, RI.4.1, RI.4.2, RI.4.4, RI.4.5, RI.4.7, RI.4.9)

Class Discussion/Reflective Essay

As a class, summarize what was learned in this unit as it relates to the essential question (“How is the portrayal of animals similar and different between fiction and nonfiction?”) Following the class discussion, write a response in your journal. Work with a partner to edit and strengthen your writing before sharing with your teacher. (W.4.9a, W.4.9b, W.4.4, W.4.5, L.4.1a, L.4.1b, L.4.1c, L.4.1d, L.4.1g, L.4.2a, L.4.2b, L.4.2c)



Class Discussion

Let’s compare and contrast how animals are personified. How is this personification portrayed in literature? If animals could talk and act like humans, which of the actions are most similar to generalizations about the animal (i.e., the “sly” fox, the “lazy” pig, etc.). Look back for specific lines or paragraphs in order to find explicit details from the stories and poems read. (SL.4.1, RL.4.3)



Class Discussion/Create a Class Book

As a class, read and discuss It's Raining Cats And Dogs: Making Sense of Animal Phrases by Jackie Franza and Steve Gray. Illustrate the literal and figurative meaning of an animal idiom. Compile these illustrations into a class book to share with younger students, and try to incorporate phrases learned into your daily writing and speaking. An alternate class book idea is to make an ABC book of animal characters in a style similar to W is for Woof by Ruth Strother and Gijsbert Van Frankenhuyzen. (RL.4.1, SL.4.1, L.4.5b)



Class Discussion

Compare the film and print versions of a book, such as Black Beauty or Black Stallion. You can also download and compare any animal film, such as Babe, to a film script version of the films, found here. (Your teacher needs to check and approve the parts of the script you want to use.) Decide what you want to compare before viewing (e.g., characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, and/or stage directions), and keep notes in your journal about similarities and differences as well as the major differences between drama and prose. (SL.4.1, RL.4.5)



Dramatization

After discussing the structural elements (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) that are unique to drama versus prose, add one or more of these elements to a Reader’s Theater script of a fun animal story, such as Tacky the Penguin (pdf) by Helen Lester and Lynn Munsinger. With at least two other classmates, add at least two scenes—one before the script begins and one after the script ends—to make it a one-act/three-scene play, and present it as a class. (RL.4.5, W.4.4)



Dramatization/Fluency

Choose one of the poems from this unit, such as “A Bird Came Down the Walk” by Emily Dickinson or “The Rhinoceros” by Ogden Nash, to read and discuss with a partner. Recite the poem for your classmates. (RF.4.4c, SL.4.5)





      • On Stage: Theater Games and Activities for Kids (Lisa Bany-Winters) (RL.4.5)
        Note: This compilation of varied and interesting theater games will stimulate the imagination and get young thespians ready to perform on stage. The games are divided into different categories, including improvisation, creating characters, using and becoming objects, and ideas for pantomime and puppetry. There are also suggestions for monologues, scenes, and plays.

      • Webcams in the Classroom: Animal Inquiry and Observation (ReadWriteThink) (SL.4.1)
        Note: Observe animal habits and habitats using one of the many webcams broadcasting from zoos and aquariums around the United States and the world in this inquiry-based activity that focuses on observation logs, class discussion, questioning, and research.

      • Black Beauty author Anna Sewell was born in 1820 (ReadWriteThink) (W.4.7)
        Note: In Black Beauty, Anna Sewell tackled one of the contemporary issues of her time, the cruel treatment of horses, many of them abused by their owners. Her work made readers aware of the need for laws to protect animals from harsh and abusive treatment.

      • Animal Inquiry (ReadWriteThink) (W.4.7)
        Note: The Animal Inquiry interactive is a versatile tool that can enhance student inquiry in research at the elementary level. The graphic organizer invites students to explore four facets of animals (basic facts, animal babies, interaction with others, and habitats) the possibilities for extensions or adaptations. Moreover, this makes a nice complement to inquiry-based projects.

      • Celebrate Kate DiCamillo's birthday today (ReadWriteThink) (RL.4.3)
        Note: DiCamillo often writes about animals, such as the title characters in Mercy Watson to the Rescue, Because of Winn-Dixie,The Tale of Despereaux, and The Tiger Rising. Have your students examine the characters in these stories, looking for character traits, examples of personification, and similarities and differences.

      • Alaska Native Stories: Using Narrative to Introduce Expository Text (ReadWriteThink) (RI.4.9)
        Note: This lesson uses traditional stories of the Native peoples (i.e., narrative text) to introduce students to the study of animals in Alaska (i.e., expository text).

      • Multimedia Responses to Content Area Topics Using Fact-“Faction”-Fiction (ReadWriteThink) (RL.4.9)
        Note: Young learners are very inquisitive and eager to learn about the world around them. One enjoyable way to do so is by reading books that blend fact and fiction, often with humorous results. This lesson encourages students' natural curiosity about spiders and builds on their prior knowledge.

      • How the Fourth Grade and I Wrote a Play (Matt Buchanan)(W.4.6)
        Note: What follows is a description of the process by which drama students, classroom teachers, and drama teacher created a play that was both informative and entertaining for its audience and enriching and personal for its creators.

      • Author of the Month: Jack Prelutsky (McGraw-Hill, Child Lit)

      • Writing with Writers: Poetry Writing with Jack Prelutsky (Scholastic)

      • Limericks (Old-Fashioned-American-Humor.Com)

      • Creative Drama Lesson Plans (Creative Drama Classroom)

      • Reader’s Theater K-3 Scripts (Grandview Library, East Ramapo School District, NJ)

Writer’s Workshop


Explorations in Nonfiction Writing

  • Writing to Inform p. 1-26

  • Power Write:

    • Diagram with Key p. 42

    • Partner Description: Electronic Slide Show p. 32

    • Investigation Informational p. 46

KCAS Informative/Explanatory Writing



Additional Writing Activities

Literature Response

Write a journal entry from an animal's perspective, being sure to give the animal human characteristics. Trade your journal entry with a partner to see if they can figure out your animal from your effort to “personify” it while still maintaining its unique animal characteristics. (W.4.9a, W.4.9b, W.4.4, RL.4.3)



Journal Response

Following a class discussion of animals studied, write a journal response (or make a graphic representation such as a Venn diagram) that compares facts learned with how the animal is portrayed in literature. (W.4.2a, W.4.2b, W.4.2c, W.4.4, W.4.7, L.4.1a, L.4.1b, L.4.1c, L.4.1d, L.4.1g, L.4.2a, L.4.2b, L.4.2c)


Narrative Writing

As your class discusses animal stories and poems, begin outlining your own narrative about an original animal character by starting with filling in the categories listed in the graphic organizer above. Before you begin writing, re-examine the characters in stories and poems we’ve read in this unit, recalling character traits, examples of personification, and lists of synonyms and/or figurative language you want to use. Make sure to plan a sequence of events that makes sense and think about key details to include. You will have the opportunity to work with a partner to revise, edit, and improve your story so that it can be published on a class webpage for others to see. Once the story is written, you will be asked to add audio recordings and visual displays to enhance it. (W.4.1, W.4.4, W.4.5, W.4.6, W.4.8, SL.4.5, L.4.5a, L.4.5b, L.4.5c, L.4.1a, L.4.1b, L.4.1c, L.4.1d, L.4.1g, L.4.2a, L.4.2b, L.4.2c)




Word Study/Vocabulary Lessons

Vocabulary notebook.

Word Study

As an individual and as a class, keep an index card file of new words learned in this unit. You may also have a nonsense word section where you make up words for animals (based on Scranimals) using new prefixes and suffixes learned until this point in the year. Each index card should include the word, a definition, the word in a sentence, and, for the nonsense words, an illustration. Keeping the words on index cards will allow you to use and sort the words by meaning and spelling features. (Note: This will be an ongoing activity all year long.) (L4.4a, L4.4b)






Unit Materials/Resources

Vocabulary

General

      • James Herriot's Treasury for Children: Warm and Joyful Tales by the Author of All Creatures Great and Small (James Herriot)

      • It's Raining Cats And Dogs: Making Sense of Animal Phrase  (Jackie Franza and Steve Gray)

      • Every Living Thing (Cynthia Rylant and S.D. Schindler)

      • Nacho And Lolita (Pam Munoz Ryan and Claudia Rueda)

      • The Mayor of Central Park (Avi and Brian Floca)

      • Tacky the Penguin (Helen Lester and Lynn Munsinger) (easier)

      • Days of the Blackbird (Tomie de Paola)

Horses

      • The Black Stallion (Walter Farley) (E)

      • Black Beauty: The Greatest Horse Story Ever Told (DK Readers Level 4) (Anna Sewell and Victor Ambrus)

      • Paint The Wind (Pam Munoz Ryan)

      • San Domingo: The Medicine Hat Stallion (Marguerite Henry and Robert Lougbeed)

      • Gift Horse: A Lakota Story (S.D. Nelson)

      • The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses (Paul Goble)

      • Misty of Chincoteague (Marguerite Henry and Wesley Dennis) (advanced)

Dogs

      • Akiak: A Tale of the Iditarod (Robert J. Blake)

      • Because of Winn-Dixie (Kate DiCamillo)

      • Shelter Dogs: Amazing Stories of Adopted Strays (Peg Kehret and Greg Farrar)

      • Lewis and Clark and Me: A Dog's Tale (Laurie Myers and Michael Dooling)

      • The Trouble with Tuck: The Inspiring Story of a Dog Who Triumphs Against All Odds (Theodore Taylor)

      • Three Names (Patricia Maclachlan and Alexander Pertzoff)

      • A Dog's Life: Autobiography of a Stray (Ann M. Martin)

      • Marley: A Dog Like No Other, A Special Adaptation for Young Readers (John Grogan)

      • Lassie Come-Home: Eric Knight's Original 1938 Classic (Rosemary Wells and Susan Jeffers)

      • Shiloh (Phyllis Reynolds Naylor and Barry Moser) (advanced)

Mice

      • Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread (Kate DiCamillo and Timothy Basil Ering)

      • Ben and Me: An Astonishing Life of Benjamin Franklin by His Good Mouse Amos (Robert Lawson)

      • Ralph S. Mouse (Beverly Cleary and Tracy Dockray)

      • The Mouse and the Motorcycle (Beverly Cleary)

      • The Bookstore Mouse (Peggy Christian and Gary A. Lippincott)

      • Ragweed (The Poppy Stories)(Avi and Brian Floca)

      • The Race Across America (Geronimo Stilton)

      • The Story of Jumping Mouse: A Native American Legend (John Steptoe)

      • Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH (Robert C. O’Brien) (advanced)

      • Poppy (The Poppy Stories) (Avi and Brian Floca) (advanced)

Poems

      • “A Bird Came Down the Walk” (Emily Dickinson) (E)

      • “The Rhinoceros“ (Ogden Nash)

      • “The Erratic Rat“ (Traditional limerick)

      • The Complete Nonsense of Edward Lear (Edward Lear)

      • Scranimals (Jack Prelutsky)

      • The Beauty of the Beast: Poems from the Animal Kingdom (Jack Prelutsky)

      • Poetry for Young People: Animal Poems (John Hollander and Simona Mulazzani)

Informational Texts

Informational Text

General

      • “Seeing Eye to Eye” (National Geographic Explorier!) (Leslie Hall) (E)

      • “Good Pet, Bad Pet” (Ranger Rick, June 2002) (Elizabeth Schleichert) (E)

      • National Geographic Encyclopedia of Animals (George McKay)

Veterinarians

      • I Want to Be a Veterinarian (Stephanie Maze)

      • Veterinarian (Cool Careers) (William Thomas)

Horses

      • Horses (Seymour Simon) (E)

      • H is for Horse: An Equestrian Alphabet (Michael Ulmer and Gijsbert van Frankenhuyzen)

      • Your Pet Pony (Scholastic, A True Book) (Elaine Landau)

      • Horse Heroes: True Stories Of Amazing Horses (DK Readers Proficient Readers, Level 4) (Kate Petty)

      • Panda: A Guide Horse For Ann (Rosanna Hansen and Neil Soderstrom)

      • The Kids' Horse Book (Sylvia Funston)

      • Paint the Wind (Pam Munoz Ryan)

Dogs

      • Dogs (Smithsonian) (Seymour Simon) (EA)

      • W is for Woof: A Dog Alphabet (Ruth Strother and Gijsbert van Frankenhuyzen)

      • Everything Dog: What Kids Really Want to Know About Dogs (Kids' FAQs) (Marty Crisp)

      • A Dog's Gotta Do What a Dog's Gotta Do: Dogs at Work (Marilyn Singer)

      • Your Pet Dog (Scholastic, A True Book) (Elaine Landau)

      • Why Are Dogs' Noses Wet?: And Other True Facts (Howie Dewin)

Mice

Art, Music, and Media

Media

      • Black Stallion (1979)

      • Black Beauty (1994)

      • Black Beauty (1946)

      • Because of Winn Dixie (2005)

      • Tale of Despereaux (2008)

      • Babe (1995)

      • Ratatouille (2007)




Reading:

  • Inference

  • Explicit

  • Poetic devices: drama, prose, structural element

  • Main idea

  • Key detail

  • Summary

  • Format


Writing:

  • Formatting structure

  • Multimedia

  • Precise

  • Domain-specific (vocabulary)

  • Publish

  • Credible (website)

  • Print source

  • Digital sources

  • Notes

  • Category

  • Research

Additional Literacy

  • Fluency

  • Context clue




Teacher Notes







The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page