Undergrad electives



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Department of English

School of Humanities

Ateneo de Manila University

UNDERGRAD ELECTIVES

First Semester 2013-2014





LIT 112.1 CLASSICAL TO MODERN LITERARY CRITICISM

MWF, 3:30-4:30pm (For Lit Majors Only)

Ms. Charlene Diaz

This class is an introduction to literary criticism from five Western periods: the Classical Age, the Middle Ages and the Rennaissance, the Age of Enlightenment, the Romantic Period, and the Modern Age.


Lit 126.1 WESTERN LITERATURE I: THE ANCIENT WORLD TO THE RENAISSANCE

Section A – WED, 4:30-7:30pm (Lit Majors Only)

Dr. Vincenz Serrano

Section B – MWF, 2:30-3:30pm

Dr. Edward Ruiz

Section C – MWF, 3:30-4:30pm

Ms. Mayel Martin

A survey of the literature of the Western World produced between the 10th century BC and the late 17th century, including representative poetry, drama, prose fiction, and non-fiction from the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.


LIT 127.1 THIRD WORLD LITERATURE I

Section A – MWF, 3:30-4:30pm (Lit Majors Only)

Mr. Maximino Pulan, Jr.

Section B – TTH, 7:30-9:00am

Mr. Miguel Lizada

Section C – THU, 4:30-7:30pm

Ms. Annette Soriano

A survey of African, Asian, and Latin American literature from antiquity to the 1700’s, focusing on works selected primarily for their ability to illustrate the strong influence of colonialism.


LIT 136 CREATIVE WRITING II: FICTION

TUE, 4:30-7:30pm

Dr. Edgar Samar

A creative writing workshop under the direction of a writer with guided writing, discussion, and analysis of the students’ original short stories, novellas, and novels.


LIT 138 CREATIVE WRITING III: NON-FICTION

TUE, 4:30-7:30pm

Dr. Laurel Fantauzzo

LIT 138 is a creative writing workshop conducted under the direction of a guest writer. The course guides the writing of, discusses, and analyzes the students’ original works of non-fiction such as personal essays, journals, and travelogues.


LIT 143 CLASSICAL DRAMA

MWF, 9:30-10:30am

Dr. Edward Ruiz

LIT 143 is a survey of representative works of drama from the Classical Age. The course focuses on the works of major Greek and Roman dramatists such as Aeschylus, Euripides, and Sophocles.


LIT 146 SHAKESPEARE: COMEDIES

MWF, 1:30-2:30pm

Mr. Exie Abola

An introduction to Shakespearean comedy and historical dramatic works, with emphasis on the texts as poetical drama; historical and biographical materials will be used where relevant.


LIT 189 EUROPEAN LITERATURE

MWF, 11:30-12:30pm

MS. MARY THOMAS

An introduction to the major European writers from the Ancient World to postmodernist times.


LIT 191.7 THE DEVELOPMENT OF FICTION

SAT, 8:00-11:00am

Mr. Danilo Francisco Reyes

A reading course on representative fictionists and their selected novels and short stories. It presents a historic-literary survey of major issues in fiction studies and the fundamental debates, arguments, problems, and achievements in this genre.



LIT 193 CULTURAL STUDIES

WED, 5:30-8:30pm

Dr. Oscar Campomanes

This class acquaints and arms students with foundational knowledge in the body of Cultural Studies theory, focusing on the seminal work of Raymond Williams and Stuart Hall in the context of their antidisciplinary work in literary, cultural, media and communication critique and subsequent institutional transformations and institutionalizations ushered by their prolific and rigorously argued efforts and theoretical insights. We first review the classical-marxisant underpinnings of Cultural Studies especially around the culture concept; next, we dwell at length on the problem of culture’s relationship of determination and ‘separation’ with ‘society’ in Neo-Marxism and New Left politics and its notional transformations across the disciplines (esp. in cultural anthropology, historical sociology, and literary critique); and then assess the categorical centrality that it acquires in the context of late-modern media and communication studies. We conclude, as well as parallel, this consideration in the provenance and global spread of Cultural Studies theory and practice, with a brief but focused look on emergent Philippine Cultural Studies work including some of its untheorized antecedents and expressions. Projects undertaken in this class shall attempt to manifest and operationalize evolved knowledge in Cultural Studies theory through student exposure to (or immersion in) contemporary cultural production and practice in literary, media and other discursive realms/formations.
LIT 193.23 WRITING SEMINAR:  DRAMA

WED, 1:30-4:30pm

Mr. Glenn Mas

Lecture and discussion on the reading and writing of plays for radio, stage, screen or television as well as on a variety of subject matters from the point of view of practitioners of that genre.
LIT 193.31 LITERATURE AND IDEAS III: PIERRE BOURDIEU AND LITERARY STUDIES

TTH, 12:00-1:30pm

Ms. Alona Guevarra

The class provides an introduction to the renowned French sociologist, Pierre Bourdieu’s contribution to literary studies through a thorough discussion of his main concepts of habitus, capital, field and symbolic power. The relevance of Bourdieu’s method in the understanding of the current transnational turn in literary studies will be established.



LIT 193.35 LITERATURE AND IDEAS III: LITERATURE AND BLACK STUDIES

MWF, 12:30-1:30pm

Dr. Jocelyn Martin

This course introduces students familiar with post-colonial theory to Literature, culture and Black Studies. Proposed is a panorama of ideas ranging from the Negritude movement (Aimé Césaire, Léopold Senghor); African-American double-consciousness and slavery (W.E.B. Du Bois, Frederick Douglass); Caribbean diasporic black identity (Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy); women and blackness; epidermal stereotype, psychiatry and Bleaching Syndrome (Frantz Fanon, Ronald Hall); representation of blackness in media and museums (Birmingham school) and, finally, the black tradition in music from negro spirituals to Michael Jackson. All such issues will be discussed alongside Philippine literature and Filipino views on epidermal colour.






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