Ucd school of Economics Policy on Plagiarism Information for Students What is plagiarism?



Download 45,58 Kb.
Date conversion02.02.2019
Size45,58 Kb.


UCD School of Economics

Policy on Plagiarism

Information for Students

  1. What is plagiarism?

Plagiarism is academic theft and is taken very seriously. It is a breach of UCD college discipline as outlined in Section 6.2 of the Student Code and the penalties for it are severe.

The University understands plagiarism to be the inclusion of another person’s writings or ideas or works, in any formally presented work (including essays, theses, projects, laboratory reports, examinations, oral, poster or slide presentations) which form part of the assessment requirements for a module or programme of study, without due acknowledgement either wholly or in part of the original source of the material through appropriate citation. Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty, where ideas are presented falsely, either implicitly or explicitly, as being the original thought of the author’s.



The presentation of work, which contains the ideas, or work of others without appropriate attribution and citation, (other than information that can be generally accepted to be common knowledge) is an act of plagiarism. It can include the following:

    1. Presenting work authored by a third party, including other students, friends, family, or work purchased through internet services;

    2. Presenting work copied extensively with only minor textual changes from the internet, books, journals or any other source;

    3. Improper paraphrasing, where a passage or idea is summarised without due acknowledgement of the original source;

    4. Failing to include citation of all original sources;

    5. Representing collaborative work as one’s own;

(UCD Plagiarism Policy: http://www.ucd.ie/registry/academicsecretariat/docs/plagiarism_po.pdf)

Remember that whenever you submit an assessment (essay, thesis or problem set) to the School of Economics, you are required to sign a coversheet which declares the work to be your own (coversheets are available from the School’s office).



  1. How to avoid plagiarism?

Very simply: if you take an idea from someone or somewhere else, you must acknowledge it by giving an accurate and full account of your source(s); otherwise you have plagiarized your source(s).


Specific Examples of Plagiarism
The following section is taken from the article “Teaching Inflation Targeting: An Analysis for Intermediate Macro” by Carl E. Walsh, published in Journal of Economic Education, Fall 2002, p. 333-346.
Over the last decade, many central banks have adopted monetary policies known as inflation targeting. New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Canada, Mexico, and Israel are among the countries employing inflation targeting in the conduct of monetary policy, and the European Central Bank has been urged to follow suit (Svensson and Woodford, 1999). If intermediate-level macroeconomics classes are to prepare students to think about current policy issues, it is important to provide them with some introduction to the implications inflation targeting has for macroeconomic behavior. Unfortunately, the standard aggregate demand–aggregate supply frameworks commonly used to teach intermediate macroeconomics are not well suited for analyzing inflation targeting for two reasons. First, these frameworks are expressed in terms of output and the price level, and, second, the policy objectives of the central bank are not made explicit.
In your assignment you will be plagiarizing if you write:
Example 1: I argue that, first these frameworks are expressed in terms of output and the price level, and, second, the policy objectives of the central bank are not made explicit.
THIS IS PLAGIARIZED: YOU HAVE QUOTED FROM CARL E. WALSH, BUT HAVE NOT ACKNOWLEDGED IT.

Example 2: Over the last decade, many countries, such as New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and Sweden, have adopted monetary policies known as inflation targeting. Clearly the standard aggregate demand–aggregate supply frameworks commonly used to teach intermediate macroeconomics are not suitable for analyzing inflation targeting, since these frameworks are in terms of output and the price level. Furthermore, the policy objectives of the central bank are not made explicit.
THIS IS PLAGIARIZED: EVEN THOUGH YOU HAVE DELETED SOME OF THE QUOTATION AND ADDED SOME OF YOUR OWN WORDS. YOU HAVE NOT ACKNOWLEDGED YOUR USE OF WALSH’ WORK.

Example 3: Walsh (2002) argues that “the standard aggregate demand–aggregate supply frameworks commonly used to teach intermediate macroeconomics are not well suited for analyzing inflation targeting.” The reasons put forward are that these frameworks are expressed in terms of output and the price level, and that the policy objectives of the central bank are not made explicit.
THIS IS PLAGIARIZED: SOME OF THE QUOTATION IS CITED. HOWEVER, IN THE SECOND SENTENCE, IDEAS ARE CLEARLY DRAWN FROM WALSH’ ARTICLE, WITHOUT LISTING THE SOURCE.

Specific Examples of Correct Citations
Example 4: Walsh (2002) argues that: “the standard aggregate demand–aggregate supply frameworks commonly used to teach intermediate macroeconomics are not well suited for analyzing inflation targeting,” the main reasons being that these frameworks analyze macroeconomic issues in terms of output and price level, and do not model explicitly the objectives of the monetary authorities.
THIS IS NOT PLAGIARIZED BECAUSE YOU HAVE GIVEN CLEAR EVIDENCE OF YOUR USE OF WALSH ARTICLE. YOUR WORK IS COMPLETED IN THIS CASE WHEN YOU ADD THE PUBLICATION DETAILS IN YOUR “BIBLIOGRAPHY” OR “REFERENCES” SECTION. THE EXAMPLE HERE REQUIRES:
Walsh, C. E. (2002) ‘Teaching Inflation Targeting: An Analysis for Intermediate Macro’, Journal of Economic Education, Fall, pp. 333-346.
Example 5: Carl E. Walsh (2002) argues that the aggregate demand-aggregate supply frameworks are no longer adequate tools to analyze macroecomomic policy issues, given the widespread use of inflation targeting by monetary authorities around the world. These frameworks, in fact, focus on output and price level, and do not incorporate the objectives of the monetary authorities.
THIS IS NOT PLAGIARIZED BECAUSE YOU HAVE GIVEN CLEAR EVIDENCE OF YOUR USE OF WALSH ARTICLE. YOUR WORK IS COMPLETED IN THIS CASE WHEN YOU ADD THE PUBLICATION DETAILS IN “BIBLIOGRAPHY” OR “REFERENCES” SECTION. THE EXAMPLE HERE REQUIRES:
Walsh, C. E. (2002) ‘Teaching Inflation Targeting: An Analysis for Intermediate Macro’, Journal of Economic Education, Fall, pp. 333-346.
For more information on how to avoid plagiarism and how to correctly cite when writing economic essays, see http://libguides.ucd.ie/economics/citing



  1. Consequences


3.1 Suspected cases of plagiarism in module assessment components

Where a module co-ordinator detects a suspected instance of plagiarism in a student’s assignment or examination, and the student has no previous record of plagiarism within the School, the following procedure will be followed:



  1. the module coordinator will request a meeting with the student to provide a warning and advice about correct citation and how to avoid plagiarism in the future;

  2. on that occasion the student will be required to resubmit the work, and an appropriate penalty will be applied;

  3. the outcome of the case will be recorded on the student’s record by the School.

If the student disagrees with the module coordinator’s judgement of his work, he may appeal to the Head of School and request that his/her case be reviewed by the School Committee that oversees cases of plagiarism within the School. The committee will request a meeting with the student and will confirm the judgement if plagiarism is present.
3.1 Suspected cases of plagiarism in PhD documents (i.e. PhD student paper for the transfer assessment panel or a PhD dissertation)
Where a relevant academic (such as a supervisor, doctoral studies panel member, or transfer assessment panel member) detects a suspected instance of plagiarism in a PhD student’s written document, and the student has no previous record of plagiarism within the School, the following procedure will be followed:

a. the academic will request a meeting with the student and the student’s supervisor to provide a warning and advice about correct citation and how to avoid plagiarism in the future;

b. on that occasion the student will be required to resubmit the work, and an appropriate penalty will be applied; in severe cases, the penalty may include expulsion from the PhD programme;

c. the outcome of the case will be recorded on the student’s record by the School.

If the student disagrees with the supervisor’s judgement of his work, s/he may appeal to the Head of School and request that his/her case be reviewed by the School Committee that oversees cases of plagiarism within the School. The committee will request a meeting with the student and will confirm the judgement if plagiarism is present.

 

Where the student has a previous record of plagiarism within the School, the module coordinator or PhD supervisor will directly refer the new case to the School Committee who will then make a judgement as to whether a recurrence can be handled at local level or whether it merits being handled as a disciplinary matter by the Registrar or their nominee. Cases referred to the Registrar or their nominee will be resolved under the University’s disciplinary procedures (see UCD Plagiarism Policy http://www.ucd.ie/registry/academicsecretariat/docs/plagiarism_po.pdf).



 
February 2016


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page