Twelfth Grade


SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT Endnotes



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SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT

Endnotes

Your endnotes analyze your research experience at the conclusion of the Capstone Project. How did you decide to use this genre? What difficulties did you have with finding/organizing information? What did you like best about it? Where is the source of information for the piece?


This is the second to last page of your project, typed on a separate sheet. NOTE: This is not your works consulted or works cited page. Each endnote should be at least 100+ words in length.
You will number your endnotes by genre number. This means that your first genre in your booklet will correspond to endnote #1 and so on.
Two examples of endnotes:



  1. This has to be my favorite genre. I documented many facts from Rogers and John Swick’s Boondock’s information. These facts were scattered in various web sources, so I had to finally compile a complete impression I had of Uncle Sam. While writing the poem, I had trouble rhyming phrases with “Wilson” though. In the end, it was worth the hours of rhyming to produce such an impressive piece. In order to make Uncle Sam seem like a playful person, I used the ABAB rhyme scheme.



  1. The first part of my research had contained an overwhelming amount of information about the Gilded Age. Cartoons arrived in that period with the father of political cartoons, Thomas Nast. In The Ungentlemanly Art, the beginning chapters focused on Nast’s accomplishments. I further used the Thomas Nast biography for specifics. I used a newspaper article for this genre because Nast often drew for Harper’s Weekly. I also used the alternative writing style of double voice between Nast and Tweed, as if the two were indirectly arguing. The genre went smoothly because of the amount of information I had.


HELPFUL HINTS


  • Choose a point of view from which to convey the information (concerned citizen, activist, college student, small business owner, taxpayer, etc.)

  • Use effective transitions between genres-put genres in a logical sequence

  • Make effective choices of genres

  • Make sure the genres make sense with your topic

  • Appearance matters- from the cover of your project to the fonts, colors pictures, etc. that you use affect your presentation in every way!

Twelfth Grade

English Language Arts

2014-15 Year at a Glance




8 weeks

5 weeks

7 weeks

5 weeks

5 weeks

6 weeks

Unit Theme

UNIT 1: The Power of Words

UNIT 2: Archetypes in Life & Literature

UNIT 3: The Quest for Utopia

UNIT 4: Equity & Disparity

UNIT 5: Change and Tradition

UNIT 6: Transition to Adulthood

Essential Question

What power do words have over individuals and societies?


Where do archetypes originate, what explains their longevity, and what societal values do they reflect?

What are the elements of an ideal society---and who decides?


How does literature depict and inform the reader’s perceptions of equity and disparity?

How does the dissonance between tradition and change shape individuals and societies?

What qualities, characteristics, and events contribute to shaping your identity?


Writing Focus

Narrative

(college application or letter of intent)

Informative/

Explanatory

(effectiveness of rhetoric and text structures)


Informative/

Explanatory

(literary analysis)


Informative/

Explanatory

(rhetorical analysis)

Argument


(foundational research skills)

Argument


(synthesis essay)


Argument

(Capstone research paper; begin Multi Genre Portfolio)


Narrative

(letter of advice for incoming Freshmen)
(completion and presentation of Capstone project)


Social Studies Connections

How does geography affect language?

How does language evolve over time?



What historical events shaped our definition of an archetype?

How do we negotiate the demands of development, the responsible allocation of resources, and environmental conservation?

How can individuals and societies protect human rights and dignity?

Who or what determines whether a tradition is changed or sustained?

How do we grow up by adapting to our environment?

Science Connections

How do we use language to clearly communicate and represent scientific ideas to different audiences?

What limitations or advancements does a society place on scientific research?

How has science improved society?


How does science influence the politics and economics of a society?


How has science affect superstition and shift perspectives and paradigms?


What is the role of environment versus DNA in shaping identity?


Key Terms

Rhetorical Device & Triangle, Claim, Logical Fallacy, Logos, Ethos, Pathos, Diction, Parody, Irony, Figurative Language, Tone, Satire, Structure, Allusion, Analogy, Speaker, Propaganda, Purpose

Archetype, Allegory, Conflict (internal v. external), Paradox, Tragedy, Hubris, Hamartia, Catharsis, Epiphany, Myth,

Characterization



Propaganda, Satire, Utopia, Dystopia, Humanism, Humanities, Existentialism


Equality, Cultural Identity, Disparity,

Ethnocentrism, Oppression, Pluralism, Ethics, Tolerance, Multiculturalism, Assimilation, Equity



Cognitive Dissonance, Paradigm Shift, Metacognition


Quest, Bildungsroman


Twelfth Grade Unit 1 Theme: The Power of Words
In this unit students will have an overview of the power of words through reading and writing. Students will learn terms and skills for argument, informative/explanatory, and narrative writing and produce short samples of all three areas of writing focus.


Essential Question

Supporting Questions

Key Terms

Writing Focus

Science Connections

Social Studies Connections

What power do words have over individuals and societies?


  • What are the purposes of communication?

  • How does the ability to communicate affect our social, economic, and academic opportunities?

  • What are the components of effective rhetoric and literary expression?

  • What is the role of social media in shaping perception?

  • How does social media affect communication styles and relationships?

  • What ethical considerations should guide our use of media and technology?

  • In what ways does academic language foster and convey clear, analytical, critical thinking in all subject areas?

  • How does language evolve over time?

Rhetorical Device, Rhetorical Triangle, Claim/Thesis, Logical Fallacy, Logos, Ethos, Pathos, Diction, Satire, Irony, Figurative Language, Tone, Structure, Allusion, Analogy, Speaker, Propaganda, Purpose, Parody

Informative/

Explanatory (effectiveness of rhetoric and text structures)



&

Narrative (college application or letter of intent)




How do we use language to clearly communicate and represent scientific ideas to different audiences?


How does geography affect language?
How does language evolve over time?
How does language shape identity?


(BOLD = priority standard building towards Senior Capstone Project)





ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

READING

RI.11-12.2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.


  • I can determine two or more central ideas of a text.

  • I can examine the central ideas of the text and how they interact together to provide meaning.

I can summarize the text.

RI.11-12.5. Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.

  • I can analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the author's structure.

  • I can analyze and evaluate use of structure in creating a clear, convincing, and engaging text.

RL.11-12.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  • I can examine how the author chooses to structure the text.

  • I can determine how the structure contributes to the meaning of the text.

  • I can evaluate the style of the text and how it adds to the meaning of the text.




RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text.

  • I can analyze how a text's style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of a text.

ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

WRITING

W.11-12.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.


  • I can write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately.

  • I can effectively select, organize, and analyze content in my informative/explanatory writing.

W.11-12.2 (a): Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

  • I can introduce a topic, and build complex ideas and concepts to create an organized and unified whole.

I can use formatting, graphics and multi-media to aid comprehension when useful.

W.11-12.2 (b): Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

  • I can identify my audience and use relevant concrete details (facts, extended definitions, quotations, or other information) to develop the topic thoroughly.



W.11-12.2 (c) Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

  • I can use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax (sentence fluency) to link major sections of the text.

I can create cohesion and clarify relationships, complex ideas, and concepts through the use of transitions.

W.11-12.2 (d): Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as
metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.


  • I can use precise word choice and relevant vocabulary to direct the reader through the topic.

  • I can use metaphor, simile, and analogy to direct the reader through the topic.



W.11-12.2 (e): Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

  • I can use correct and appropriate conventions in my writing.




W.11-12.2 (f): Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

  • I can provide a concluding statement that supports the information or explanation presented.

I can use my conclusion to articulate the implication or significance of the topic.

W.11-12.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  • I can write narratives that develop real or imagined experiences or events.

I can use effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences to write my narrative.

W.11-12.3 (a): Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

  • I can create a problem, situation, or observation that is engaging and communicate its importance to the reader.

  • I can establish one or more points of view and introduce a narrator and/or characters.

  • I can create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3 (b): Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

  • I can use narrative techniques (such as dialogue, packing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines) to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3 (c): Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

  • I can use a variety of techniques to sequence events that build on one another to create a meaningful whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome.

W.11-12.3 (d): Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

  • I can use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3 (e): Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • I can write a conclusion that reflects on what is experienced and resolved over the course of the narrative.



ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

  • I can evaluate how a speaker uses evidence, reasoning, point of view, and rhetoric.

  • I can evaluate the speaker's stance, premises, word choice, connects among ideas, points of emphasis, and tone used.

SL.11-12.4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks.


  • I can present the information and supporting evidence to convey a clear point of view.

  • I can present information so that listeners can follow my line of reasoning.

  • I can use appropriate organization, development, substance, and style to establish a purpose and audience.



SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

  • I can change my speech depending on my audience, situation and task.

I can demonstrate that I know how to use English properly.

ELA Core Standards

  • Student Learning Targets

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.


  • I can understand how language functions in different contexts.

  • I can make choices in language to understand reading or listening.




L.11-12.3 (a). Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g.,Tufte’s Artful Sentences) for guidance as needed; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts when reading.

  • I can use a variety of references to understand syntax (sentence fluency) when reading complex texts.









Unit 1 Text Resources

Literary

Informational

Short Story: CatbirdSeat by James Thurber

Short Story: ThereWillComeSoftRains by Ray Bradbury

Short Story: Sweat by Zora Neale Hurston (L-1080)*

Short Story: HarrisonBergeron by Kurt Vonnegut

Epic Poem: Book 24 TheIliad (L-1040)*

Poem: MiniverCheevey by Edwin Arlington Robinson

Literary nonfiction essay: AHistoryofTheWorld Richard Lederer

ArsPoetica by Archibald MacLeish

Poem: Riprapby Gary Snyder

Poem:IntroductiontoPoetrybyBillyCollins
CAUTION - * Indicates that the Lexile level of the text is below the recommended Lexile range for that grade level.


GettysburgAddress by Abraham Lincoln

SecondInaugural by Abraham Lincoln



I Have a Dream ABC News (coverage of MLK Memorial)

I Have a Dream by Martin Luther King, Jr. (full speech)

NotbyMathAlone by Sandra Day O’Connor

1997: PrincessDianadiesinPariscrash BBC News

QueenElizabeth'sDianaPrincessofWalestribute- QueenElizabeth'sSpeech Audio file, A Granada Production

EarlSpencer'sEulogyforDiana Audio file, American Rhetoric Online Speech Bank

DeathofDiana, PrincessofWales Wikipedia

DeathofThe "Death" ofaPrincessDiana Mave’s Blog, (BBC, Queen Elizabeth, Earl Spencer, Wikipedia)

Youtube: BobbyKennedy’sspeechwhenMLKdied

Propaganda posters: Change, GermanPropagandaArchive,



Twelfth Grade

Unit 1

Glossary of Key Terms




Key Term

Definition

Rhetorical Device

A technique that an author or speaker uses to motivate or persuade the audience; e.g., irony, understatement, hyperbole, syntax, allusion, analogy, diction, repetition, et al.

Rhetorical Triangle

a.k.a. Aristotelian Triangle (speaker, audience, topic, purpose, and context)

Speaker/Voice/Persona

The personality, attitude or character “speaking” in the text (not necessarily the author)

Audience

The intended readers or listeners of the text/speech

Purpose

The reason for creating the text or speech (i.e. to shock, to persuade, to entertain, to inform…)

Claim/Thesis

main argument, assertion; the central idea to be proven by supporting evidence and analysis

Logical Fallacy

An incorrect or false application of logic; common error in reasoning that undermines the logic of the argument

Logos

Logos (Logical)—Aristotle's favorite. The logic used to support a claim (induction and deduction); can also be the facts and statistics used to help support the argument.

Ethos

Ethos (Credibility), or ethical appeal, refers to the source's credibility, the speaker's/author's authority and trustworthiness.

Pathos

Pathos (Emotional)—the emotional or motivational appeals; vivid language, emotional language and numerous sensory details that appeal to the heart rather than the intellect.

Diction

Word choice and the impact of connotations and denotations of words.


Figurative Language

A form of language use in which writers and speakers convey something other than the literal meaning of their words. Examples include hyperbole or exaggeration, litotes or understatement, simile and metaphor, and personification.

Structure

The physical organization of a text (e.g. chapters, sections, stanzas) and the content/topical organization of the text (e.g. organizing a story around significant events in a character’s life, or organizing a poem around the seasons). In a literary text, structure can include exposition, conflict, climax, falling action/denouement, and resolution.

Irony

A contrast or discrepancy between what is said and what is meant or between what happens and what is expected to happen in life and in literature. In verbal irony, characters say the opposite of what they mean. In irony of circumstance or situation, the opposite of what is expected occurs. In dramatic irony, a character speaks in ignorance of a situation or event known to the audience or to the other characters.

Satire

A literarygenreorform, although in practice it can also be found in the graphic and performingarts. In satire, vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, and society itself, into improvement. Although satire is usually meant to be funny, its greater purpose is often constructive socialcriticism, using wit as a weapon.

Parody

A literary or artistic work that imitates the characteristic style of an author or a work for comic effect or ridicule. The genre of literature comprising such works. Something so bad as to be equivalent to intentional mockery; a travesty.

Tone

A literary element that is a part of a text, which encompasses the attitudes toward the subject and toward the audience implied in a literary work.

Allusion

A short, informal reference to a famous person, place or event especially from the Bible, Shakespeare, and Greek mythology.

Analogy

Compares two things, which are alike in several respects, for the purpose of explaining or clarifying some unfamiliar or difficult idea or object by showing how the idea or object is similar to some familiar one. E.g. To explain to a surfer what snow boarding is like by comparing the two sports.

Propaganda

Information which is false or which emphasizes just one part of a situation, used by a government or political group to make people agree with them.




Unit 1 Planning and Notes





Twelfth Grade Unit 2: Archetypes in Life & Literature
In this unit students will analyze literature with archetypal characters and draw conclusions about society’s values.

Informational/Explanatory writing will be emphasized.


Essential Question

Supporting Questions

Key Terms

Writing Focus

Science Connections

Social Studies Connections

Where do archetypes originate, what explains their longevity, and what societal values do they reflect?



  • How have our definitions of archetypal characters remained constant or shifted according to our evolving cultural values?  Why?

  • How are archetypes manifested in modern media, literature and current events?

  • How do archetypal characters, themes and settings embody specific values?  

  • How do these characters or themes inform us today in the context of current events, technologies, cultures, and values?

  • What are the characteristics and values of an archetypal character? (e.g. Odysseus v. real or literary heroes of today)

Archetype, Allegory, Conflict (internal v. external), Paradox,

Campbell’s heroic cycle, Tragedy, Hubris, Hamartia, Catharsis, Epiphany, Myth,

Characterization


Informative/

Explanatory (literary analysis)




How do societal values define the limitations and advancements of scientific research?

What historical events shaped our definition of an archetype?








ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

READING

RL.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

  • I can use text to determine the meaning of words and phrases.

  • I can determine an author's tone through analysis of word choice.

  • I can determine the figurative and connotative meaning of words and phrases.




RL.11-12.6: Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

  • I can analyze a text's point of view that specifically requires using satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement.

RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

  • I can analyze multiple versions of a story, drama, or poem.

  • I can evaluate how multiple versions of a story, drama, or poem interpret the source text.



RI.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.


  • I can cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

  • I can cite specific material from the text, draw inferences from the text, and determine where the text leaves matters uncertain.



RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.


  • I can determine two or more central ideas of a text.

  • I can examine the central ideas of the text and how they interact together to provide meaning.

  • I can summarize the text.




RI.11-12.3: Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

  • I can analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.




RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

  • I can evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats to solve a problem.

I can integrate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g. visually, quantitatively) to address a question or solve a problem.

ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

WRITING

W.11-12.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.


  • I can write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately.

I can effectively select, organize, and analyze content in my informative/explanatory writing.

W.11-12.2 (a): Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

  • I can introduce a topic, and build complex ideas and concepts to create an organized and unified whole.

  • I can use formatting, graphics and multi-media to aid comprehension when useful.

W.11-12.2 (b): Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

  • I can identify my audience and use relevant concrete details (facts, extended definitions, quotations, or other information) to develop the topic thoroughly.




W.11-12.2 (c) Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

  • I can use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax (sentence fluency) to link major sections of the text.

I can create cohesion and clarify relationships, complex ideas, and concepts through the use of transitions.

W.11-12.2 (d): Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as
metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.

  • I can use precise word choice and relevant vocabulary to direct the reader through the topic.

  • I can use metaphor, simile, and analogy to direct the reader through the topic.

W.11-12.2 (e): Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

  • I can use correct and appropriate conventions in my writing.




W.11-12.2 (f): Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

  • I can provide a concluding statement that supports the information or explanation presented.

I can use my conclusion to articulate the implication or significance of the topic.

W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

  • I can draw evidence form literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflections and research.

W.11-12.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes.

  • I can write over extended and shorter time frames for a range of purposes and tasks.

ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets



S & L





SL.11-12.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks.

  • I can present the information and supporting evidence to convey a clear point of view.

  • I can present information so that listeners can follow my line of reasoning.

I can use appropriate organization, development, substance, and style to establish a purpose and audience.

ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

LANGUAGE


L 11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

  • I can determine the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words.

L 11-12.4 (a): Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

  • I can use the strategy of context clues to determine the meaning of words.



L 11-12.4 (b): Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

I can use understanding of the parts of speech to indicate different meanings of words.

L 11-12.4 (c): Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

  • I can use print and digital references to determine the pronunciation, precise meaning, part of speech, etymology, and standard use of words.

L 11-12.4 (d): Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • I can check context or reference materials to verify the meaning of a word.



Unit 2 Text Resources


Literary

Informational

Epic poem: Beowulf, by anonymous (L 1090)*

Excerpts from Grendel, by John Gardner (L 920)*

Tragic play: Hamlet, by Shakespeare (L 1390)

Tragic play: Macbeth, by Shakespeare (L 1350)

Epic poem: TheOdyssey, by Homer (L 1210) *

Tragic play: OedipusRex, by Sophocles (L 1090)*

Tragic play: Antigone, by Sophocles (L 1090)*

Tragic play: DeathofaSalesman, by Arthur Miller

Tragic play: Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams

Novel: Thousand Splendid Suns, by Khalid Hosseini (L 830)*

CAUTION - * Indicates that the Lexile level of the text is below the recommended Lexile range for that grade level.


AnEssayonMan by Alexander Pope (Suggest Epistle II)
CarlJungarchetypes, www.carl-jung.net
Nobody'sArchetype (Condoleeza Rice), The Washington Post
ANewMethodofIdentifyingArchetypalSymbolsandtheirAssociatedMeanings, European Journal of Social Sciences
MichelleObama’sPopularityandAmerica’sObsessiveGaze, Washington Post
ADifficultWoman- TheChallengingLifeandTimesofLillianHellman’ byAliceKessler-Harris, Washington Post
Reopenedcivilrightscasesevokepainfulpast (Southernarchetype), The Washington Post
Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth with Bill Moyers, PBS interview

Excerpt from Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth, with Bill Moyers, www.whidby.com

Excerpt from The Power of Myth: Sacrifice and Bliss, by Joseph Campbell, mycaravanofdreams.com


Twelfth Grade

Unit 2

Glossary of Key Terms




Key Term

Definition

Allegory

Any writing that has a double meaning. Allegory acts as an extended metaphor in which persons, abstract ideas, or events represent not only themselves on a literal level, but also stand for something else on a symbolic level. An allegorical reading usually involves moral or spiritual concepts that may be more significant than the actual, literal events described in a narrative.

Archetype

An original model or pattern from which other later copies are made, especially a character, an action, or situation that seems to represent common patterns of human life. Often, archetypes include a symbol, a theme, a setting, or a character that some critics think have a common meaning in an entire culture, or even the entire human race. These images have particular emotional resonance and power.

Campbell’s heroic cycle

Joseph Campbell’s seventeen stage description of the heroic cycle from his book The Hero with a Thousand Faces.

Catharsis

The purging of the emotions or relieving of emotional tensions, especially through certain kinds of art or literature, particularly tragedy.

Characterization

The creation and convincing representation of fictional characters.

Internal conflict

Psychological struggles within the mind of a literary or dramatic character.

External conflict

Struggle between a literary or dramatic character and an outside force such as nature or another character,which drives the action of the plot.

Epiphany

An experience of sudden and striking realization. Generally the term is used to describe breakthrough scientific, religious or philosophical discoveries but it can apply in any situation in which an enlightening realization allows a problem or situation to be understood from a new and deeper perspective.

Hamartia

Hamartia, also called tragic flaw, inherent defect or shortcoming in the hero of a tragedy, who is in other respects a superior being favored by fortune. Aristotle introduced the term in the Poetics in describing the tragic hero as a man of noble rank and nature whose misfortune is not brought about by villainy but by some “error of judgment” (hamartia). This imperfection later came to be interpreted as a moral flaw, such as Othello’s jealousy or Hamlet’s irresolution. Importantly, the hero’s suffering and its far-reaching reverberations are far out of proportion to his flaw.

Hubris

Arrogance, excessive self-pride and self-confidence. The word was used to refer to the emotions in Greek tragic heroes that led them to ignore warnings from the gods and thus invite catastrophe. It is considered a form of hamartia or tragic flaw that stems from overbearing pride and lack of piety.

Myth

A story involving man’s encounters with the divine which is passed down through a culture in an attempt to teach the customs and ideals of a society.

Paradox

A statement that is apparently self-contradictory or absurd but really contains a possible truth. Sometimes the term is applied to a self-contradictory false proposition. It is also used to describe an opinion or statement that is contrary to generally accepted ideas. Often, a paradox is used to make a reader consider the point in a new way.

The term is from the Greek paradoxos, meaning “contrary to received opinion” or “expectation.”

An example of paradox is contained in Caesar’s speech from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar:

Cowards die many times before their deaths.

Act II, scene ii : line 32


Tragedy

A dramatic composition, often in verse, dealing with a serious or somber theme, typically that of a great person destined through a flaw of character or conflict with some overpowering force, as fate or society, to downfall, death or destruction.




Unit 2 Planning and Notes




Twelfth Grade Unit 3 Theme: The Quest for Utopia
In this unit students will analyze the societal structures and man’s place within those structures which contribute to the quest for an ideal society.


Essential Question

Supporting Questions

Key Terms

Writing Focus

Science Connections

Social Studies Connections

What is an ideal society—and who decides?


  • What systems of government exist

  • What drives us ­to seek a utopian society?

  • Is utopia attainable? At what cost?

  • What is the “good life”?

  • Has the concept of “utopia” changed over time or across cultures and societies?

  • Why do dystopian societies emerge?

  • How has science improved society?

  • Who benefits from technologies? / What are the societal concerns?

  • Why do our attempts at building utopias fail?

  • How do we negotiate the demands of development and responsible allocation of resources and environmental conservation?

  • How does Science Fiction reflect our innate desire for utopia?

  • Propaganda

  • Satire

  • Utopia

  • Dystopia

  • Humanism

  • Humanities

  • Existentialism


Informative/

Explanatory

(rhetorical analysis)
Argument

(foundational research skills)



How has science improved society?

Who benefits from technologies?/ What are the societal concerns of technology?



What are some legitimate and illegitimate uses of genetic engineering?


How do we negotiate the demands of development and responsible allocation of resources and environmental conservation?
How do different government systems (democracy, theocracy, republic, aristocracy, monarchy, anarchy) influence society and the individual’s quality of life?
How do socio-economic systems (Capitalism, Socialism, Communism, Feudalism) influence society and the individual’s quality of life?




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