Twelfth Grade



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ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

READING

RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • I can cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

  • I can cite specific material from the text, draw inferences from the text, and determine where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RL.11-12.6: Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

  • I can analyze a text’s point of view that specifically requires using satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement.

RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • I can examine how the author chooses to structure the text.

  • I can determine how the structure contributes to the meaning of the text.

RI.11-12.3: Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

  • I can understand the sequence and development of individuals, ideas, and events.

  • I can understand that individuals, ideas, and events can interact and develop over the course of a text.




RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

  • I can evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats to solve a problem.

  • I can integrate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g. visually, quantitatively) to address a question or solve a problem.

ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets


WRITING


W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

I can write an argument using valid reasoning with relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.11-12.1 (a). Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

  • I can identify significant and opposing arguments.

  • I can logically sequence claims, counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.



W.11-12.1 (b). Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

  • I can develop claims and counterclaims with relevant evidence.

I can identify the strengths and limitations of claims and counterclaims while anticipating the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

W.11-12.1 (c). Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

  • I can use syntax (sentence fluency) to clarify the relationships among my claims, reasons, and counterclaims.



W.11-12.1 (d). Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

  • I can use appropriate style and tone to create a written product.

  • I can use correct and appropriate conventions in my writing.




W.11-12.1 (e). Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

  • I can provide a concluding statement that supports my argument.




W 11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • I can develop, organize, and create clear and coherent writing in multiple genres.

I can write pieces that are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W 11-12.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, re-writing, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing on what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience

  • I can use multiple techniques of editing and revision to develop writing pieces with purpose

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.


  • I can use technology to produce, publish and update individual writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • I can use technology to produce, publish and update shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

W.11-12.7: Conduct short (as well as more sustained) research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • I can answer a question (including self-generated) or solve a problem through short as well as sustained research.

I can narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate and combine multiple sources to demonstrate my understanding of the topic.

W.11-12.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

  • I can determine authoritative and accurate sources from inferior sources and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each source.

  • I can use a variety of print and digital sources and use advanced searches effectively.

  • I can identify the task, purpose, and audience of my research.

  • I can include balanced research information smoothly into my piece.

  • I can understand the difference between plagiarism and my own work and cite my sources in a standard citation format.

W.11-12.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

  • I can draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W 11-12.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • I can write over extended and shorter time frames for a range of purposes and tasks.










ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

SPEAKING & LISTENING


SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

  • I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, teacher-led).

  • I can initiate and participate with diverse partners on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues.

  • I can initiate and participate in discussions and build on others’ ideas.

  • I can initiate and participate in discussions and express my own ideas clearly and persuasively.




SL.11-12.1 (a): Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

  • I can come to class prepared, having read and researched the material.

I can use my reading and research as evidence for a thought, well-reasoned class discussion.

SL.11-12.1 (b): Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.

  • I can work with peers to help create a civil and democratic discussion and promote decision-making.

  • I can work with peers to set clear goals, deadlines, and establish individual roles.

SL.11-12.1 (c): Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

  • I can pose and respond to questions that examine reasoning and evidence.

  • I can listen to a variety of positions on a topic or issue.

  • I can clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

  • I can promote differing and creative perspectives.

SL.11-12.1 (d): Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • I can respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives.

  • I can blend comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue.

  • I can use research to provide additional information to investigate, resolve contradictions, and complete the task.

SL.11-12.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks.

  • I can present the information and supporting evidence to convey a clear point of view.

  • I can present information so listeners can follow my line of reasoning.

  • I can address alternative or opposing perspectives.

  • I can use appropriate organization, development, substance, and style to establish a purpose and audience.

SL.11-12.5: Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

  • I can use digital media in presentations to increase understanding of evidence and reasoning.

  • I can effectively use digital media to add interest.









ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

LANGUAGE

L 11-12.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11-12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

  • I can determine the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words

L 11-12.4 (a): Use contexts (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

  • I can use the strategy of context clues to determine the meaning of words.



Unit 3 Text Resources


Literary

Informational

Novel: Utopia, byThomasMore (L 1390)

Novel: Gulliver’sTravels,byJonathanSwift (L 460)*

Short Story: AGoodManisHardtoFind, byFlanneryO’Connor

Short Novel: NewsFromNowhere,byWilliamMorris

Essay: TheCommunistManifesto, byKarlMarxandFriedrichEngels

Novel: TheFountainhead, byAynRand (excerpt, HowardRoark’scourtroomspeech) (L 780)*

Novel: Brave New World, by Aldus Huxley (L 1060)

Novel: Brave New World Revisited, by Aldus Huxley (L 1360)

ShortStory: Earth’sHolocaust, byNathanielHawthorne
CAUTION - * Indicates that the Lexile level of the text is below the recommended Lexile range for that grade level.


APrimeronExistentialism by Gordon Bigelow
AtIssue: GeneticEngineering” by ProQuest Staff, ProQuest LLC (L 1180)
WakeMeUpWhenMenGetPregnant” by Tim Cavanaugh, Reason (L 1200)
ChoosingBabies” by Emily Singer, Technology Review (L 1340)
CoalitionUrgesTighterControlson ‘ExtremeGeneticEngineering’” by Brian Vastag, Washington Post (L 1410)
Creation of a Transgenic Animal, from Animation Archive on www.learner.org



Twelfth Grade

Unit 3

Glossary of Key Terms




Key Term

Definition

Democracy

Literally, rule by the people. The term is derived from the Greek dēmokratiā, which was coined from dēmos (“people”) and kratos (“rule”) in the middle of the 5th Century BC to denote the political systems then existing in some Greek city-states, notably Athens.

Republic

Form of government in which a state is ruled by representatives elected by its populace. The term was originally applied to a form of government in which the leader is periodically appointed under a constitution; it was contrasted with governments in which leadership is hereditary. A republic may also be distinguished from direct democracy, though modern representative democracies are by and large republics.

Aristocracy

Government by a relatively small privileged class or by a minority consisting of those felt to be best qualified to rule. Conceived by the Greek philosophers Plato (c. 428/427–348/347 BC) and Aristotle (384–322 BC), aristocracy means the rule of the few best—the morally and intellectually superior—governing in the interest of the entire population. Such a form of government differs from the rule of one (by a monarchy or tyrant), of the ambitious, self-interested, or greedy few (oligarchy), or of the many (democracy).

Constitutional Monarchy

System of government in which a monarch shares power with a constitutionally organized government. The monarch may be the de facto head of state or a purely ceremonial leader. The constitution allocates the rest of the government’s power to the legislature and judiciary. Examples: Great Britain, Belgium, Cambodia, Jordan, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Thailand.

Anarchy

Cluster of doctrines and attitudes centered on the belief that government is both harmful and unnecessary. Derived from the Greek root anarchos (“without authority”).

Capitalism

Economic system in which most of the means of production are privately owned. Production is guided by and income distributed largely through the operation of markets. Also referred to as Free Market Economy.

Satire

An artistic form in which human or individual vices, follies, abuses, or shortcomings are held up to censure by means of ridicule, derision, irony, parody, caricature, or other methods, sometimes with an intent to inspire social reform.

Socialism

Social and economic doctrine that calls for public rather than private ownership or control of property and natural resources. According to the socialist view, individuals do not live or work in isolation but live in cooperation with one another. Furthermore, everything that people produce is in some sense a social product, and everyone who contributes to the production of a good is entitled to a share in it. Society as a whole, therefore, should own or at least control property for the benefit of all its members.

Communism

The political and economic doctrine that aims to replace private property and a profit-based economy with public ownership and communal control of at least the major means of production (e.g., mines, mills, and factories) and the natural resources of a society. Thus, communism is considered a form of socialism, a higher and more advanced form, according to its advocates. Exactly how communism differs from socialism has long been a matter of debate, but the distinction rests largely on the communists’ adherence to the revolutionary socialism of Karl Marx.

Feudalism

1. A political and economic system of Europe from the 9th to about the 15th century, based on the holding of all land in fief or fee and the resulting relation of lord to vassal and characterized by homage, legal and military service of tenants, and forfeiture.

2. A political, economic, or social order resembling this medieval system.



Existentialism

Chiefly 20th century philosophical movement embracing diverse doctrines but centering on analysis of individual existence in an unfathomable universe and the plight of the individual who must assume ultimate responsibility for acts of free will without any certain knowledge of what is right or wrong or good or bad.

Classical Humanism

A group of philosophies and ethical perspectives which emphasize the value and agency of human beings, individually and collectively, and generally prefers individual thought over established doctrine or faith; originating in the Italian Renaissance (tied to classical Greek and Latin literature and the Humanities)

Humanities

Academic disciplines that study human culture, including ancient and modern languages, literature, philosophy, religion, visual and performing arts

Propaganda

Biased or misleading information used to promote a particular political cause or point of view

Utopia

An ideal place or state; any visionary system of political or social perfection

Dystopia

A society characterized by human misery (i.e. squalor, disease, oppression and overcrowding)



Unit 3 Planning and Notes






Twelfth Grade Unit 4 Theme: Equity & Disparity
In this unit students will explore the causes of inequality citing textual evidence, author’s point of view while evaluating and analyzing text.


Essential Question

Supporting Questions

Key Terms

Writing Focus

Science Connections

Social Studies Connections

How does literature depict and inform the reader’s perceptions of equity and disparity?
What is the role of equity in society?


  • What is the difference between equity and equality?

  • What are the positives and negatives of the quest for equality?

  • Is equity attainable?

  • How does education and learning affect equity and disparity?

  • To what degree am I responsible for equity in my community?

  • How can individuals and societies protect human rights and dignity?

  • What are the causes of inequity in a community?

  • What are the consequences of inequity in a community?

  • What systems of segregation are institutionalized in our society?

  • How does accessibility affect equity and disparity?




Equality, Cultural Identity, Disparity, Ethics,

Ethnocentrism, Oppression, Pluralism, Tolerance, Multiculturalism, Assimilation, Equity





Argument

(synthesis essay)




How does science influence the politics and economics of a society?
How does scientific knowledge and technology influence equity or disparity between people?


How can individuals and societies protect human rights and dignity?
To what degree am I responsible for equity in my community?
What systems of segregation are institutionalized in our society?









ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

READING

RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • I can cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

  • I can cite specific material from the text, draw inferences from the text, and determine where the text leaves matters uncertain.




RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

  • I can analyze multiple versions of a story, drama, or poem.

  • I can evaluate how multiple versions of a story, drama, or poem interpret the source text.




RI.11-12.3: Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

  • I can analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.




RI.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

  • I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text.

RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

  • I can evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats to solve a problem.

  • I can integrate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g. visually, quantitatively) to address a question or solve a problem.

ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

WRITING

W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  • I can write an argument using valid reasoning with relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.11-12.1 (a). Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

  • I can identify significant and opposing arguments.

  • I can logically sequence claims, counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.



W.11-12.1 (b). Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

  • I can develop claims and counterclaims with relevant evidence.

  • I can identify the strengths and limitations of claims and counterclaims while anticipating the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

W.11-12.1 I. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

  • I can use syntax (sentence fluency) to clarify the relationships among my claims, reasons, and counterclaims.



W.11-12.1 (d). Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

  • I can use appropriate style and tone to create a written product.

  • I can use correct and appropriate conventions in my writing.



W.11-12.1 (e). Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

  • I can provide a concluding statement that supports my argument.



W 11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • I can develop, organize, and create clear and coherent writing in multiple genres.

  • I can write pieces that are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W 11-12.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, re-writing, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing on what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience



  • I can use multiple techniques of editing and revision to develop writing pieces with purpose

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.


  • I can use technology to produce, publish and update individual writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • I can use technology to produce, publish and update shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.




W.11-12.7: Conduct short (as well as more sustained) research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • I can answer a question (including self-generated) or solve a problem through short as well as sustained research.

  • I can narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate and combine multiple sources to demonstrate my understanding of the topic.

W.11-12.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

  • I can determine authoritative and accurate sources from inferior sources and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each source.

  • I can use a variety of print and digital sources and use advanced searches effectively.

  • I can identify the task, purpose, and audience of my research.

  • I can include balanced research information smoothly into my piece.

  • I can understand the difference between plagiarism and my own work and cite my sources in a standard citation format.

W.11-12.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

  • I can draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W 11-12.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • I can write over extended and shorter time frames for a range of purposes and tasks.

ELA Core Standards

  • Student Learning Targets




SL.11-12.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.




  • I can include multiple sources of information, in a variety of formats and media, to make decisions and solve problems.

  • I can evaluate the credibility of sources and note the differences among the sources.

ELA Core Standards

  • Student Learning Targets

LANGUAGE

L.11-12.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

  • I can demonstrate an understanding of standard English conventions including capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.

L.11-12.2 (a): Observe hyphenation conventions

  • I can use hyphens correctly.

L.11-12.2 (b): Spell correctly.

  • I can use correct spelling.

L.11-12.5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

  • I can demonstrate an understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and the distinction in words meanings.

L.11-12.5 (a): Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

  • I can identify figures of speech in the text.

I can analyze the impact of figures of speech in the text.

L.11-12.5 (b): Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • I can analyze the nuances (tone) in the meaning of words with similar meanings.




Unit 4 Text Resources


Literary

Informational

Play: Pygmalionby George Bernard Shaw (1340L)

Novel: Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy (1160L) *

Novel: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (1070L) *

Novel: Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver (900L)*

Literary nonfiction: Mao’s Last Dancer by Mao (810L)*



HarrisonBergeronbyKurtVonnegut

Children’s literature: If the World Were a Village (1350L)

Novel: A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry

Novel: Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai

Novel: Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See

Literary nonfiction: ShootinganElephant by George Orwell

Poetry: Junior College by Gary Soto

Poetry: Elements of the San Joaquin Valley by Gary Soto

Novel: Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese

CAUTION - * Indicates that the Lexile level of the text is below the recommended Lexile range for that grade level.




Essay: MeditationXVII by John Donne



Economicinequalityisthewrongissue, TheWashingtonPost

BuffetTax” andtruthinnumbers, TheWashingtonPost



Downwithrent, upwithfairness, TheWashingtonPost

WhySocialSecurityiswelfare, TheWashingtonPost

WhySocialSecurityisNOTwelfare, Economist’sView

Whatisfairabout 47 percentinU.S. payingnofederaltaxes?, TheDeseretNews

I’mcountingeverypenny, TheDailyBeast



Studentloansrequirehomework, TheWashingtonPost

Cruelandunusual—atestcase, TheWashingtonPost

Texasmanwronglyputawayfor 18 yearsdeniedcompensation, YahooNews

ShouldtheU.S. legalizeharddrugs?, TheWashingtonPost

Gettingbackinthegame, TheSaltLakeTribune

AnendtoAIDSiswithinourreach, TheWashingtonPost

Solitarytorture, TheWashingtonPost

Same-sexmarriage: empathyorright?, TheWashingtonPost

Twelfth Grade

Unit 4

Glossary of Key Terms




Key Term

Definition

Equality

The state of being equal in quantity, degree, value, rank or ability.

Cultural Identity

The identity of a group or culture, or of an individual as far as one is influenced by one's belonging to a group or culture. 

Disparity

The lack of similarity or equality; inequality; difference

Ethics

A branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong.

Ethnocentrism

Judging another culture solely by the standards and values of one’s own culture; the belief of superiority in one’s own ethnic group

Oppression

The exercise of authority or power in a burdensome, cruel, or unjust manner.

Pluralism

State of society in which members of diverse ethnic, racial, religious, or social groups maintain their traditional culture within a common civilization

Tolerance

A fair, objective, and permissive attitude toward those whose opinions, practices, race, religion, nationality, etc., differ from one's own; freedom from bigotry.

Multiculturalism

A body of thought in political philosophy about the proper way to respond to cultural and religious diversity, in which recognition and positive accommodation of group differences are the norm

Assimilation

A process by which a group’s native language or culture conforms to those of another group

Equity

Equity (law), a branch of jurisprudence in common law jurisdictions

Equity (economics), the study of fairness in economics

Educationalequity, the study and achievement of fairness in education

Intergenerationalequity, equality and fairness in relationships between people in different generations (including those yet to be born).

Equitytheory, on the relations and perceptions of fairness in distributions of resources within social and professional situations.

Employmentequity (Canada), policy requiring or encouraging preferential treatment in employment practices for certain designated groups

Healthequity, fairness and justice in health and healthcare



Unit 4 Planning and Notes






Twelfth Grade Unit 5 Theme: Change and Tradition
In this unit students will explore the processes of constructing their own world views.

They will pose and answer a question or solve a problem through sustained, multi-media research.


Essential Question

Supporting Questions

Key Terms

Writing Focus

Science Connections

Social Studies Connections

How does the dissonance between tradition and change shape individuals and societies?
How does my current knowledge and experience fit with or conflict with new knowledge and experience?

  • What are the variables that discourage or encourage change in society?

  • How has science shaped career paths over history?

  • What is my mental schema?

  • How do individuals react to change and cognitive dissonance?

Cognitive Dissonance, Paradigm Shift, Metacognition


Argument
Capstone research project”

  • How has science affect superstition and shift perspectives and paradigms?

  • How does science affect the quality of life, how have technology advances influence the progress of science?

  • How are theories and scientific evidence validated?

  • How does the quantity and quality of evidence influence decision-making and change?

Who or what determines whether a tradition is changed or sustained?

What factors and social movements elicited social change, and what factors have discouraged change?










ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

READING

RL.11-12.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • I can cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

  • I can cite specific material from the text, draw inferences from the text, and determine where the text leaves matters uncertain.



RL.11-12.3: Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

  • I can analyze how the author's choices impact the development of a story or drama.

RL.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

  • I can use text to determine the meaning of words and phrases.

  • I can determine an author's tone through analysis of word choice.

  • I can determine the figurative and connotative meaning of words and phrases.

RI.11-12.2: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • I can determine two or more central ideas of a text.

  • I can examine the central ideas of the text and how they interact together to provide meaning.

  • I can summarize the text.

RI.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

  • I can evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats to solve a problem.

  • I can integrate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g. visually, quantitatively) to address a question or solve a problem.

ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

WRITING

W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  • I can write an argument using valid reasoning with relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.11-12.1 (a). Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

  • I can identify significant and opposing arguments.

  • I can logically sequence claims, counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.




W.11-12.1 (b). Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

  • I can develop claims and counterclaims with relevant evidence.

I can identify the strengths and limitations of claims and counterclaims while anticipating the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

W.11-12.1 (c). Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

  • I can use syntax (sentence fluency) to clarify the relationships among my claims, reasons, and counterclaims.




W.11-12.1 (d). Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

  • I can use appropriate style and tone to create a written product.

  • I can use correct and appropriate conventions in my writing.




W.11-12.1 (e). Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

  • I can provide a concluding statement that supports my argument.










W 11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

  • I can develop, organize, and create clear and coherent writing in multiple genres.

  • I can write pieces that are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.11-12.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grades 11–12 on page 54.)


  • I can use multiple techniques of editing and revision to develop writing pieces with purpose.

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.


  • I can use technology to produce, publish and update individual writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • I can use technology to produce, publish and update shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

W.11-12.7: Conduct (short as well as) more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • I can answer a question (including self-generated) or solve a problem through short as well as sustained research.

  • I can narrow or broaden inquiry when appropriate and combine multiple sources to demonstrate my understanding of the topic.

W.11-12.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and over-reliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.


  • I can determine authoritative and accurate sources from inferior sources and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each source.

  • I can use a variety of print and digital sources and use advanced searches effectively.

  • I can identify the task, purpose, and audience of my research.

  • I can include balanced research information smoothly into my piece.

  • I can understand the difference between plagiarism and my own work and cite my sources in a standard citation format.

W.11-12.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

  • I can draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.11-12.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes.

  • I can write over extended and shorter time frames for a range of purposes and tasks.

ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

SPEAKING & LISTENING

SL.11-12.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.


  • I can include multiple sources of information, in a variety of formats and media, to make decisions and solve problems.

  • I can evaluate the credibility of sources and note the differences among the sources.




SL.11-12.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks.

  • I can present the information and supporting evidence to convey a clear point of view.

  • I can present information so listeners can follow my line of reasoning.

  • I can address alternative or opposing perspectives.

  • I can use appropriate organization, development, substance, and style to establish a purpose and audience.

ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

LANGUAGE

L.11-12.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

  • I can correctly use standard English conventions, grammar, and usage in writing and speaking.




L.11-12.1 (a): Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • I can understand that usage changes throughout time and apply it appropriately.




L.11-12.1 (b): Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g., Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage, Garner’s Modern American Usage) as needed.

  • I can use references to resolve issues of complex and contested usage.






Unit 5 Text Resources


Literary

Informational

Essay: AllegoryoftheCave by Plato (L 1370)

Essay: TheApology by Plato

Essay: TheHigh-MindedMan by Aristotle (930)*

Novel: Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan (L 940)*

Novel: A Light In August, by William Faulkner

Short Story: Barn Burning, by William Faulkner

Short Story: ARoseforEmily by William Faulkner (L 1270)

Novel: A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khalid Hosseini (L 830)

Novel: Kite Runner by Khalid Hosseini (L 840)*

Short Story: TheLottery by Shirley Jackson

Novel: The Help by Kathryn Stockett

Novel: Snow Flower and the Secret Fan (Footbinding chapter) by Lisa See

Novel: The Chosen by Chaim Potok (L 970)*

Novel: Bless Me Ultima by Rudolfo Anaya (L 840)*

Literary nonfiction: The Color of Water by James McBride
CAUTION - * Indicates that the Lexile level of the text is below the recommended Lexile range for that grade level


TheMythofAssimilation (L 1300)

OneNation, Indivisible? (L 1530)

Sweatoftheirbrowsreshapeseconomy (L 1320)

EthnicShifts Graph



ForeignersAdaptQuickly (L 1350)

PowerpointImmigration Survey

AMuslimAmericanreflectsonOsamabinLaden’sDeath, The Washington Post

ShowingMyColor: ImpoliteEssaysonRaceandIdentity, by Clarence Page

Transgenderat 5, The Washington Post

TheAfghanGirlsWhoLiveasBoys, BBC News Magazine


Twelfth Grade

Unit 5

Glossary of Key Terms




Key Term

Definition

Dissonance

Lack of agreement, consistency, or harmony; conflict

Cognitive Dissonance

A discomfort caused by holding conflicting cognitions (e.g., ideas, beliefs, values, emotional reactions) simultaneously. In a state of dissonance, people may feel surprise, dread, guilt, anger, or embarrassment. The theory of cognitive dissonance in socialpsychologyproposes that people have a motivationaldriveto reduce dissonance by altering existing cognitions, adding new ones to create a consistent belief system, or alternatively by reducing the importance of any one of the dissonant elements.

Paradigm Shift

A radical change in underlying beliefs or theory; a fundamental change in approach or assumptions.

Metacognition

"Cognition about cognition," or "knowing about knowing." It includes knowledge about when and how to use particular strategies for learning or for problem solving.



Unit 5 Planning and Notes






Twelfth Grade Unit 6 Theme: Transition to Adulthood
In this unit students will examine the internal and external forces that shape their identity and maturity.


Essential Question

Supporting Questions

Key Terms

Writing Focus

Science Connections

Social Studies Connections

What qualities, characteristics, and events contribute to shaping your identity?



  • What is maturity?

  • What external forces shape your identity?

  • What personal choices shape your identity?

  • How do we grow up by adapting to our environment?

  • How do you navigate the journey from adolescence to adulthood?

Quest, Bildungsroman


Narrative

(letter of advice for incoming Freshmen)


(completion and presentation of Capstone project)


What is the role of environment versus DNA in shaping identity?


How do we grow up by adapting to our environment?







ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

READING

RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • I can determine two or more themes of a text and analyze their development over the course of a text.

  • I can determine how texts interact and build on one another to produce a complex account.

  • I can provide an unbiased summary of the text.

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).


  • I can analyze how the author's choices impact the development of a story or drama.

RL.11-12.6. Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).


  • I can analyze a text's point of view that specifically requires using satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement.




RL.11-12.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

  • I can analyze multiple versions of a story, drama, or poem.

  • I can evaluate how multiple versions of a story, drama, or poem interpret the source text.



RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 11–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.


  • I can read and comprehend difficult texts independently and proficiently.




RI.11-12.3: Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

  • I can analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.



RI.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

  • I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text.

RI.11-12.5. Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.


  • I can examine how the author chooses to structure the text.

  • I can determine how the structure contributes to the meaning of the text.

  • I can evaluate whether the structure is clear, convincing, and engaging.

RI.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in at the high end of the grades 11-CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.

  • I can read and comprehend difficult texts independently and proficiently.






ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

WRITING

W.11-12.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  • I can write narratives that develop real or imagined experiences or events.

  • I can use effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences to write my narrative.

W.11-12.3 (a): Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

  • I can create a problem, situation, or observation that is engaging and communicate its importance to the reader.

  • I can establish one or more points of view and introduce a narrator and/or characters.

  • I can create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3 (b): Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

  • I can use narrative techniques (such as dialogue, packing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines) to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3 (c): Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

  • I can use a variety of techniques to sequence events that build on one another to create a meaningful whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome.

W.11-12.3 (d): Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

  • I can use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3 (e): Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • I can write a conclusion that reflects on what is experienced and resolved over the course of the narrative.







ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets


SPEAKING AND LISTENING





SL.11-12.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.


  • I can initiate and participate in discussions.

  • I can discuss with diverse partners about texts, and issues, while building on others ideas.

  • I can express my ideas clearly and persuasively.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

  • I can come to class prepared, having read and researched the material.

  • I can use my reading and research as evidence for a thoughtful, well-reasoned class discussion.

b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.


  • I can work with peers to help create a civil and democratic discussion and promote decision-making.

  • I can work with peers to set clear goals, deadlines, and establish individual roles.

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.


  • I can pose and respond to questions that examine reasoning and evidence.

  • I can listen to a variety of positions on a topic or issue.

  • I can clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

I can promote differing and creative perspectives.

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • I can respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives.

  • I can blend comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue.

  • I can use research to provide additional information to investigate, resolve contradictions, and complete the task.







ELA Core Standards

Student Learning Targets

LANGUAGE

L.11-12.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • I can gather and use academic words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level.

  • I can independently determine a word or phrase's importance.



Unit 6 Text Resources


Literary

Informational

Literary nonfiction: Growing Up by Russel Baker (L 1090)*

Novel: Lord of the Flies by William Golding (L 770)*

Novel: Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger (L 790)*

Novel: Tess of D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy (L 680)*

Novel: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (L 840)*

Novel: The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (L 730)*

William Blake SongsofInnocence, SongsofExperience (ex: The Chimney Sweep)

Short Story: ChildbyTiger by Thomas Wolfe

Novel (excerpt): The Adrian Mole Diaries, by Sue Townsend

Novel: Empire of the Sun by J. G. Ballard (L 1130)

CAUTION - * Indicates that the Lexile level of the text is below the recommended Lexile range for that grade level.


Modernlove: Mydrop-outboyfriendkeptdroppingin, The New York Times

Modernlove: Let'snotgettoknoweachother, TheNewYorkTimes

Modernlove: Let'snotgettoknoweachotherbetter, NewYorkTimes

Modernlove: Sharingtheshameaftermyarrest, NewYorkTimes

KatyButler: Anewvoiceagainstbullying,WashingtonPost

Highschoolstudentpretendstobepregnantforsenior

project, Fox News

GabyRodriguezhighschoolstudentfakedpregnancy,TheDailyMail

Anidealofservicetoourfellowman (byAlbertEinstein), NPR.org

Makingroomfordad'snewgirlfriend The Daily Beast

HowtoGrowupinNineEasySteps, Wikihow

CommencementSpeakerBlastsStudents, The Washington Post


Twelfth Grade

Unit 6

Glossary of Key Terms



Key Term

Definition

Quest

1. A search or pursuit made in order to find or obtain something: a quest for uranium mines; a quest for knowledge.

2. An adventurous expedition undertaken by a knight or knights to secure or achieve something: the quest of the Holy Grail.

Bildungsroman

A novel about the moral and psychological growth of the main character.




Unit 6 Planning and Notes






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