Transitioning to the Common Core State Standards



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Transitioning to the Common Core State Standards

  • California Transcribers and Educators of the Blind and Visually Impaired
  • April 4, 2014

College and Career Readiness Standards

  • In 2009, the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) committed to developing a set of standards that would help prepare students for success in college and career.
  • In September 2009, College and Career Readiness standards were released.
  • This work became the foundation for the Common Core.

The Common Core State Standards

  • Feedback and review from national organizations, including:

The Common Core State Standards

  • Benefits:
  • Internationally benchmarked
  • Evidence and research-based
  • Consistent expectations – no matter where you live
  • Opportunity for shared resources and reduced costs

California and the Common Core State Standards

  • Senate Bill 1 from the Fifth Extraordinary Session (SB X5 1):
    • Established an Academic Content Standards Commission (ACSC) to develop standards in mathematics and English–language arts
    • Stated that 85 percent of the standards were to consist of the CCSS with up to 15 percent additional material
    • Directed the State Board of Education to adopt or reject recommendations of the ACSC
  • Source: http://www.corestandards.org/in-the-states
  • TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Common Core Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

  • The CCSS for English-Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects are organized around the College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards for Reading, Writing, and Speaking and Listening.
  • Each strand is headed by a set of CCR Anchor Standards that is identical across all grades and content areas.
  • The anchor standards lend coherence to the document both across the content areas and across the grades.

Balanced Representation of Literary and Informational Text

  • Kindergarten through grade 5
    • 10 Reading standards for literature
    • 10 Reading standards for informational text
    • Writing standards that explicitly call for opinion pieces, narratives, and informative/explanatory texts
  • Grades 6–12
    • 10 Reading standards for literature
    • 10 Reading standards for informational text
    • Writing standards that explicitly call for arguments, narratives, and informative/explanatory texts
    • An additional set of standards for reading and writing in history/social studies, science and technical subjects

Informational Text

  • Includes the subgenres of exposition, argument, and functional text in the form of personal essays, speeches, opinion pieces, essays about art or literature, biographies, memoirs, journalism, and historical, scientific, technical, or economic accounts (including digital sources) written for a broad audience
  • Source: page 33 of the CCSS for ELA and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects: Grades 6–12

  • Set the expectation that students will read and write in non-ELA classrooms and develop informational/technical writing skills
  • Provide an acknowledgement of unique text structures found in informational text
  • Maintain the focus on discipline-specific vocabulary, critical analysis, and evidence across the curriculum

Technical Subjects

  • Technical subjects – A course devoted to a practical study, such as engineering, technology, design, business, or other workforce-related subject; a technical aspect of a wider field of study, such as art or music
  • Source: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects: Appendix A

Critical Analysis/Use of Evidence

  • Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text. (2.RI.8)
  • Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced. (8.SL.3)
  • Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases. (11-12.WHST.1.b)

Focus on Text Complexity

  • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. (5.RL.10)
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • (11-12.SL.1)

Increased Student Collaboration

  • With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others. (3.W.6)
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. (9-10.SL.1)

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

  • Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts. (K.L.6)
  • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. (7.W.2.d)
  • Determine the meaning of word and phrase as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone). (9-10.RL.4)

Increased Use of Multimedia and Technology

  • Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas and themes. (4.SL.5)
  • Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film). (7.RL.7)
  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem. (11-12.RST.7)

Transitioning to the CCSS

  • Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction
  • Reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational
  • Regular practice with complex text and its academic language
  • Source: http://www.achievethecore.org/steal-these-tools

Mathematical Proficiency as defined by the California Framework (2006)

Common Core Standards for Mathematics

  • The standards for mathematics:
    • Are focused, coherent, and rigorous
    • Aim for clarity and specificity
    • Stress conceptual understanding of key ideas
    • Balance mathematical understanding and procedural skill
    • Are internationally benchmarked

Two Types of Interrelated Standards

      • Mathematical Practices (the same at every grade level)
      • Mathematical Content (different at each grade level)

CCSS Domains K–5

  • Domain
  • K
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Counting and Cardinality (CC)
  • Operations and Algebraic Thinking (OA)
  • Number and Operations in Base Ten (NBT)
  • Measurement and Data (MD)
  • Geometry (G)
  • Number and Operations – Fractions (NF)

CCSS Domains 6–8

  • Domain
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • Ratios and Proportional Relationships (RP)
  • The Number System (NS)
  • Expressions and Equations (EE)
  • Geometry (G)
  • Statistics and Probability (SP)
  • Functions (F)

Transition to Common Core Grade Shifts: K–2

  • Concept
  • 1997 Standards
  • CCSS
  • Count from 30 to 100
  • Grade
  • 1
  • K
  • Skip count by 2s, 5s, and 10s to 100
  • Grade
  • 1
  • Grade
  • 2
  • Know from memory the multiplication tables for 2s and 5s
  • *CCSS 3.OA.7-Know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers
  • Grade
  • 2
  • Grade
  • 3*
  • Introduction to fractions as numbers
  • Grade
  • 2
  • Grade
  • 3
  • Grade
  • 2
  • Grade
  • 6

Transition to Common Core Grade Shifts: Grades 3–5

  • Content
  • 1997 CA Standards
  • Grade
  • Common Core
  • Grade
  • Introduction to fractions as numbers
  • 2
  • 3
  • Add and subtract simple fractions, with like denominators
  • 3
  • 4
  • Multiply a fraction by a whole number and solve related word problems
  • 5
  • 4
  • Add, subtract and round decimals
  • 4
  • 5
  • 5
  • 6
  • Dividing fractions by fractions
  • 5
  • 6

Transition to Common Core Grade Shifts: 6–8

  • Concept
  • 1997 Standards
  • CCSS
  • Dividing fractions by fractions
  • Grade
  • 5
  • Grade
  • 6
  • Concepts of mean and median to summarize data sets
  • Grade
  • 5
  • Grade
  • 6
  • Operations with numbers in scientific notation
  • Grade
  • 7
  • Grade
  • 8
  • Pythagorean Theorem
  • Grade
  • 7
  • Grade
  • 8

High School Mathematics

  • The CCSS high school standards are organized in 6 conceptual categories:
    • Number and Quantity
    • Algebra
    • Functions
    • Modeling (*)
    • Geometry
    • Statistics and Probability
  • California additions:
    • Advanced Placement Probability and Statistics
    • Calculus
  • Modeling standards are indicated by a (*) symbol.
  • Standards necessary to prepare for advanced courses in mathematics are indicated by a (+) symbol.

Model Course Pathways for Mathematics

  • Pathway A
  • Traditional in U.S.
  • Geometry
  • Algebra I
  • Courses in higher level mathematics: Precalculus, Calculus (upon completion of Precalculus), Advanced Statistics, Discrete Mathematics, Advanced Quantitative Reasoning, or other courses to be designed at a later date, such as additional career technical courses.
  • Pathway B
  • International Integrated approach
  • (typical outside of U.S.)
  • .
  • Mathematics II
  • Mathematics I
  • Algebra II
  • Mathematics III

Standards for Mathematical Practice

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.
  • Look for and make use of structure.
  • Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
  • Describe ways students engage with the subject matter throughout the elementary, middle and high school years

Transitioning to the CCSS

  • Focus strongly where the standards focus
  • Coherence: Think across grades, and link to major topics within grades
  • Rigor: In major topics, pursue conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application
  • Source: http://www.achievethecore.org/
  • Source: http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/cc/tl/index.asp

Professional Learning Modules

  • The professional learning modules were developed to deepen understanding of the CCSS and instructional strategies to support the learning of all pupils.
  • Thirteen modules are currently available on the CDE CCSS Professional Learning Modules for Educators Web page.

California Curriculum Frameworks

  • The 2013 Mathematics curriculum framework was adopted on November 6, 2013.
  • The DRAFT 2014 ELA/ELD curriculum framework is currently in development and will be available for a second public review in May.

Collections

  • The CDE Web pages contain links to hundreds of high quality resources to support the transition to the CCSS. Please see:
    • The CDE CCSS Clearinghouses Web page
    • The CDE CCSS Videos and Archived Presentations Web page
    • Common Core Search

Smarter Balanced Practice Tests

  • Source: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sa/practicetest.asp

Smarter Balanced Usability, Accessibility, and Accommodations Guidelines

  • Three types of student support:
    • Universal tools
    • Designated supports
    • Accommodations
    • The Guidelines document and accompanying FAQ are available online at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sa/access.asp.
  • Source: http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/cc/

CDE CCSS Web page

  • http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/cc
  • Subscribe:
  • join-commoncore@mlist.cde.ca.gov
  • subscribe-sbac@mlist.cde.ca.gov
  • Contact us: commoncoreteam@cde.ca.gov

Questions?



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