Theories on prehistory and early man constantly change as new evidence comes to light. Louis Leakey, British paleoanthropologist



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  • The Origin
  • of Humans
  • Theories on prehistory and early man constantly change as new evidence comes to light. - Louis Leakey, British paleoanthropologist
  • Early Discoveries
  • 1. 4,000,000 BCE – 1,000,000 BCE
  • 2. 1,500,000 BCE -- 250,000 BCE
  • 3. 250,000 BCE – 30,000 BCE
  • 4. 30,000 BCE -- 10,000 BCE
  • The Paleolithic Age
  • “Paleolithic” --> “Old Stone” Age
  • 2,500,000 BCE – 10,000 BCE
  • hunting (men) & gathering (women)  small bands of 20-30 humans
  • NOMADIC (moving from place to place)
  • Stage 1
  • 4,000,000 BCE – 1,000,000 BCE
  • Hominids --> any member of the family of two-legged primates that includes all humans.
  • Australopithecines
  • An Apposable Thumb
  • Stage 1
  • HOMO HABILIS ( “Man of Skills” )
  • found in East Africa.
  • created stone tools.
  • The Paleolithic Age
  • Humans during this period found shelter in caves.
  • Cave paintings left behind.
  • Purpose??
  • Stage 2
  • 1,600,000 BCE – 30,000 BCE
  • HOMO ERECTUS ( “Upright Human Being” )
  • First hominid to migrate and leave Africa for Europe and Asia.
  • First to use fire ( 500,000 BCE )
  • BIPEDALISM
  • Are we all Africans “under the skin”????
  • Stage 3
  • 200,000 BCE – 10,000 BCE
  • HOMO SAPIENS ( “Wise Human Being” )
  • Neanderthals ( 200,000 BCE – 30,000 BCE )
  • Cro-Magnons ( 40,000 BCE – 10,000 BCE )
  • Stage 3
  • NEANDERTHALS:
  • Neander Valley, Germany (1856)
  • First humans to bury their dead.
  • Made clothes from animal skins.
  • Lived in caves and tents.
  • Stage 3
  • NEANDERTHALS
  • Early Hut/Tent
  • Stage 3
  • CRO-MAGNONs:
  • Homo sapiens sapiens ( “Wise, wise human” )
  • By 30,000 BCE they replaced Neanderthals.
  • WHY???
  • The Last Ice Age
  • 70,000 BCE – 10,000 BCE
  • “Neolithic”  “New Stone” Age
  • 10,000 BCE – 4,000 BCE
  • Gradual shift from:
  • Nomadic lifestyle  settled, stationery lifestyle.
  • Hunting/Gathering  agricultural production and domestication of animals.
  • 8,000 BCE – 5,000 BCE
  • Agriculture developed independently in different parts of the world.
  • Middle East India Central America China Southeast Asia
  • 8,000 BCE 7,000 BCE 6,500 BCE 6,000 BCE 5,000 BCE
  • The Agricultural Revolution
  • Development
  • of Agriculture
  • ?
  • ?
  • ?
  • ?
  • The Agricultural Revolution
  • Why do you think the development of agriculture occurred around the same time in several different places?
  • The Agricultural Revolution
  • Why do some archaeologists believe that women were the first farmers?
  • Growing crops on a regular basis made possible the support of larger populations.
  • More permanent, settled communities emerged.
  • 9,000 BCE  Earliest Agricultural Settlement at JARMO ( northern Iraq )  wheat
  • Early Settled Communities
  • 8,000 BCE  Largest Early Settlement at Çatal Hüyük ( Modern Turkey )  6,000 inhabitants
  • Division of labor
  • Organized religion
  • 12 cultivated crops
  • An obsidian dagger
  • Early Settled Communities
  • Çatal Hüyük
  • The Agricultural Revolution
  • What role did the food supply play in shaping the nomadic life of hunter-gatherers and the settled life of the farmers?
  • Why is the
  • "Neolithic Revolution"
  • a turning point
  • in human history??
  • What is the
  • next step in the
  • development of
  • human settlements??
  • CIVILIZATIONS !!
  • CITIES !
  • What are the
  • characteristics
  • of a civilization??
  • Advanced
  • Cities
  • CIVILIZATION
  • Specialized
  • Workers
  • Complex
  • Institutions
  • Record-
  • Keeping
  • Advanced
  • Technology

Essay Prompt

  • Analyze and explain why the development of systematic agriculture by the Neolithic people deserves to be called a revolution.


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