The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function.”



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Enrichment Seminar: AP Language & Composition

Andover High School

Mr. Lindblad

E-mail: eric.lindblad@anoka.k12.mn.us



The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability

to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the

same time, and still retain the ability to function.”

F. Scott Fitzgerald








Course Description: This is a college level course that focuses on critical thinking, reading, and writing through the study and discussion of narrative, expository, analytical, argumentative, and creative writing. Emphasis will be placed on the student's organization, personal and creative writing, research skills, discourse, vocabulary, reading, and control of language. Students will write effectively and confidently and will become skilled readers of pieces written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. One focus will be on American Literature and another will be on nonfiction works from a variety of sources. Students will also develop an understanding of how to read footnotes and how to read non-print materials such as pictures, comics, and graphs. The AP Language and Composition course assumes that students already understand and use Standard English grammar. This intense concentration on language use in the course will enhance student’s ability to use grammatical conventions both appropriately and with sophistication.
What makes AP English Language & Composition different from other high school English courses is its focus on rhetoric. While promoting writing in many contexts for a variety of purposes, the English Language course is the place where nonfiction texts and contexts take center stage. Here students think deeply about language as a persuasive tool and about the dynamic relationship of writer, context, audience, and argument.
Stylistic development will progress through emphasis on the following:

  • Progression beyond the five paragraph essay

  • Wide-ranging vocabulary used appropriately and effectively

  • Variety of sentence structures

  • Logical organization, enhanced by specific techniques to increase coherence, such as repetition, transitions, and emphasis

  • Balance of generalization and specific illustrative detail

  • Effective use of rhetoric, including controlling and identifying tone, establishing and maintaining voice, and achieving appropriate emphasis through diction and sentence structure.

  • Constructive critiques of peers’ writing

  • Various methods of invention and drafting

  • Critical reading of fiction and non-fiction materials

  • Synthesis of materials

  • Quote, summarize, and paraphrase multi modal sources (when and how)

Points Breakdown

20%: Formative Assessments (revisions, introductory FRQs, daily assignments, quick writes)

40%:Writing Summative Assessments (mastery FRQ’s, essays, projects, presentations)

30% Reading Summative Assessments (tests, quizzes, essays, projects, presentations)



10%: Common Summative Assessment (trimester final)


Materials:

Required: one notebook, one folder, black ball point ink pens (erasable if desired), post-it notes, highlighter, index cards.

Attendance Policy: A student who is present and actively participates is more likely to be successful; however, if a student is absent, he/she has 2 school days to make up work assigned on days missed and 5 days to make up seminars and tests taken on days missed. After five days, a zero will be given for the missed work. You are still responsible for meeting due dates for major papers. You can turn in work by emailing them to Mr. Lindblad. This is a college level course and instruction during class cannot be made up with a simple worksheet, handout, or reading. It is important that you are here.

Make-up Tests and Extra Help:
Eligible students may make up work or obtain extra help before or after school by appointment. Make arrangements one day ahead of time so that I can make arrangements to be available.

Late Work: If submitted after the due date and time but before the deadline, the assessment will receive a 10% penalty. If submitted after the deadline but before the end of the trimester, the assessment will receive a 50% reduction.
Turn in policy: All papers must be submitted at the beginning of the class period or emailed by the start of class if you are absent on that day (both planned, i.e. field trips, and unplanned, i.e. illness). I do not allow printing during class.
Class Guidelines

  1. If you’re out of class (bathroom, locker, career center, counselor…) I expect you to be responsible for missed information.

  2. Listen the first time; procedural directions are not repeated.

  3. I expect you to come prepared with materials and out of class work completed. Please don’t try to fake it.

  4. We will talk about a variety of issues. I expect you to be open minded and sensitive to the backgrounds, ideas, and values of others. I don’t expect you to agree with others, but I do require tolerance and kindness.

  5. Students are expected to be engaged in class during the entire class and contributing class members.

  6. I do not debate deadlines or assignments during class time.

  7. I do not discuss grades and missing work during class time. Please see me before or after school or check A-H-Connect at home.

  8. I expect you to take ownership over your learning. There are many concepts I expect you to know and many skills I expect you to have.

  9. I am always open to communicating with your parents; however, I expect you to take the initiative when questions arise, and be responsible for relaying information to your parents.



LEARNING TARGETS
Critical Reading Targets

AP students will:



  1. Read actively, interactively, and critically

  2. Develop the ability to apply critical reading and rhetorical analysis skills to multiple genres

  3. Use annotation when actively reading



Argument Analysis Targets

AP students will:



  1. Understand the application of basic appeals (ethos, logos, pathos)

  2. Develop the ability to compare texts and assess validity or effectiveness

  3. Understand the purpose of footnotes

  4. Read and analyze non-print materials

  5. Recognize the purpose and effect of non-print materials

  6. Appreciate language’s function


Argumentative Writing Targets

AP students will:



  1. Write for a specific purpose and effect in persuasive mode

  2. Make decisions regarding effective supporting material

  3. Understand how to research

  4. Synthesize supporting materials with their own argument

  5. Develop and construct effect arguments that contain adequate support and synthesis of materials.


Test Taking Targets

AP students will:



  1. Understand how to answer multiple-choice questions

  2. Develop efficient on-demand writing techniques

  3. Develop test analysis skills


Socratic Seminar Expectations and Grading




Seminar Expectations

Your discussion as a whole will be graded by both you and me. You will receive up to five points for your overall contributions based on this list:

UNSATISFACTORY (1): The student has failed to express any relevant foundational knowledge and has neither stated nor elaborated on any issues.

ADEQUATE (2): The student has accurately expressed relevant foundational knowledge pertaining to an issue raised during the deliberation and has pursued an issue by making a statement with an explanation, reasons, or evidence.

EFFECTIVE (3): The student has accurately expressed relevant foundational knowledge pertaining to an issue raised during the deliberation, pursued an issue with AT LEAST one elaborated statement, and in a civil manner, has built upon a statement made by someone else or thoughtfully challenged its accuracy, clarity, relevance, or logic.

EXEMPLARY (4): The student has accurately expressed relevant foundational knowledge pertaining to an issue raised during the deliberation, pursued an issue with an elaborate statement, and has used stipulation, valuing, analogy to advance the deliberation. In addition, the student has engaged others in the deliberation by inviting their comments or acknowledging their contributions. Further, the student has built upon a statement made by someone else or thoughtfully challenged its accuracy, clarity, relevance, or logic.



Positive Behaviors

Citing a Sources

Linking to Class Material

Recognizing Contradictions

Taking a Position

Summarizing the statements made in the discussion



Negative Behaviors

Irrelevant or distracting statements

Repeating what someone else has already said

Obstructive interruption

Monopolizing

Personal attack





*From “Classroom Assessment of Civil Discourse,” by D.E.Harris, 2002, In W.C. Parker (Ed.), Education for Democracy: Contexts, Curricula, Assessments, pp. 211-232.

Socratic Seminar Guidelines for Participants


  1. Read the material before participating in the seminar.

  2. Create answers for the Socratic Seminar questions. Annotate the common text with any additional post-it-notes that are needed for your prepared answers. Your answers should include quotes with page numbers from the book or other notes/references as is needed.

  3. Everyone must speak during the seminar; the more comments, questions, and discussion you give to the seminar the better your grade will be.

  4. Avoid side conversations. Your grade may be affected if you are off topic or inappropriate at any time.

  5. Engage in active listening strategies. Including, but not limited to: eye contact, non-verbal responses, and appropriate respectful behavior.

  6. Let a minimum of TWO people speak before you speak again.

  7. Avoid being a conversation-hog.

  8. Raising hands is not needed unless someone is monopolizing the conversation and you can’t get a word in edgewise. But try hard to avoid hand- raising.

  9. The seminar does not need to be or stay focused around the Seminar questions. Other questions and topics related to the text are encouraged.

  10. Responses to other’s comments should always be respectful even if you disagree with or question what was said. You are encouraged to say something like “I hear what you are saying, but have you considered this…” or “I can see your point of view on that, but I was taking a different perspective and see it like…” Remember RESPECT is the most important aspect of Socratic Seminar


IF YOU ARE ABSENT YOU CAN MAKE UP SEMINAR BY:

  1. Gather at least two classmates or people who have read the text and are able to comment on it intelligently (for a total of 3 people) for your 15-20 minute discussion. (It may be a good idea to see who else needs to make up the discussion.) You can email a recording of this discussion to me, provide me a link to a podcast, or provide me with detailed notes and signatures of all discussants and a signature of one adult who can verify the discussion occurred. See me about other acceptable formats.

  2. Staple your pre-discussion notes to the back of this. These are notes you will have put together prior to the discussion to make sure your discussion goes smoothly.

  3. Complete this within one week of your absence.

***If you are present on the day of a Seminar and CHOOSE not to participate, you are not eligible to make up a Seminar.




AP Scoring: Essay






AP English Language and Composition 9-point Rubric

9

Essays earning a score of 9 meet the criteria for 8 papers and, in addition, are especially full or apt in their analysis or demonstrate particularly impressive control of language.

8

Essays earning a score of 8 effectively respond to the prompt. They refer to the passage explicitly or implicitly and explain the function of specific strategies. Their prose demonstrates an ability to control a wide range of the elements of effective writing but is not flawless.

7

Essays earning a score of 7 fit the description of 6 essays but provide a more complete analysis or demonstrate a more mature prose style.

6

Essays earning a score of 6 adequately respond to the prompt. They refer to the passage, explicitly or implicitly, but their discussion is more limited. The writing may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but generally the prose is clear.

5

Essays earning a score of 5 analyze the strategies, but they may provide uneven or inconsistent analysis. They may treat the prompt in a superficial way or demonstrate a limited understanding of the prompt. While the writing may contain lapses in diction or syntax, it usually conveys ideas adequately.

4

Essays earning a score of 4 respond to the prompt inadequately. They may misrepresent the author's position, analyze the strategies inaccurately, or offer little discussion of specific strategies. The prose generally conveys the writer's ideas but may suggest immature control of writing.

3

Essays earning a score of 3 meet the criteria of the score of 4 but are less perceptive about the prompt or less consistent in controlling the elements of writing.

2

Essays earning a score of 2 demonstrate little success in responding to the prompt. These essays may offer vague generalizations, substitute simpler tasks such as summarizing the passage, or simply list techniques. The prose often demonstrates consistent weaknesses in writing.

1

Essays earning a score of 1 meet the criteria for the score of 2 but are undeveloped, especially simplistic in discussion, or weak in their control of language.

0

Indicates an on-topic response that receives no credit such as one that merely repeats the prompt or one that is completely off topic.

You will be asked to write the following essays:

  1. Synthesis

    1. Read critically

    2. Understand texts

    3. Analyze texts

    4. Develop a position

    5. Support your position with appropriate evidence from the sources and cite it

  2. Analytical

    1. author’s view

    2. style (tone, diction, syntax)

    3. rhetorical devices

    4. purpose, audience, exigence

  3. Argumentative

    1. The nature of the position taken in the prompt

    2. Take a stand: defend, challenge, qualify

    3. Clearly and logically support your claim

AP Scoring: Multiple Choice

Calculate what score you need to receive on each section to reach your goal at http://appass.com/calculators/englishlanguage





    1. Incorporate outside sources




Multiple-Choice Scoring:
___________________ X 1.234 = ______________ = section 1 score

# correct out of 55 multiple choice score


Essay Scoring:

Question 1 __________ (out of 9) X 3.0556 =______________

Question 2 __________ (out of 9) X 3.0556 =______________

Question 3 __________ (out of 9) X 3.0556 =______________

SUM =______________ = Section 2 score
Composite Score ________________ + ________________ = ________________

Section 1 score Section 2 score *composite score (round to nearest whole #)



Multiple choice questions center on form and content. You are being assessed on:



  1. Your understanding of the meaning of the selection

  2. Your ability to draw inferences

  3. Your ability to perceive implications based on the work

  4. Your ability to understand HOW an author develops her ideas

Multiple choice questions center on form and content. You will be assessed on:



  1. Your understanding of the meaning of the selection

  2. Your ability to draw inferences

  3. Your ability to perceive implications based on the work

  4. Your ability to understand HOW an author develops her ideas


The Composite Range to determine final scores varies from year to year.
Range AP Grade

110-150 5 Extremely Well Qualified

96-109 4 Well Qualified

77-95 3 Qualified

50-76 2 Possibly Qualified

0-49 1 No Recommendation




2015 Exam Date:

Wednesday, May 13 at 8:00am




60% of students will pass the AP Language exam


College: Accepts: Award:

U of M-Twin Cities: 3, 4, 5 3 credits

St Thomas 3, 4, 5 4 credits

Grinnell College 4, 5 4 credits

Columbia none none

Duke 4, 5 4 credits

U of M-Duluth 4, 5 3 credits

St. Scholastica 4, 5 4 credits

Hamline 3, 4, 5 4 credits

St. Cloud 3, 4, 5 4 credits






E. Lindblad-Andover High School-2015-16

Eric.linddblad@anoka.k12.mn.us Page





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